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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Johnson,Missouri,USA
    Posts
    25

    Default Walnut tree trap-out

    Started a trap-out yesterday morning. The folks didn't want to kill the bees, but they feed the squirrels on that tree and the bees have been getting after the tree rats. They were very excited with the possibility of removing the bees to a new home without damaging the tree. My first attempt and will be adding a frame of open brood later as Mr. Hogan has suggested.

    http://s1173.photobucket.com/albums/...rapout%202012/

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    fairfield,ohio
    Posts
    674

    Default Re: Walnut tree trap-out

    A10,I'm familiar with Mr Hogans design.I did'nt see if you were allowing them to leave thru the front of the hive to forage? Nice Pics thanks for sharing.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Dell Rapids, SD
    Posts
    146

    Default Re: Walnut tree trap-out

    Awesome pics! Thanks for sharing.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Johnson,Missouri,USA
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: Walnut tree trap-out

    Quote Originally Posted by ken rice View Post
    A10,I'm familiar with Mr Hogans design.I did'nt see if you were allowing them to leave thru the front of the hive to forage? Nice Pics thanks for sharing.
    Yep, there is a 3/8" opening the width of the hive body at the landing board.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Orinda, California, USA
    Posts
    99

    Default Re: Walnut tree trap-out

    Love that design. I like the bracket support and the thick foam is ingenious! So much better than messing around with duct tape!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Johnson,Missouri,USA
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: Walnut tree trap-out

    Yeah, those old couch cushions came in handy. The foam compressed nicely and molded around all the rough edges.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Springfield, MO, USA
    Posts
    102

    Default Re: Walnut tree trap-out

    This looks great! Nice clean construction. The foam was really using your head. I encourage you to share these photos with Cleo Hogan. I think he'd be proud of how his design has been used here.

    Would you let us know if the queen comes out into the bait box?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,899

    Default Re: Walnut tree trap-out

    I am proud any time people help bees, and bees help people.

    cchoganjr

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Livermore, CA
    Posts
    1,403

    Default Re: Walnut tree trap-out

    Very cool pics A10!! Hope everything works out good for ya!!
    Coyote Creek Bees

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Johnson,Missouri,USA
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: Walnut tree trap-out

    Will do! I am going to add a frame of open brood this afternoon.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Massachusets, Bristol County
    Posts
    39

    Default Re: Walnut tree trap-out

    Extremly impressive technique. i have to do simulat to a pine tree. the soft foam is a great way to seal off the entrance. thanks for the idea. very nice job hope it works out. again inpressed. jeff

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Johnson,Missouri,USA
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: Walnut tree trap-out

    Checked the box today 24 hours after introducing open brood. Bees have moved our and covered the brood but did not see the queen today. I have a screen trap ready to install if I can catch her out and about.

    http://s1173.photobucket.com/albums/...view=slideshow

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,899

    Default Re: Walnut tree trap-out

    If you don't get the queen in the next 24 hours, cut the end bar (and a chunk of the comb) out of a couple of deep brood combs, so that the frames will wrap around the transition from the tree, then fill the trap with frames, combs if you have them, if not foundation. When you do this, the combs are aligned just like any colony. She will start using the trap as another brood chamber.

    If I am just taking starts, (not trying to eliminate the colony) I reset the transition so that it does not come totally inside the trap, so that I can place frames just like in any hive. My transitions are held in place by two screws and can be adjusted. Since your trap is already in place,(and occupied) this would not be feasible on this trapout.

    Thanks for the photos. Good job. Have you trapped before.

    Here is the link to my photobucket. Look at the photo labeled Horse Cave Trap. It shows the comb butting up against the trap end.

    http://s841.photobucket.com/albums/z...t=100_2201.jpg

    cchoganjr
    Last edited by Cleo C. Hogan Jr; 03-30-2012 at 05:32 AM. Reason: spelling

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Johnson,Missouri,USA
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: Walnut tree trap-out

    Thanks for the helpful information. This is the first time I have tried this. You emailed me pictures and information a while back, so I used that to come up with what I used. I think I can still slide the hive body away from the transition if needed so that it is flush and could fill with frames. I could definitely modify a few frames to wrap around the transition. Thank you again for sharing your knowledge and experience so freely.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,899

    Default Re: Walnut tree trap-out

    Glad to help.

    cchoganjr

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Hiram, OH
    Posts
    117

    Default Re: Walnut tree trap-out

    A10fuelfxr,

    Forgive my newbee confusion, but the descriptions I've read of trapout systems before have always included some type of cone-shaped exit from the tree that prevents the bees from getting back in to their native hive. I don't see that in your design. What incentive do the bees have in this case to stay in the new hive instead of returning home? The open brood you placed in the new hive?
    “Unthinking respect for authority is the greatest enemy of truth.” – Albert Einstein

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,899

    Default Re: Walnut tree trap-out

    Ricky Bee... The cone funnel method for trapping is a time honored, true, and tested concept for trapping bees. It's limitation is that you have virtually zero chance of getting a queen using the cone funnel, and normally it takes longer for a trapout The method that I use gives you a very good chance of getting the queen, and you can take starts in 24 to 36 hours of introduction of the unsealed brood. Look at his photos of bees after 24 hours. Very nice photos..

    The incentive is that the trap is another integral part of their hive. They move into it for extra room, a place to lay eggs and a place to store honey, nectar, and pollen. It is the introduction of the unsealed brood that causes the queen to investigate the new chamber, and she will move back and forth between the feral source and the trap. The brood brings out nurse bees, fanners, cleaners, just what you need to make a good start.

    If you close off the tunnel, all bees have to come through the small funnel and then cannot get back to the feral source.

    Hope this helps.

    cchoganjr

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,899

    Default Re: Walnut tree trap-out

    A10fuelfxr...I just viewed your photos. Very impressive. Are you sure you did not have the queen. Look at your 3d photo. I can't tell for sure, but that sure looks like the queen in the right side of the photo, near the middle. I tried to enlarge but it distorted. It sure looks like her.

    cchoganjr

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Hiram, OH
    Posts
    117

    Default Re: Walnut tree trap-out

    Great explanation. Thanks!
    “Unthinking respect for authority is the greatest enemy of truth.” – Albert Einstein

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,899

    Default Re: Walnut tree trap-out

    Ricky Bee...Others.... I am often asked if you are just wanting to take starts, not eliminate the colony, then why not just use that frame of unsealed brood you take from one of your hives, and do a split. And that is a good question.

    In this method, you do take a frame of unsealed brood from one of your hives, but, you don't take any bees from your hives. In making a split. you have to take a frame or two of brood,and a frame or two of bees. Your hive only sacrifices one frame of brood, no bees. Additionally it is not uncommon to get 5 to 10 pounds of bees in your trap in 24 to 48 hours if you have a good tree that is strong. That many bees can build up rapidly and make you a good hive quickly.

    cchoganjr

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