Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 36
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Sheboygan, WI, USA
    Posts
    3

    Default First stings delayed reaction

    Hello all,

    Easter weekend my mom and I got our first packages and installed them. We didn't have much of a problem installing them besides the 3 (well deserved) stings I got. I didn't have much of a reaction to the stings at first. I was actually relieved at how little it actually hurt. Exactly a week later one of the spots I got stung swelled up, turned red, and itched extremely bad! At the time I figured I had a spider bite or something. The next day the 2 other spots did the same thing and that's when I realized it must have had something to do with the bee stings. My mom also got stung once that day but she didn't have any reaction at all.

    So, my questions is, has anyone else had this happen? Should I be concerned?

    Thanks all,

    Sheila

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    North East, OH
    Posts
    298

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    Bee venom reacts differently on different people. Generaly it's not a major issue - but you have to judge for yourself what to do and when to seek medical help.

    I've never had a delayed reaction, but it could have been some type of reaction you body had to healing - Itching is VERY normal in healing. - are you sure you got all the stinger out? Perhaps a a bit of it was stuck in there and as it dissolved caused the delay.

    I like Benadryl gel locally applied the best.
    Last edited by pokerman11; 04-17-2012 at 11:27 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Dunlap, TN, USA
    Posts
    146

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    Sheila, I'm no doctor (so take it as normal advice from a friend) but I wouldn't worry to much if this is the only reaction you had.

    If you had immediate swelling or other form of reaction I would worry, but a whole week later is probably just some skin irritation. I've had similar reactions myself before. Not honey bee stings but other insects. It wouldn't bother me until days later and then it was just very itchy.

    Immediate reactions are the things you want to be very cautious of. I think you'll be fine

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Calhoun Co, Texas, USA
    Posts
    1,310

    Exclamation Re: First stings delayed reaction

    Being someone who's allergic (to a degree) to bee stings, and a (former) medical professional, I can calm your worst fears by saying "that's not an allergic reaction." That said, if those were your first stings, it could be an indication that you're going to be allergic next time you get stung. When your body is exposed to a foreign substance (ex: honeybee venom) for the first time, it reacts very minimally, as you don't yet have any antigens towards this substance (i.e. same as with a vaccination, your body "learns" to respond by creating specific "trigger" molecules that'll target that substance next time, causing an immune response). The next time (and every time thereafter) your body is exposed to the same foreign substance, your immune system is "ready for it" and, if you were predisposed to develop an allergy to that substance, your immune system now goes into "fight mode" attacking the substance that it believes to be a threat to your health. This immune response, depending on the reaction time, is what is called an allergic response (immediate immunological overresponse to a non-pathogenic foreign body/substace) and, if systemic &/or strong enough, can be life threatening. I'll cut myself off here, rather than going into modification of immune responses, etc...

    With your reaction a week later to the 3 stings you received, I'd venture a guess that that may be from your body forming antibodies to the bee venom, and, as such, be a warning that your reaction to the next sting could be far worse (or, it could not...nothing's certain with such highly variable things as immunology). My recommendation: SEE YOUR DOCTOR, ask him/her if they think you should carry an EPI-PEN and a reaction kit (often includes special sting-remover tweezers, 1-2 epi-pens, and systemic antihistamine pills) with you in the future, in case your next sting elicits a severe response.

    Good luck, and happy (SAFE) beekeeping
    -Rob


    Medical Caveat: I am neither a doctor, nor a (currently) licensed medical professional. As such, the above information is presented as my personal opinion only, and under no circumstances should it be taken as medical advice or instruction. Anyone wanting medical advice, instruction, or direction, should consult with a medical professional who is licensed to practice in your area.
    A good "rule of thumb" to follow concerning any type of medical issue is: If you have doubts, or are concerned, CALL YOUR DOCTOR! That's your doctor's job, and only your doctor knows enough about your body to give you qualified advice.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Chicago,Ill.
    Posts
    61

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    You might want to go to , American Apitherapy Society. They have all you need to know about bee venom and the good things that come from it as well.You can also order an epic pen from them. I always keep one around just in case,for visitors.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Pine Mt. Georgia
    Posts
    65

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    I like to have Wounded Warrior Ointment on hand for bee stings.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Madison, WI, USA
    Posts
    175

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    For me, stings can be different depending on where I am stung. Stings to the hands and fingers usually just itch. "Up the sleeve" stings do swell up more, maybe because I don't feel them right away and I am getting more venom?

    I keep some benadryl cream in my tool kit. I am going to ask my Dr for an epi-pen this year, as I sometimes have other people along with me when I do hive inspections, and you never know who might be allergic (even though it is a small % of population overall).
    life is finite while knowledge is infinite. - Zhuang Zi

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Slippery Rock PA
    Posts
    40

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    Sometimes a sting site on my body will get really itchy around day 3. It doesn't happen all the time, usually on my inner upper arm or anywhere there is softer tissue. I don't have any immediate reactions, just the itching 2 to 3 days later and sometimes it really sucks. Make sure you get the stingers out and I would carry and epipen just in case. I always have one in my truck.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Sheboygan, WI, USA
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    Thanks everyone. I think I'm going to call my Doctor and get myself an epi-pen just in case. I also am not going to be alone with the bees any time soon. I am allergic to a few things that cause severe reaction such as hives so I suppose this could be cause for concern. I know for sure I got all the stingers out so that wasn't an issue for me. I guess it's better to be safe then sorry. Thanks again!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Arlee MT USA
    Posts
    548

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    I'm work for the ambulance and our protocol for allergic reactions is to only use epi if there are breathing difficulties or a severe drop in blood pressure. But thats just us, you should probably be more cautious. We do, however, get a lot of calls for people that have taken epi for a suspected allergy before they had any symptoms of any kind and earned themselves a thousand dollar ambulance bill for a problem that may not exist.

    For milder reactions we use oral Benadryl. Benadryl is very effective but slow to act, 30 min minium as opposed to epi which works in seconds. Benadryl is great to use for minor histamine reactions but will kick in far too late to save you for a true allergic reaction.

    Something to remember is that epi is only effective for about 15 to twenty minutes. If the ambulance is farther than that away you may need more than one pen and strongly consider taking a does of benadryl as soon as possible so it can have a chance to kick in around the same time the epi is wearing off.

    The thing to remember is not to panic if you get stung. Allergic reactions, even bad ones are almost never as dramatic as you see on TV.

    Even a sever reaction will take a few minutes to develop. Look for dizziness, nausea, pale clammy skin and the development of hives on your chest and neck and thighs. You may feel tightness in your chest that can lead to wheezing. Many people report tunnel vision, described as a darkness pressing in from the corners of their vision.

    Hives are the surest way to know if you are having an allergic reaction. All the other symptoms can be cause by a panic attack which is common among people who think they have an sting allergy. Remember hives are the most reliable indications that you are having a reaction.

    If you are by yourself and have epi you should probably use it as soon as you feel any symptoms since by the time they become sever enough to know for sure that you need epi your blood pressure may have dropped so far that your not thinking straight anymore.

    If you know for sure that you have an allergy to stings then you should obviously take your epi immediately and call 911. Epi is a pretty amazing drug and can completely reverse the symptoms in less than a minute. You can literally watch the hives fade before your eyes. I've had people who where almost unable to breath before the epi refusing to go on the ambulance five minutes later because they felt "fine".



    Personally when I get stung I always get an immediate welt that fades away in about half an hour and then usually about 24 hours later I get swelling and itching, kind of like a giant mosquito bite that fades over a few days.

    I don't know or not if the benadryl cream does anything for allergic reactions, true allergic reactions are a systemic (body wide) event, its hard to imagine that local cream will do anything other than stop itching, but I don't know for sure, I've never tried to use it that way.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Ankeny, Iowa, USA
    Posts
    591

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    I asked my Doctor about an Epi Pen when I had my physical a month ago. He said he couldnt write a prescription for me unless I was allergic to bee venom. How did you get your Doctors to go along with getting you an Epi Pen?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    OKC, OK USA
    Posts
    2,869

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    Humm, just told him I was getting back into beekeeping and needed one and he wrote the script.
    Mike Forbes
    Red Dirt Apiaries

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Bryan, TX
    Posts
    112

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    As one who has allergies (have for years) and in Moderately Allergic to bees, GET an Epi-Pen. One or two stings and I am fine. Next day, minor swelling at site of sting and itching. A couple of weeks ago, I was using a weed eater (gas) near a very calm hive. They went beserk! I got 12+ stings. Within 20 minutes, my wife had me at the ER (we live 3 minutes away if we catch the red light). Having serious trouble breathing. was thankful to have them very responsive to my condition. Now, Epi-Pen never leaves my pocket. Better safe than sorry!

