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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Brookville, PA
    Posts
    206

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    I just noticed yesterday bees checking out my swarm trap. There were about 10 bees flying in and out, flying around the sides and checking out the gaps.

    I decided to put up another trap just in case my one hive is planning on swarming - that way there will be two choices for them - and hopefully one of my traps is better suited than anywhere else! Currently, the only thing in them is frames with undrawn foundation and some lemon grass oil.

    Congratulations on your trap working. (And yeah, as others said, put in frames so they can make their comb on the frames.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Calvert, Md,USA
    Posts
    1,701

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    I understand and appreciate the suggestions.
    Just MHO, but this is a lure, not a guarantee. I'm not putting these things anywhere near known hives. I'm not intersted in some body elses bees. Looking for feral stock. No guarantee there either but primitive areas, more or less, are the locations. Having said that, it would take a lot of resources to fully equip a lot of traps fully with frames of any sort. I'm thinking too, what about theft? If I have to cut and mount some comb, I'm good with that.
    Pa beek,,,,,just my experince has been traps close to my hives do not capture swarms from my hives. You need to put them on someone elses property several hundred yards (at least) away. Good luck

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,842

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    Rick 1456 In my experience, you don't have to fully equip your bait hives with frames. I use two drawn brood combs, and two starter foundation. Start by putting the two brood combs against one wall, then the two foundation. Leave the center open. Rarely have they gone beyond the two foundation frames to drop comb of their own, because this would split the colony.

    Why not put your hives where they may be productive, feral or someone else's bees. When you catch a swarm you don't know for sure if it is a feral hive or came from another's hives. Either way, you have a new colony. And the bees can be moved and the bait hive set up again very quickly.

    I feel it is a good idea to have swarm boxes near your own hives, and quite often bees will go into them. From 3 feet to 100 yards will get you swarms. What we may not know for sure is, where they came from. It is known that swarming bees are attracted to areas where there are other bees. So, that swarm might not be yours, but came to your bees and settled into a box very near your bee yard. Might be feral, might not.

    At least in my area, swarm box theft has never been a problem. I did have one episode of 3 hives being stolen from a bee yard in 1998. But never one of my swarm boxes. Of course, I only use old 10 frame deeps, ready to be thrown away, for swarm boxes, and perhaps no one would want them. But, they work.

    cchoganjr

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Calvert, Md,USA
    Posts
    1,701

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    I think the putting of the comb to the sides with starter in between is the way to go from now on. Makes sense. Wish it had come to me in one of my bee dreams doh
    I had five boxes set up at my hive yard last year. Two swarms. One I actually was able to follow and watched it go into hollow branch of a very large oak about 500 yards down the road. The cluster was too high for me to retrieve. So, it didn't work for me. But your advise having them around is well taken and I do have an old box set up hoping to catch a swarm from that swarm Most of the few boxes I have set up are old 10 framers but they are the best for luring them in and don't want to loose them. I have a couple that I put together from wooden wine boxes. Certain ones will hold frames if you scab a ledge for them to rest on. Haven't caught any in one of those yet. Still early though. Someone will probably steal those thinking there is wine in them. Hummm, may have paint them camouflage
    Anyway, it is all good. Thanks and happy hunting!

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Calvert, Md,USA
    Posts
    1,701

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    My camera man re did the you tube video and here is the new link for those intersted.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fd8WOhMwqy4
    There is an advertisement there that I know nothing about. My camera man does not put ads on his site so I don't know where it came from. We are not "luring " you in.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Winhall, VT
    Posts
    1,066

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    Nice video! Fun to watch!

    After you had the queen I personally would have just shaken the rest of the bees into the hive so I could work the comb easier. And rubber bands are so much easier!!

