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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Houston, Texas, USA
    Posts
    460

    Default Re: For the beekeepers in the south east - What are you planting this summer and fall

    I run an automated drip irrigation system to a raised bed garden. I have 8 4'X12'X1' beds and 4 2'X10'X10" beds along the fence. Currently set up for 15 minutes in the morning and 15 minutes in the evening. I am going to dedicate one of my big beds to Borage for my girls, I want them happy! I will look into Niger but I have already bought 3 packs of Borage for my initial test.
    Mike
    N5RWH - 9a

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    320

    Default Re: For the beekeepers in the south east - What are you planting this summer and fall

    Just an update on the borage--my early summer crop reseeded itself and I planted some more in August. It began blooming in October and continued to bloom through mid December when we got temps down to about 15 degrees. A few of the plants are still alive even now and I suspect will come back when the weather warms a bit. Even for a "hardy annual" this stuff is amazing! I need to calendar planting some in early May to produce during our July/August dearth.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Laurens SC
    Posts
    74

    Default Re: For the beekeepers in the south east - What are you planting this summer and fall

    I know very little about borage. Really never hear of it. When can you plant it and how much area would you plant? It seems this stuff has to be stratified as well. Looks like that stuff goes for about 20$ a pound.
    Last edited by Michael1964; 02-04-2013 at 04:19 PM. Reason: misspelling.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    320

    Default Re: For the beekeepers in the south east - What are you planting this summer and fall

    Borage is an herb with beautiful light blue flowers. The stalks eventually get about 2 feet tall and generally fall over, then new blossoms appear all along the stem but it does get pretty messy looking. If you clip off the stem, it puts up multiple more. It is a hardy annual and prefers to be direct sown although I had no problem starting it in peat pots. My impression is that it is very easy and forgiving. Probably best to plant them in patches about 6 to 12 inches apart. Even a 4 x 4 ft. patch attracted bees like crazy. I didn't stratify mine and they all came up. I think you could plant them anytime the temps aren't likely to go below 25 anymore, although mine survived 20 degrees--the flower stalks died but the plants were fine. I even think you could plant them now and they would come up at the right time. They bloomed bigtime for a month or 6 weeks, eventually succumbing to mildew, but then babies popped up all over and were beginning to bloom by mid October. I'm thinking I want to be sure to plant some in early May to bloom through the July/August dearth and maybe more in June and July. They produced nectar through November here and sporadically after that. I read that the blossoms refill with nectar every 2 minutes, and the way my bees worked my dozen or so plants, I believe it--they were on them constantly! They need to be watered every few days in a drought in order to keep producing nectar. I just purchased a 4 oz. pkt (6,000 seeds) on ebay for $16 plus $2.25 shipping:

    Pkt. Size – 100+ Seeds for $1.00
    1oz – 1,500+ Seeds for $6.00
    4oz – 6,000+ Seeds for $16.00
    LB – 12,300+ Seeds for $26.00
    1 LB – 24,800+ Seeds for $42.00

    Definitely overkill, but I plan to share them with our beekeeping club members and sow them everywhere I can find a bit of dirt all summer--"little nancy borageseed".

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