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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
    Posts
    140

    Default Direct release, or bee release...And feeder?

    Thoughts on spraying bees and queen or not. I have two top bars completed. Bees will be here and ready to install the 6th of may. Nights right now are still fairly chill at or slightly below freezing.

    I also thought about a marshmallow for a fairly quick bee release either suspended or laid on the bottom of my tbh.

    I am brand new to keeping bees. I built two golden mean hives. Still need to finish the window covers up tonight. I have their video and keeping bees in western Canada book.

    Also wanted to ask about size. The gmtbh seems small. Has anyone tried a super? If so will I need the spaces between the bars like in langstroths in the golden mean complete with queen excluder?

    Lastly. I built the feeder shown on the "honey beats" website. I'd post a link if I knew how, using my cell right now. Anyways. Instead of screen around the jar I used some thin plywood. Drilled a hole with appropriate Forstner bit. Question is will this be ok? And about how big of holes do I need and how many in the mason jar lid?

    Thanks!
    Dan
    Alaska

    Ps great site been reading the last week or so now.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
    Posts
    140

    Default Re: Direct release, or bee release...And feeder?

    Heres my hive and my feeder.

    Any help is greatly appreciated!

    not sure how, but i managed to crack one of my windows putting the finishing touches. its the one with the door over it right now. So far its not loose but it did crack from the end down to the bottom edge. They are glued in with plumbers goop. I might try and chip it out and just clip it in, not sure how to really say that.

    I do have the backer board for my feeders. Wanted to be certain the feeders are ok? is the entrance big enough? how big of holes and how many in the lid?

    beehive2.jpg
    beehive1.jpg

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Weweantic, Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Direct release, or bee release...And feeder?

    The entrance to the feeders looks big enough, I think that you might want to try to make a different design more like a Boardman feeder so that you can just notch out your follower board and then you can refill the feeder inside the segregated portion of the hive and not disturb the bees.

    As far as releasing the queen........just do a direct release. You will be better off for not having hung the queen cage and then having to contend with messed up crooked comb that the will build around the cage.

    Cheers

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Cloverdale, B.C., Canada
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: Direct release, or bee release...And feeder?

    The feeder looks good to me. Sometimes it helps to drizzle a trail of syrup leading to and on the entrance holes on the feeder follower board to help lead the bees to the feeder.

    Here is the link you mentioned: http://thehoneybeat.com/2011/07/our-...syrup-feeders/

    As for the holes in the jar of the lid - I use a push-pin for posters to poke holes in it, but a small nail or something similar work too. I usually do at least a dozen or more, or until my fingers get too sore to make more. People usually recommend doing something to dull the sharp edges of the metal on the inside of the holes to minimize the chance of the bees cutting their proboscis.

    Based on the weather you are having my opinion on spraying the bees when installing them is DO NOT do it. I normally don't do it because we install our packages at night, so flying bees are not an issue. And, more importantly because it is usually cold (and often raining) during late Feb or early March when the packages arrive. Wet bees and cold weather are not an ideal combination.

    Good luck with the install, I hope it goes well.

    6470zzy - the feeder AkDan built is similar to a boardman, and can be filled as you mentioned. Instead of going under the follower board, the feeder entrance is accessed by the bees through holes in the follower board. I also second your advice to do a direct release if the OP is comfortable doing so.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Dunlap, TN, USA
    Posts
    146

    Default Re: Direct release, or bee release...And feeder?

    You know, this is such a simple design on your feeder.... yet I've been trying to think of something to use on my TBH for weeks now. I saw this and I was like "Yes! That's what I'll do."

    Nice little design there. Good luck with your install. I'll be getting my bees the week after yours.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    San Francisco, California
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: Direct release, or bee release...And feeder?

    I installed a package into a Top Bar at the end of last month. Hanged the queen cage on the second bar. Lifted the cage and released the queen on the 3rd day. About two weeks after releasing the queen, I opened up the hive and looked at each bar; got 7 straight bars of combs with broods at different stages, along with honey and pollen.

    For feeding I used a small bowl in the middle of the hive with small pieces of wood floating on the squar water. When I needed to refill, I opened one or two bars and poured from the top.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Baker Oregon
    Posts
    2,291

    Default Re: Direct release, or bee release...And feeder?

    In directly releasing the queen I would suggest opening the queen cage and than placing it in the TBH and quickly closing the hive. Last week I got to watch one of my queens fly around for a long 20 seconds (I think she landed back in the hive but am not sure). If I do a direct release in the future the whole cage is going to be left in the hive for a while.

    PS How big are the hives? They seem a bit small, but that may be just the photo.
    Dan Hayden 4 Years. 9 hives. Tx Free. USDA Zone 5b.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
    Posts
    140

    Default Re: Direct release, or bee release...And feeder?

    Thanks for the info! Lots to think about on the release, I suppose weather is going be a big determining factor.

    Does any one use marshmellows for a quick release candy? (saw it on youtube lol).

