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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Greenwich, New York, USA
    Posts
    10

    Default My newly captured Feral Bees are a mixed bag

    After a few years of buying Italian queens and a few pounds of stock Italian bees I was under the impression that queens just laid eggs for one subspecies i.e. Italtion, Russian, Carnolian and such. To my surprise, after capturing enough feral bees from a structural removal for two hives, these bees are quite different. There are small dark ones, medium size yellowish ones, and some bees that look greyish and a bit larger. The drones seem quite similar and greyish. Is this my imagination or do queens that mate freely produce a variety of female offspring from different drones?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Hartwell, GA
    Posts
    183

    Default Re: My newly captured Feral Bees are a mixed bag

    I bought queens from Russell, the Sunkist non cordovan, she is a beautiful light cordovan color, her offspring could be any color bees can be. From very light to almost solid black, some banded sonm lightly banded. I can't make those beautiful photos like you see on the internet, my bees all look like different breeds. Same way with Don the Fatbeeman''s, I have two of those as well. I don't claim to know anything about the breeding cept what I read. Look forward to hearing from some old timers on the forum.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Tulsa OK. USA
    Posts
    846

    Default Re: My newly captured Feral Bees are a mixed bag

    Free flight mated queens can mate with several drones and as I understand it the sperm from each mating is not mixed but somewhat seperate so the brood may/will vary as she works through her stores. Jim
    Stop and smell the flowers, 50,000 ladies can't be wrong
    Bsweetapiary@aol.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Little Rock, AR, USA
    Posts
    49

    Default Re: My newly captured Feral Bees are a mixed bag

    The queen accepts donations from several drones, so there can be quite a bit of genetic variance in her worker eggs. The feral queens were probably mutts that bred with the several drones available at the time. So your worker eggs can all have the same mother, not so much the father. The drone eggs are not fertilized, so only have her genes.
    Trying very hard not to kill the bees faster than they can reproduce.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Greenwich, New York, USA
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: My newly captured Feral Bees are a mixed bag

    Thanks everybody. That is what I thought. In the mix are some Zena the Barbarian warriors. I am not too unhappy about that because I would prefer if they did have some defenses. I like to sit and watch them without one or two coming over and trying to chase me away. I am much more attached to these feral bees than the ones I bought by the pound. I'll be interested to see how they make out with pests and the north winter.

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