Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Hillsdale, MI USA
    Posts
    110

    Default even split questions

    I split a 3 deep hive. The bottom 2 deeps had open and capped brood in each. The top deep had honey and pollen, no brood. I could not find the queen and could not see any eggs, it was cloudy and didn't have magnifying glass. So I took each deep with brood and faced them towards each other and added a deep of drawn comb and foundation on top of each. I then took the honey and pollen and put 5 frames of that in a deep and set on top of each of the deeps with comb and foundation thinking they will move it down. So now I have 2 hives with 3 deeps. I'm trying to split according to Michael Bush's instructions. Question 1. What are the chances that each brood box had a young enough egg to raise a queen? 2. The bee activity seems really alot stronger with one than the other after 24 hrs should I assume that the queen is in that hive? 3. When should I turn the hives so they are facing the direction I want them? It seems I should do it fairly soon as to not let them get used to that position and then just mess them up again later? I understand I have to watch for drift. 4. How long before queenless hive should have queen cells if they had an egg to raise?
    "The true meaning of life is to plant tree's, which under whose shade you do not expect to sit" Nelson Henderson

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Default Re: even split questions

    >I split a 3 deep hive. The bottom 2 deeps had open and capped brood in each. The top deep had honey and pollen, no brood. I could not find the queen and could not see any eggs, it was cloudy and didn't have magnifying glass. So I took each deep with brood and faced them towards each other and added a deep of drawn comb and foundation on top of each. I then took the honey and pollen and put 5 frames of that in a deep and set on top of each of the deeps with comb and foundation thinking they will move it down. So now I have 2 hives with 3 deeps. I'm trying to split according to Michael Bush's instructions.

    I have a lot of variations of splits, but this one sounds fine.

    > Question 1. What are the chances that each brood box had a young enough egg to raise a queen?

    Very good.

    >2. The bee activity seems really alot stronger with one than the other after 24 hrs should I assume that the queen is in that hive?

    Probably.

    > 3. When should I turn the hives so they are facing the direction I want them?

    Go about 45 degrees at a time, whenever you like.

    > It seems I should do it fairly soon as to not let them get used to that position and then just mess them up again later?

    If you do 45 degrees at a time they will adjust very quickly. If you do more they will be confused for longer.

    > I understand I have to watch for drift. 4. How long before queenless hive should have queen cells if they had an egg to raise?

    In 48 hours you should see distinct queen cells. In 12 days you'll have a virgin queen. In 26 days you'll likely have a laying queen.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Hillsdale, MI USA
    Posts
    110

    Default Re: even split questions

    Thank you very much Michael, I appreciate the help and thanks for your website.
    "The true meaning of life is to plant tree's, which under whose shade you do not expect to sit" Nelson Henderson

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    KC, MO, USA
    Posts
    1,238

    Default Re: even split questions

    What percent are walk away splits successful?

    A month later if you add a frame of brood will they have time to try again?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Default Re: even split questions

    >A month later if you add a frame of brood will they have time to try again?

    If that's the plan, I'd do it in three weeks. In three weeks the new virgin should have emerged and is probably doing mating flights and if the one you give them has eggs on it they have four days to start another queen if she doesn't make it back.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Hillsdale, MI USA
    Posts
    110

    Default Re: even split questions

    Flowerplanter, Mr. Bush would know better than I but I would think if after a week if you don't see queen cells being built you should give them a frame with eggs at that point and not wait a whole month. I would have no idea on how many walk away splits are successful, but if done this time of year and with attention I would assume most would do well.
    "The true meaning of life is to plant tree's, which under whose shade you do not expect to sit" Nelson Henderson

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Default Re: even split questions

    The percent success rate is very dependent on the flow. They almost always succeed on a flow. They often fail in a dearth. There is, of course, a continuum of conditions in between.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    KC, MO, USA
    Posts
    1,238

    Default Re: even split questions

    I have done 4 walk away splits this year first (8 month beek) was a little early but they had lots of capped queen cells so I took advantage, figured I could get a week+ jump start with cells before they swarmed. The first one was a success with lots of new capped brood a month after split, some bees drifted to the queen right hive and this hive grew a bit. The queenless was a bit grouchy for a few days/week. The queen right hive did not appear to swarm, but did seam like they had too many unemployed bees, 2 week inspection found allot of bees and queen cells so I split them again.

    About that time I split two more hives all with queen cells (open and closed), the grouchy hive indicated which was the queenless side, but all have become gentile after a week (hoping this means they are good to go with a new virgin) its been 3 weeks on the last two splits an inspection will hopefully find brood in all.

    We have had a flow for a month or more.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads