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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Calvert, Md,USA
    Posts
    1,701

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    Put one on when I put the second deep on

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,896

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    odfrank...You have been my hero, and now you are advocating inner covers????? WHY???

    cchoganjr

  3. #43
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,936

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    Quote Originally Posted by Cleo C. Hogan Jr View Post
    odfrank...You have been my hero, and now you are advocating inner covers????? WHY???cchoganjr
    I noticed he had to pry pretty hard to get the TC open. In my local we have a year round flow and hundreds of different types of trees to produce propolis. Covers are combed down, braced down, burred down and propolized down. Even migratory covers require some firm prying to get them open. A telescoping cover with no inner cover in my neck of the woods would be a fool's game. This is a typical brood chamber at my main site, and notice those frames are not old:

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Calvert, Md,USA
    Posts
    1,701

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    If you look at the video again, you can see the beginnings of exactly what OF is talking about. Bees are going to "seal" things up. I have some hives that glue the inner cover down pretty good. I know some beeks don't use them. I may not for a time, but once the population grows, I normally get one on there.

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,896

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    odfrank...Rick 1456.....PLEASE don't take this as a criticism, but if you are getting frames glued to the inner cover or migratory cover, (other than the seal around the box edge), then there is improper bee space. (Maybe old or ill fitting equipment??? I never use an inner cover, and rarely have glueing except at the edge. I often use a telescoping cover, (perhaps 75 -100 right now) but no inner cover, and by starting at the side, and proper angle on the hive tool, the top comes right off.

    Perhaps locale accounts for this, and the amount of propolis available in this area is not as intense as in yours.

    I was just asking. odfrank, you are still my hero. Anyone who catches that many swarms each year is doing something right. You catch more swarms each year than there are colonies of bees, (with the exception of mine) in this entire area. I have out about 35 swarm traps, caught 7 so far. Our feral bees were just about wiped out back in the late 1990's, they are making a come back now.

    cchoganjr

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Calvert, Md,USA
    Posts
    1,701

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    No problem,,,,,I make my own stuff so your observations are most likely correct. My thoughts are the dimensions given to build your own stuff incorporates an inner cover in the mix. Leave that off and the glueing begins. An inner cover creates additional bee space so the edges are what are sealed making entry less of a hassle. Just my thoughts.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,896

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    Rick 1456. You are correct. Unfortunately all companies do not use the same bee space procedure. Some make top, some make bottom. If beekeepers interchange these boxes, covers, and inner covers, they can get a lot of glue, burr comb, etc.

    I make all my equipment, plus what I sell, and mine are made for a flat top, migratory top, or inner cover that is all flat bottom. If the underside of the inner cover is indented, ( as most used to be years ago) they tend to glue it together, because of the additional space between the top bars and the recessed bottom of the inner cover..

    My biggest complaint with inner covers is small hive bettles.

    cchoganjr
    Last edited by Cleo C. Hogan Jr; 05-28-2012 at 05:50 PM.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,936

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    Quote Originally Posted by Cleo C. Hogan Jr View Post
    if you are getting frames glued to the inner cover or migratory cover, (other than the seal around the box edge), then there is improper bee space.
    My bees don't care about bee space. 1/8", 1/4", 5/32", 3/8'...fill that gap with some wax and quit hiding and goofing off on top of the inner cover. Put some comb up there also.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,936

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    And pray tell what size bee space from topbar to lid will not get combed down???

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,508

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    Whatever space mine have. I've never had one combed down. 5/16"? Must be a western bee thing.
    Regards, Barry

  11. #51
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,896

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    Maybe it is a Kentucky thing, mine don't get glued down. Tops come off clean.

    I really do believe bees care about bee space, if not, boxes / frames, would be made any size, any length, any height, just add bees.

    But, I don't use inner cover.

    cchoganjr

  12. #52
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Calhoun Co, Texas, USA
    Posts
    1,310

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    I use modified TBH with Lang. compatible bars (i.e. bee space between and above the bars)...bee space of 3/8" until the ply warps...have had 0 comb built above the bars, but PLENTY of propolis sealing the lids down

  13. #53
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Calvert, Md,USA
    Posts
    1,701

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    Bee race seems to have a role in propoplis amounts. Mine are pretty much Mutts at this point but I see big differences propolis amounts between the ones I have. The swarm in the video was responding, to a certain extent, to some ants that were taking up residence on the top of the frames. Put a circle of cinnamon around the hive. Repels the ants for a while at least.

  14. #54
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Calvert, Md,USA
    Posts
    1,701

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    For those of you that are following the saga of, "Gertrude and the Girls" here is week seven. Thanks for looking
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xmzo9j0oOlA&feature=plcp

  15. #55
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Clackamas Oregon
    Posts
    755

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    Well you did better than me! I have 6 traps out this year and when I did my weekly check I seen bees coming and going (like in your first video) and ran it home and had nothing. Same as last year, patience is not my tool kit. I put the trap back up the next Monday and have not gone back for fear of “setting the hook” premature. It all sounds so easy on the forum but it does not seem to work as I want it to. Just like watching the fishing video and then going out and expecting to get so many I can do the “upgrade” for the larger limit.
    “Why do we fall, sir? So that we might learn to pick ourselves up” Alfred Pennyworth Batman Begins (2005)

  16. #56
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Calvert, Md,USA
    Posts
    1,701

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    It is the difference between being in a "target rich" environment and not It makes the "one" you get all the more special That's why it is called "fishing" instead of "catching", and "trapping" instead of "getting". LOL Hang in there.

  17. #57
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Clackamas Oregon
    Posts
    755

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    Just went and checked the one that I put back up. I am seeing about 1 bee per second (BPS) going in and only 1 per minute leaving. No orientation flights, they are in a straight line down through the pine boughs. It is too brush heavy to see if their baskets are loaded. Figure I will leave them bee and pull it on this upcoming weekend. I don’t think I have enough deep frames made for them anyway. Besides the blackberries are in full bloom down here and just starting at home. Funny how 500’ elevation difference can set the bloom back by a week or two.
    “Why do we fall, sir? So that we might learn to pick ourselves up” Alfred Pennyworth Batman Begins (2005)

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