    I do like the feeders....I obviously didnt think of it, just saw it and made it. I do have a concern about feeding come fall. There's going to be hive (hopefully) in the way, I do think this method is pretty slick for a beginner starting out on a tbh, time will tell once I have bees!

    its the golden mean plans. The sides are 10"es high 28.5" L x 18"es w. I didnt know anything when I saw them other than they sold plans. Now that I've been reading for awhile, have built them, I'm wondering the same thing. I reckon once I get honey I'll likely have to take a bar out every now and then dependant on how they do to keep them from absconding? The local tbh keeper likes putting supers on his. He's using 1" top bars with a screw to give him the 1 3/8 width. Pretty slick idea, though I dont know how much to even expect really. honestly I'll be tickled if they dont fly off or die before winter hits. WIntering is a hole different topic. I dont know if its possible to over winter in a TBH outdoors. My garage isnt heated but it does get some radiant heat from the house so its not freezing either. My biggest concern here is the truck going in and out, snowmachine, and what wood working I do. So flucuations in temp some (not much) exhaust, and wooddust. Questions for another thread lol.

    I'm thinking I can save the cracked window by using the clear packing tape on the outside. I'm thinking I'm going to add it to both just in case hive 2 cracks also. If I do not over winter this winter, I can fix the glass or resort to the third backup hive. I put 3/32 glass in, reckon I should have gone with something thicker or better quality. Hopefully the clear packing tape will keep things from falling apart here.

    I did use some insulation board on 3 sides....Its held on friction fit on the ends and taped to hold the back side on with the waterproof silver tape. I figured when we finally hit the hot weather (yes it gets hot in the north pole LOL), I can pull the insulation off. It basically just slips off.

    Only other question is ratio of feed....1:1 or 2:1 sugar to water? What dictates what to use? forgot one other one, the pollen paddies. He has a couple for me, not sure how to secure them to the hive. Maybe on the floor? or sandwiched between two bars hanging? How fast do they eat these things? I dont have gaps in my bars though I may on my next set of bars.

    Thanks again!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Baker Oregon
    Posts
    2,291

    Default Re: Direct release, or bee release...And feeder?

    Quote Originally Posted by AkDan View Post
    The sides are 10"es high 28.5" L x 18"es w.
    So if I calculated that right the volume would be about 82 liters, or less if the measurements were a the widest points. That would be about two deeps in volume. That may not be enough.
    Quote Originally Posted by AkDan View Post
    I did use some insulation board on 3 sides....Its held on friction fit on the ends and taped to hold the back side on with the waterproof silver tape. I figured when we finally hit the hot weather (yes it gets hot in the north pole LOL), I can pull the insulation off. It basically just slips off.
    I think being able to insulate the top is more important than any other side.

    Quote Originally Posted by AkDan View Post
    Only other question is ratio of feed....1:1 or 2:1 sugar to water? What dictates what to use?
    1:1 is usually a spring feed to stimulate wax production, 2:1 is used in the fall to help them get sufficient stores for the winter (if they lack them)
    Dan Hayden 4 Years. 9 hives. Tx Free. USDA Zone 5b.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
    Posts
    140

    Default Re: Direct release, or bee release...And feeder?

    Think I should lengthen my next one? If so rhoughts on how long?It's too late now on these. I fly south in a few hours. Install bees the evening I get home. This is where the idea of a super made sense. With my current bars that's out though I could make the gapped version Im sure before I need to move the follower board.

    I did fail to mention there's insulation in my lid. Still planning on a steeple roof when I get home. Something to shed the rain a little better. Figured I can add it after the bees are in I hope.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Chickamauga, Walker County, Georgia
    Posts
    285

    Default Re: Direct release, or bee release...And feeder?

    Did this... don't know if it's best...

    1. Remove the queen cage and set it inside the hive, still closed, with the hanging-strap extended for easy reach.
    2. Dump the bees. Repeat until you've gotten as many of them out as you can.
    3. Pick up the queen cage, shake the bees off (just like you shook 'em out of the can), gently brush off the rest with the bee-brush.
    4. Remove the non-candy cork (with a pin or the tip of a jackknife blade), and promptly place your finger over the opening, then set the cage screen-up on the bottom of the box (or on top of the bees) facing lengthwise so the hole is clear. Withdraw your hand and, as you are closing up (unhurriedly), observe that she's on her way out and is immediately surrounded by bees. If you're very worried about her flying, a very light mist of plain water to slightly dampen her wings.
    5. If you wanted to "do candy," I'd smear a bit of fresh marshmallow into that opening: you know about that marshmallow.

    I went in three days later to "check the cages" and that was a mistake: I knew the queen was on her way out when I closed up, and I inadvertantly damaged some brand-new comb. The cages were still there on the floor of the hives, empty and ignored. I didn't need to do it. But since I was there, I reached in just with my gloved hand and retrieved them.

    The only distraction I used is water with peppermint-oil. It seems to mask the alarm scent and it kills a sting fairly directly. I use the finest "mist" setting I can persuade the spray-bottle to deliver; I don't want to "hit them" with it. I don't put sugar into the spray because I don't want to coat the bees with wet sugar: I'm afraid it will "gum them up." A dusting of dry powdered sugar (be sure the mixture contains no cornstarch ... you can pulverize white sugar in your blender or with a coffee-mill) is also an effective distraction. I'd prefer not to make them think the woods are on fire.

    Disclaimer: new-bee.

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