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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Akron, Ohio
    Posts
    31

    Default New to Swarm Catching

    I have two colonies that overwintered. They both have brood and are doing well. I saw capped drone brood in one and drone larva in the other (don't think there were any queen cells - definitely none that were capped). I put a deep with drawn comb in between my two existing hives and wiped in the inside with a swarm lure. My question is...is my "trap" too close to my hives? Will this cause a problem? If a swarm would happen to make it their new home, can I move it away from my existing colonies? I haven't done this before...thanks for any suggestions.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    2,294

    Default Re: New to Swarm Catching

    I've had swarms move right in to an empty box a foot away from one of my hives. I think hive activity attracts swarms. You can always move them later.
    President, San Francisco Beekeepers Association
    www.habitatforhoneybees.org

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    berkley county, WV
    Posts
    432

    Default Re: New to Swarm Catching

    my only suggestion on moving it is. Is it too close for you to work your existing hives? as long as it is out of the way far enough for that, I wouldn't worry...
    welcome to your new addiction!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Akron, Ohio
    Posts
    31

    Default Re: New to Swarm Catching

    Thanks! Yes, it is out of the way of my two existing hives. I am excited to see if it works. I have the space to move the hives farther apart if needed. The comb in the bait hive is really dark. I have heard that is a good attractant.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    knoxville, tn
    Posts
    564

    Default Re: New to Swarm Catching

    On trap outs there is a minimum of 6 round trips to the site.................
    1. just to look and see what is involved and if you even what to do the job
    2. set up the trap out and spend a couple hours looking for other entrances/exits and plugging them off
    3. a week later to look for a queen cell
    4. couple weeks later to see if the queen is laying
    5. removal of the trap cone and spend a couple hours watching to see if pollen is being brought back into the old hive
    6. after old hive is robbed out, retrieving the bait hive.

    That is the bare minimum and if anything goes astray add more trips in there ie. no queen cell, no laying queen, new entrance/exit holes, bees did not get trapped out of wall and have to put cone back on, hive in wall is huge and have to make a couple extra trips to change out bait hive.

    Most times I do like to make a couple extra trips to make sure things are going right if they are close enough. Figure your mileage and time and then put a value on it. That is just the bare minimum to charge. Don't forget the time spent to load all of your junk in the truck, rob out a frame of eggs and build some kind of make shift stand or platform for the bait hive to sit on.

    By the time you do the second one you will know how to price them and explain to the customer why they cost so much. I always ask what it would cost just for them to drive all the way to my house and back once a week for two months, gets them to thinking a little bit.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Calhoun Co, Texas, USA
    Posts
    1,311

    Default Re: New to Swarm Catching

    Quote Originally Posted by G3farms View Post
    On trap outs there is a minimum of 6 round trips to the site.................
    How does that have ANYTHING to do with this thread?
    (I'm starting to think we have a troll among us)

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