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Calhoun Co, Texas, USA
    Posts
    1,310

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by LeonardS View Post
    How did you get your Doctors to go along with getting you an Epi Pen?
    I told my doctor I react badly to bee stings & asked for a pen...DR wrote script, I picked up pen. I've never heard of a Dr NOT writing a prescription for an Epi-Pen for someone who asked for it before???

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    My doctor wouldn't write me one. Told me to see an allergist.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Liberty, Indiana, USA
    Posts
    167

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by LeonardS View Post
    I asked my Doctor about an Epi Pen when I had my physical a month ago. He said he couldnt write a prescription for me unless I was allergic to bee venom. How did you get your Doctors to go along with getting you an Epi Pen?
    I would get a new doctor. I am a pharmacist in Indiana. I have never heard of a doc doing anything like that. I would ask that doctor what you are supposed to do if you have a reaction and don't have an epi-pen?
    Jason Bruns
    LetMBee.com YouTube

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Crenshaw County, Alabama
    Posts
    1,998

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by LetMBee View Post
    I would get a new doctor. I am a pharmacist in Indiana. I have never heard of a doc doing anything like that. I would ask that doctor what you are supposed to do if you have a reaction and don't have an epi-pen?
    Or ask the Doctor what he's going to do when your widow's lawyers contact him regarding your demise from an allergic reaction to be stings and he *didn't* give you the epi-pen prescription that you asked for??

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    San Juan County, WA
    Posts
    38

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by LeonardS View Post
    I asked my Doctor about an Epi Pen when I had my physical a month ago. He said he couldnt write a prescription for me unless I was allergic to bee venom. How did you get your Doctors to go along with getting you an Epi Pen?
    If I were you, I'd tell that doctor that I'd just remembered getting stung five years ago and breaking out in hives all over my body. Making up a fake story for the doctor won't have any effect on his future treatment of you, and it might just keep you safe by doing an end-run around his stupid protocol and getting your epipen.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Liberty, Indiana, USA
    Posts
    167

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    I have a pen, and I am not allergic. I have it just in case anyone wants to come along on hive inspections. Very few people are that allergic to bees, in fact I think the fear is over-blown. If it ever does happen you need to be ready. We had a local man get stung two years ago.... He didn't make it to the emergency room. So fib if you need to. It's good to have one around.
    Jason Bruns
    LetMBee.com YouTube

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Arlee MT USA
    Posts
    548

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    Making up a fake story for the doctor won't have any effect on his future treatment of you, and it might just keep you safe by doing an end-run around his stupid protocol and getting your epipen.
    I understand where you guys are coming from but I can also understand the doctors point of view. Epi is severely over prescribed. For every twenty calls my ambulance we gets for a bee sting reaction one may actually be legitimate. We get a lot more calls for people who accidentally inject themselves with epi and are having problems than people who need it to save there lives. I can understand completely why a doctor wouldn't want to give it out on a "just in case" basis. "Just in case" medications create millions of dollars worth of health care expenses and many deaths every year.

    Epi is not without side effects and carries a risk of stroke and cardiac failure. Also, an accidental injection into a finger can cause the blood vessels to severely constrict and often leads to the loss of that finger. I have actually seen this happen with a seven year old boy who got ahold of his mothers epi pen.

    Doctors are not in the habit (or should not be!) of giving out any type of prescription for potentially dangerous drugs without a good reason. If you think you need a epi pen rather than lying about your medical history I would talk about the following factors with him.


    Family history? if you have a family history of sever allergic reactions it may make you more likely to have one. There is not conclusive evidence for this but it may be enough to convince the doctor.

    Where you live? If you live an hour away from the nearest hospital (like I do) that could be a good justification for keeping epi nearby. If you live in town and the nearest ambulance is five minutes away you probably don't need one.

    Your personal competence. Insist that you will only use it for emergencies and that you know exactly when and how it should be used.

    The other thing to remember is that doctors nurses and EMT's are in the habit of being constantly lied to by our patients. We expect it, and we are trained to detect it and there is a good chance that if you are lying we will figure it out and that WILL effect your future credibility (even though it really shouldn't, but hey, we're human too) If you really want an epi pen then the best course would be to actually follow your doctors advice and go see an allergist. Having one on hand is a good idea, but you really need to know how and when to use it. Its not something to take "just in case."
    Last edited by Aerindel; 04-18-2012 at 02:22 PM.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads