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Thread: survivor hive

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    vicksburg mi usa
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    Default survivor hive

    Hello all, I am a newbee and i just relocated a 15-20y.o. survivor colony to my house in southwest Mi zone 5. The question is...what is a good way to split them and switch to medium frames.
    I dont know exactly what i am looking for in regards to larva and brood. So I was considering taking a old hive body with bees and setting a new body and frame (med) on it. Also setting the two hives right next to each other. Thats my thoughts your input is appreciated.
    WILLIE

  2. #2
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    Apr 2011
    Location
    Weeki Wachee, Florida,USA
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    Default Re: survivor hive

    What is a 15-20 year old survivor colony?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Default Re: survivor hive

    Quote Originally Posted by captwillie View Post
    Hello all, I am a newbee and i just relocated a 15-20y.o. survivor colony
    Not to be rude, but, not probable.
    Mark Berninghausen #youmatter

  4. #4
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    Mar 2012
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    Calhoun Co, Texas, USA
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    Default Re: survivor hive

    Quote Originally Posted by captwillie View Post
    I dont know exactly what i am looking for in regards to larva and brood. So I was considering taking a old hive body with bees and setting a new body and frame (med) on it.
    1st, check out the Beekeeping Glossary that Barry and Rader Sidetrack are working on...it has some pics in it already, and more being added. One of the items with a really good pic already is "larvae". Also there's a good Wikipedia article on Brood (Honey Bee) with several pics of both larvae and eggs, just remember, those pics are magnified, the eggs in the comb are only maybe 1.5mm long and about 0.3-0.5mm wide!

    If you insert a new box full of empty/drawn frames on top of the BOTTOM box of the old colony, it should be filled with eggs & larvae VERY quickly, assuming the old hive's healthy & you have a flow on. That box can likely be removed to make a split in a week even. Once removed, set another box (pref. of drawn comb) on top of it, and leave it in the place of the old hive, move the old hive to a new spot (at least a few feet away), and many of the foragers will "move in" to your new hive, to keep it well stocked in bees/supplies while raising a new queen.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Default Re: survivor hive

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    Not to be rude, but, not probable.
    Hold on a minute! They may have found the holy grail of bee's. The hive might have the genetics that we build our super bee of the future from.

    captwillie,
    Most will find it very unlikely that a hive maintains a constant population without human intervention over a 15 year period. More likely that hives come and go from an abandoned box. Example : hive dies new swarm moves in the following year.
    There is lots of information here on how to make splits.
    There is less on switching to mediums, most feel that mediums are for old men and women!
    (that last sentence should get some comments)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Arlee MT USA
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    548

    Default Re: survivor hive

    I dunno if its that improbable. When I was a kid my dad had a hive for eight years with no treatments or feeding or manual requeening. Eventually it was a bear that got it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    vicksburg mi usa
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    35

    Default Re: survivor hive

    Quote Originally Posted by Mbeck View Post
    Hold on a minute! They may have found the holy grail of bee's. The hive might have the genetics that we build our super bee of the future from.

    captwillie,
    Most will find it very unlikely that a hive maintains a constant population without human intervention over a 15 year period. More likely that hives come and go from an abandoned box. Example : hive dies new swarm moves in the following year.
    There is lots of information here on how to make splits.
    There is less on switching to mediums, most feel that mediums are for old men and women!
    (that last sentence should get some comments)
    The man that tended the bees passed 15-20yr ago and the person that gave them to me hadnt touched them. There were probably ten hives at the location but only one with bees. The brush in front of the hives had grown out about twelve feet.
    yes it is possible that a swarm moved in.
    WILLIE

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    vicksburg mi usa
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    Default Re: survivor hive

    Thank you.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    St. Joseph County, Michigan, USA
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    Default Re: survivor hive

    captwillie -
    you aren't too far from me! there are 2 fairly large and active beekeeping clubs near you, both with meetings coming up. You may find some help there if you find in person communication easier. Michiana Beekeepers has a meeting this saturday in middlebury, IN-

    http://www.indianabeekeeper.com/loca...tions/michiana

    and kalamazoo bee club has one next thursday at the nature center-

    http://michiganbeekeepers.com/

    hope to see you there!

    Mbeck- I'm switching to all 8 frame mediums - which does that make me? an old man or a woman?! :P

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    vicksburg mi usa
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    35

    Default Re: survivor hive

    ARROWWOOD, thanks for the indiana link, i will be at the nature center. Say hi if you are there, my name tag will say "greg" .

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