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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Falls Church, VA
    Posts
    224

    Default Making my own queen

    Our club members are recommending that toward the end of summer, I exchange the queen I received with my GA package with a queen of known characteristics including the ability to weather the DC winter. They provided a guide (Mating Nucs, geared to a Lang). It is detailed, but it would help me to understand what Im doing if I could get a broader view of what has to be in place for the queen cell to take.
    Could I get your take on what has to be in place prior to introducing the queen cell and particularly why? Mike

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    2,288

    Default Re: Making my own queen

    If the only reason to replace your queen is because of the weather, I would go with the queen you have. She should easily adapt.
    President, San Francisco Beekeepers Association
    www.habitatforhoneybees.org

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Weweantic, Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Making my own queen

    Having lived for many years in Northern Virginia myself, I would tend to be of the opinion that you don't have anything to fear from the winters there. I think that your bees should be just fine in the mild winter weather around DC.

    Cheers

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    5,424

    Default Re: Making my own queen

    Can't comment on climate but I do know people often change queens when it's not nessecary.

    However, to answer your questions, I'm assuming you are talking about introducing an about to hatch queen cell? Personally I would recommend a mated caged queen, because virgins from introduced bought queen cells normally have around a 75% mating success rate, the other 25% dissappear for one reason or another leaving your hive queenless.

    But if you do introduce a queen cell, the instructions are the same as for a langstroth. Just press it gently into a comb in the middle of a brood area, the reason being so it will be kept at the right temperature until it hatches. It should be in the natural position, ie, pointing downwards. Some people use cell protectors, me, I never bother. If you leave your hive queenless 24 hours before introducing the cell there should be no problems with the bees tearing the cell down.
    44 years, been commercial, outfits up to 4000 hives, now 120 hives and 200 nucs as a hobby, selling bees. T (mostly).

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Falls Church, VA
    Posts
    224

    Default Re: Making my own queen

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldtimer View Post
    Can't comment on climate but I do know people often change queens when it's not nessecary.

    However, to answer your questions, I'm assuming you are talking about introducing an about to hatch queen cell? Personally I would recommend a mated caged queen, because virgins from introduced bought queen cells normally have around a 75% mating success rate, the other 25% dissappear for one reason or another leaving your hive queenless.

    But if you do introduce a queen cell, the instructions are the same as for a langstroth. Just press it gently into a comb in the middle of a brood area, the reason being so it will be kept at the right temperature until it hatches. It should be in the natural position, ie, pointing downwards. Some people use cell protectors, me, I never bother. If you leave your hive queenless 24 hours before introducing the cell there should be no problems with the bees tearing the cell down.
    Can you talk to what has to be in place and why?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    5,424

    Default Re: Making my own queen

    Well first, where is your hive up too, how much brood, stores, etc? Also, what are you wanting to use. A point of hatching queen cell, a caged mated queen, or what?
    44 years, been commercial, outfits up to 4000 hives, now 120 hives and 200 nucs as a hobby, selling bees. T (mostly).

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Falls Church, VA
    Posts
    224

    Default Re: Making my own queen

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldtimer View Post
    Well first, where is your hive up too, how much brood, stores, etc? Also, what are you wanting to use. A point of hatching queen cell, a caged mated queen, or what?
    I ment what has to be in place in the receiving nuc and why - Mike

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    5,424

    Default Re: Making my own queen

    What do you mean "what has to be in place?" The composition of the nuc? Are you introducing to a nuc or a TBH?

    What are you wanting to use. A point of hatching queen cell, a caged mated queen, or what?
    44 years, been commercial, outfits up to 4000 hives, now 120 hives and 200 nucs as a hobby, selling bees. T (mostly).

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Brainerd, MN
    Posts
    533

    Default Re: Making my own queen

    Mike,

    I think everybody is a bit confused here. Firstly I wouldn't worry about requeening. Secondly what exactly are you trying to do? Are you trying to rear queens? What is your current situation? How many hives do you have? What type of hives do you have? How many queens do you want to make? How do you plan on making them (there are many methods)?

    It seems to me that you maybe aren't even sure what you are trying to ask as I have no idea what you want to know. I would suggest reading Michael bush's section on queen rearing and get back to us.

    http://www.bushfarms.com/beesqueenrearing.htm

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Phoenixville, PA
    Posts
    581

    Default Re: Making my own queen

    Unless you see obvious problems, my vote is keep the queen and stay the course. IMHO the girls will replace her highness better than you can. If she does well through the winter, you will gave good stock to split at no cost.

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