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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    fountain city, wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    35

    Default Hive move gone bad, need advice

    this is my first experience with beekeeping, i moved two warre hives I had purchased about 130 miles to home, had hive blocked, ratchet strap circumventing and plastic pallet wrap around them.Of course some bees escaped but stayed in the truck topper but on one hive many were between the hive and plastic wrap. The move was three boxes high because they were making comb that low. When I separated the bottom to add the fourth box I found that the comb had let loose and was on the screened bottom. Well of course this is a bit of a dilemma for an amateur. So I removed the comb, set the hive, shook the comb into a box for fear of loosing the queen, set the box up on ramp, most went inside, still had thousands of bees on outside of hive in a large cluster. I observed for a long time and noticed some were crawling down and back inside. Left them for an hour, most went in but several large groups remained. I felt these bees maybe had never been out of hive before and the cooler weather in the 50's they seemed stuck, brushed them onto cardboard, dumped them on landing board and they scrambled in. Things settled down after that.

    questions,
    1 Is there such thing as the wrong time to move a hive? the folks i got the hives from needed to sell due to city ordinance
    2. what could I have done different ? because i know other can learn from this
    3. what should I do with the comb that fell, it look as if they were putting stuff in it? do i put it out for the bees or discard?

    I am new to this and maybe what I did may seem foolish, but I have learned a lot from this site, and know i have a lot more to learn. Thank you for the help. Sorry this got long.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,990

    Default Re: Hive move gone bad, need advice

    [QUOTE=pelz;785513]

    >1 Is there such thing as the wrong time to move a hive? the folks i got the hives from needed to sell due to city ordinance
    You had little choice on that matter.

    >2. what could I have done different ? because i know other can learn from this
    You have already learned why frame hives were invented.

    >3. what should I do with the comb that fell, it look as if they were putting stuff in it? do i put it out for the bees or discard?
    Never discard wax, that is one of your valuable bi-products. Let them rob it and add to your wax collection.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    372

    Default Re: Hive move gone bad, need advice

    Yeah, I think you did everything you could have. Wax is fragile and it falls sometimes when transported, especially in large sections, but you didn't have much of a choice. It seems like you did it when it was cold, so that made it as hard as possible. It's just like with a TBH, the wax will come off sometimes. You saved the hive, and they will rebuild.

    I've been told by tons of people to make sure the wax is away from the hive for them to strip it. If it's in front of the hive then others will find it and the hive will fight. I have my bees in the back yard so the wax goes in the front under a cover.

    You did what you could. There are always bumps along the road, some set us back farther than others.
    Disclaimer: I know enough to know I don't know anything yet.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    227

    Default Re: Hive move gone bad, need advice

    The scary thing is the city ordinance.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    fountain city, wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: Hive move gone bad, need advice

    Thanks for the advice, things have calmed down as have I.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    227

    Default Re: Hive move gone bad, need advice

    At my age very few things make my heart pound with excitement, which is one of the reasons I love bee keeping. Capturing a swarm, stopping a fight between hives, that first flow of honey after the harvest, its all just so much fun.

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