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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Catlettsburg, KY, USA
    Posts
    104

    Default Deformed Wing Virus

    I have seen bees outside my hives that have DWV. It's raining today so I was able to get a close look at the front of the hive and saw probably 10 bees walking in front of it with obvious DWV. I have seen bees with it before and have treated about 3 times with powdered sugar. In all of my hive inspections I have not seen a bee on any of the frames inside the hive with deformed wings, but I have seen a few mites, which is why I did the powdered sugar dumps.

    My question is do I need to be worried about a few bees with DWV or is it normal?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    43

    Default Re: Deformed Wing Virus

    How do you tell the difference between old bees with frayed wings and DWV?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Posts
    1,643

    Default Re: Deformed Wing Virus

    DWV is different than frayed wings. With DWV the whole wing is shrivled looking instead of just being frayed on the ends.
    Yes, you should be worried. You need to do some kind of mite count to find out just how many mites are in the hive. Do a sticky board count, ether roll, or a sugar shake to get a mite count.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Chapel Hill, NC
    Posts
    707

    Default Re: Deformed Wing Virus

    DWV is not normal, so it's something you need to address. You do not mention any mite numbers, so I assume you do not monitor via counts for them. Do you have screen bottom boards? Start counting mites. 24 hour drop w/ no treatment, then a 24 and 48 hour drop w/ a powdered sugar treatment. Dusting 3 times w/ PS will not provide enough of a drop to get control. Dust a least once a week for 6 to 8 weeks, and keep count.
    If this were my hive, I'd pull the queen with a frame of bees in a nuc, and put in mite away quick strips.

    cpm, old bees look old, (no cute fuzzy hair on their thorax), often a bit darker in color, and may have frayed wings. DWV will cause the wings to spread away from the body or just the lack of wings that look like wings and more like crumpled paper.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Catlettsburg, KY, USA
    Posts
    104

    Default Re: Deformed Wing Virus

    I just took these photos so you can see what it looks like





    I only have 2 hives. One has a SBB and the other doesn't. What do I use for the sticky board? I have been considering MAQ's but I can't find a place that sells less than enough to treat 10 hives and I only have 2.

    Other than the bees with DWV the hive seems very healthy and is full of bees.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Catlettsburg, KY, USA
    Posts
    104

    Default Re: Deformed Wing Virus

    So I just inspected my hive without the SBB so I could pull some drone cells. I wasn't sure what you meant by "purple headed" but once I pulled them I figured it out. Unfortunately I pulled 7 and 6 had mites on them.



    As soon as I pulled one of the drones out a mite crawled out and hitched a ride on this workers back



    And I found a few bees on frames that had deformed wings. Here is a better shot..



    This hive was a split that I made from my only other hive on April 4th and let them raise their own queen.

    So from all I've read Mite Away Quick strips seem to be the treatment I am going to try. I went ahead and put a sticky board under my main hive which consists of 2 deeps and a short honey super on top. The super is almost full and capped so I guess I will be alright waiting until I extract before I treat that one?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Hampton CT
    Posts
    360

    Default Re: Deformed Wing Virus

    After treating this hive with MAQS, I would put on a pollen substitute and syrup to stimulate the queen to lay a lot of brood. They will need it to recover if indeed it is not too late allready. I would also reccomend that you treat your other hive. If one has that bad a varroa problem, you can bet the other is not far behind. The good news is that if you can burn the mites and then get the queen laying (hence the pollen sub) you may be able to save the hive. It is a long time till winter. Good luck

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Grosse Ile, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,834

    Default Re: Deformed Wing Virus

    Take this for what it is worth, in my experience the presence of DWV does not mean the hive is doomed. I have had bees crawling around in the grass with DWV every year for the last four years, but you would never know anything is wrong with any of my hives. They are all strong extremely productive hives and overwinter just fine. I don't treat with anything including powdered sugar and do no mite checks whatsoever. If you see evidence of DWV in otherwise perfectly normal hives I think that pouring the chemicals to them is simply ridiculous.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    96

    Default Re: Deformed Wing Virus

    I second checking your mite load. A quick way to tell is to pull a purple eyed drone larva from its capped cell, and count the number of mites that you find. Do this to 5 or 10 drones. If you average 2 or more mites per drone then you need to treat.

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