    Congrats on the swarm!
    Raising Vermont Bees one mistake at a time.
    USDA Zone 5A

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Calvert, Md,USA
    Posts
    1,701

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    I thought of doing it that way. My reasoning for not, was they were calm. I figured the air would bee full of angry bees had I shaken them . Obviously, 20/20 it would have worked either way. I had the cotton string, not rubber bands. I think the RBs would be easier.
    Thanks for watching

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Calhoun Co, Texas, USA
    Posts
    1,310

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    I hate rubber bands for splicing comb...if the string works, stick with it...I ended up having to throw out a good bit of comb because the bees chewed off too many of the rubber bands before they got the comb glued into the frame. ...just my experience, but it was quite a mess!
    On a similar note, I just picked up some hardware cloth yesterday...think I'll be making a few frames with the hardware cloth attached permanently on one side, then just tacked on at the bottom of the other side. Then when I want to splice in some comb, I can just open, insert comb, then tie the open side shut, or put a couple staples into the top corners...only drawback is it'll be impossible to remove the HW cloth without destroying the comb later, so those combs won't be able to be transferred into my sloped-side TBH hives (unless I spend about 5x as much time building the "keystone" frames, instead of the quicker, square ones)...if you're using all Lang. equipt, I don't see that as really being much of an issue though.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Calvert, Md,USA
    Posts
    1,701

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    Robherc,
    Apprceiate the comment on the string. I hadn't thought the RBs would be an issue but I can see why the bees might want that "rubber stuff" out quick. The string I used is a heavy cotton. I'll stick with the string, and the heavier stuff instead of kite string just for the reason you gave, it will last a little longer. I use 20lb test fishing line through the frames. I want to be able to cut Q cells or egg strips for queen rearing down the road.
    Thanks

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,842

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    I use Parcel Post wrapping twine. After they attach the comb, they will chew and remove the string. When they are finished, most of the comb is nice looking. If it winds up bad, I rotate it out later.

    cchoganjr

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Calvert, Md,USA
    Posts
    1,701

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    The parcel post twine, is that a synthetic ? Nylon strands? Just curious.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,842

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    No, it is a cotton string. Very strong, very small. I used it in manufacturing rigged fishing worms for years, then started using it for wrapping brood comb. I start one nail on the inside of the top bar, wrap the brood about every four inches across to the other side, go around the top bar and end bar, then come back, splitting the middle, across to the nail and tie off. This string is available at WalMart, is not expensive.

    cchoganjr

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Calvert, Md,USA
    Posts
    1,701

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    I'll check it out,,,,thanks

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,842

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    Rick 1456... I found a spool of the twine that still had the data on it. It says:

    BEACON EXTRA STRENGTH PARCEL POST TWINE 8 ply 300ft. (100) yards, and the price......Are you ready for this???.. A whopping 69 cents plus tax is printed on the data wrapper, but the sales sticker says, 43 cents. It also says, Distributed by. Schermerhorn Brothers Company, Los Angeles Calif 90023 ART 41849

    I sold the lure company in 1985, so the twine is at least 27 years old. I googled Schermerhorn Brothers Company and they are still in business. I did not search to see if they still distribute the parcel post twine.

    cchoganjr

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Calvert, Md,USA
    Posts
    1,701

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    Checked them and added brood frame.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IeE5P...ature=youtu.be

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Winhall, VT
    Posts
    1,066

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    Great video. Well on your way to having a real strong hive there. And safe from bears on top of that container!
    Raising Vermont Bees one mistake at a time.
    USDA Zone 5A

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Calvert, Md,USA
    Posts
    1,701

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    You now what,,,,,,those containers may just be the cats meow They are huge. Bee hives on top, create access from below, storage inside, no mowing issues, man cave, and I don't think they are that expensive.
    A small apartment for times when home life is,,,,,,,,,,,,,troubled
    Thanks

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Calvert, Md,USA
    Posts
    1,701

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Calhoun Co, Texas, USA
    Posts
    1,310

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    Wow, really highlights the differences between my AHB swarms and "normal" feral bees. First, I was shocked when your lifting the cover wasn't greeted by a loud hiss from the exasperated bees, then by the near total lack of bees on the top bars/lid (mine are almost always packed in there SOLID...not sure why). With my hives, by time you started smoking those bars, you likely would've had nearly 100 stingers already lodged in your gloves, and every time I move a bar/frame my gloves get COVERED in stinging bees, lol (makes me glad I have new, NON-AHB queens ordered lol....). Also, my AHB swarms each filled 16-17 bars (equivalent to 21-24 deep Lang. frames) in their first 5 weeks, fairly regardless of swarm size.

    I'm quite jealous of your ability to work your hive so easily, but at the same time, like having the faster build-up...interesting differences. Overall, your inspection looked like it went quite well to me, now let's see how quickly they fill that second box

  20. #40
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,898

    Default Re: Behavior around swarm traps

    At some point you will regret not having an inner cover.

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