Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 31 of 31

Thread: 8 frame or 10

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Calvert, Md,USA
    Posts
    1,709

    Default Re: 8 frame or 10

    I'm starting to cut my 10 frames to 8. My lower back told me to do this Probably just my imagination, but the width of my arms to pick up a 10 vs less for an 8 seems to make a difference in balance. I "forge" my own stuff with the exception of frames so cost does not really enter into it. If I injure the back again, I may cut them the other way and make em meds.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Indianapolis IN 46227
    Posts
    289

    Default Re: 8 frame or 10

    I'm using 8 frame foundationless deeps with 9 true 1 1/4" frames. An idea I picked up from M Bush's site. The bees seem to like it and so do I. Having a previous 14 years with the bees, I would have not believed they could work so fast on foundationless without seeing it in action. Thanks Michael!

    Just an observation; I had 20 sheets of foundation, so I put one in 20 hives. My check last week revealed the bees were still favoring making their own wax and hardly touching the foundation. I have read bees show no preference to foundation, now I can attest to it.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Danbury, CT
    Posts
    2,863

    Default Re: 8 frame or 10

    Maybe I will cut everything down to 5 frames... That will make them really light.
    Always question Conventional Wisdom.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Evansville, IN
    Posts
    2,227

    Default Re: 8 frame or 10

    The biggest difference is the weight. I don't think the bees notice all that much. However, there is probably a minimum size of hive space below which the bees will survive just fine but not make any surplus -- think a ten gallon space as optimum, plus whatever super space the bees will be filling with honey for the beekeeper.

    A stack of nuc boxes is going to be rather unstable once you get five or six stacked up.......

    After heaving a full deep, I'm making thinking noises about mediums for the brood nest, although I'm still leaning toward shallows for honey. Still using 10 frame.

    I do recommend 8 frame equipment for the several women who have expressed an interest in beekeeping, on the principle that smaller, late middle aged people might not want to try to wrestle 95 lb boxes at shoulder height.

    I've noticed, from pictures, that "standard" European hives tend to be more square and shorter than the Langstroth -- I would guess something like 16" x 16" rather than 20" x 16". I'm sure the dimensions are around somewhere, I've not looked in detail.

    Good thing it really doesn't matter what you use -- the bees will be happy if you make boxes sizes other than standard Langstroth. The only thing I would not do is use all shallows, simply because I think the bees prefer a deeper brood area, but I'm also sure someone is, and getting good results. After all, bees are well known to inhabit the space between floors in houses quite nicely, making the comb just about a shallow in depth!

    Once I get established, I may try some experiments -- 11.5" deeps for single brood boxes, square hives instead of rectangular, and so forth. Not that big a deal to make any size equipment I want for me, as interchangeability is a minor concern as a hobbyist. In a commercial operation, I'd stick with standard sizes, of course, unless I wanted to make commercial quantities of frames and boxes!

    Peter

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    1,972

    Default Re: 8 frame or 10

    8's.
    My top bar hives are entering their third season, and 8 frame langs are starting this season.

    I'm using narrow frames for the brood - in deeps. Regular frames in the honey supers - in mediums.

    We'll see how it goes.

    Adam

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Spicewood, TX, USA
    Posts
    375

    Default Re: 8 frame or 10

    I used all 10 frame last year, my 1st. I have deeps for brood and mediums for supers. I decided that I wanted all deeps for continuity, but don't cherish the idea of lifting 100 lbs into my retirement years, even at 230 lbs. For some reason 80 lbs seems much more manageable to me and running all deeps still gives me the flexibility to buy or sell a standard nucs. All my frames will be the same, just a matter of 5 or 8 frames. Since this is just my 2nd year, and I'm still in the experimental stages, everything is subject to change.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Reidsville, NC
    Posts
    114

    Default Re: 8 frame or 10

    Quote Originally Posted by cheryl anne View Post
    if i understood you correctly i should put 2 frames with foundation and an empty foundationless frame in between so they will build correctly.
    cheryl anne
    Cheryl, if you do not have any drawn comb, the foundation may help a little, but odds are you will be doing some trimming to get it fixed(easy to do and the bees will fix it after you tear it up). Drawn comb is the best guide, you just sandwich the foundationless between those two: CEC.
    Experience is better than theory.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,508

    Default Re: 8 frame or 10

    >Maybe I will cut everything down to 5 frames... That will make them really light.

    And tip over easily...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Calvert, Md,USA
    Posts
    1,709

    Default Re: 8 frame or 10

    LOL
    Just me but I think I detected a note of sarcasm in the "cut down to five frames" comment. Six would work better

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Danbury, CT
    Posts
    2,863

    Default Re: 8 frame or 10

    Yes my sarcasm doesn't project well on a form.

    The reality is we cannot really change the weight in beekeeping... The hive as a whole weighs what it weighs. The narrower and shallower you make the boxes the higher you have to go with them... Sometimes distributing the weight higher isn't the best answer.

    For the majority of us on here we are only handling a few hives. The big and middle size operations all use bobcats and swingers for the heavy lifting. If you are not healthy enough to move a couple of 80 lb boxes, once or twice a year, you may want to consult your physician before taking up beekeeping.

    I use to operate a Sawmill and that was hard work, bad on your joints, hard on your back... I received multiple injuries... My solution wasn't to mill smaller trees. That would require the same amount of work to mill and stack 1000 BF... I sold the sawmill.
    Always question Conventional Wisdom.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Calvert, Md,USA
    Posts
    1,709

    Default Re: 8 frame or 10

    I had a portable sawmill,, Woodmizer HD40. Was great when I had help. I can identify somewhat. I sold mine as well.
    It very well may be the weight is the weight. If it comes to that, then I'll have to remove frame at a time. I can walk a long way,,,, I just can't pull a wagon with 500 lbs in it
    It's all good.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads