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Thread: What to do now?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Willow Spring, N.C. USA
    Posts
    93

    Default What to do now?

    Been trying to keep bees for years now. Had them freeze, starve over winter, devastated by wax moths twice...
    Had a wild swarm move in, produced 150 # of honey. I split it with a new queen. The second hive got wax moths because I didn't put an entrance
    reducer on it. UGH!!

    Last year, I walk-away split the one I had left and the weaker hive (no SBB) froze or something. There was honey in the hive.
    The 'other' hive (SBB) is booming.

    I want/need honey, but I want to split. But at this point, I'm afraid to do anything.
    I have a deep brood chamber, one full medium with capped honey and a medium that's almost full, honey not capped.
    It will need a new medium super soon.

    Do I split? When?
    When can I take the honey? After they have a hundred pounds?
    When the 1 Great Scorer comes To write against your name, He marks not that you won or lost But how you played the Game.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Palm Bay, FL, USA
    Posts
    2,297

    Default Re: What to do now?

    Coach; you don't get wax moth devastations in a strong hive! The bees keep them under control. There are wax moths in every hive in existence, they don't have to fly in, so an entrance reducer has zero effect on wax moths. At this point you have 2 choices; 1. let them continue to grow the one hive for honey production; 2. Split them and hope for a successful split plus some hopeful honey production. Another better choice would be to buy a nuc from someone local and let them both build up and possibly get honey off both hives this year. You need 2 hives so that resources can be shared, like moving brood around to strengthen a weak hive, or providing eggs for a queenless hive. Asking for 100 lbs of honey from a single hive is iffy at best! May I also ask, are you sure you're fighting wax moths or are they Small Hive Beetles? You're in the South, SHB are prevalent.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Willow Spring, N.C. USA
    Posts
    93

    Default Re: What to do now?

    Hey Fish,
    Definitely Wax moths. Gray creepy worms that attach frames together with spider-like webbing.
    I haven't seen any moths or web in the hive. I do have some beetles in there though. I put a trap in with some veggie oil and
    now its full. Need to replace it with a fresh one and oil.
    The 150 lbs, was what it produced spring before last. No myth. And it over wintered fine. I just can't get it to split.
    If I do split it, I will def. use a screened bottom board for the new hive too. The two failed attempts were both in older hardware, no SBB.

    Are there any dates to keep in mind for splitting? Not before June 1...?
    When the 1 Great Scorer comes To write against your name, He marks not that you won or lost But how you played the Game.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Pope, AR, USA
    Posts
    126

    Default Re: What to do now?

    He is right wax moths are only scavengers like hive beetles that are always flying into hives. Their eggs get carried out by healthy hives all the time. Wax does not rot so hive beetles and wax moths are necessary to empty out old abandoned bee tree comb that has cells too small to raise bees in anymore and has too many drone cells eventually as well. Without these wax eaters all the empty hollow trees would be stuffed with nasty black combs with tiny cells clogged with hundreds of leftover baby bee cocoons........NOW the real problem VARROA DESTRUCTOR It is why the trees remain empty and hollow and is not a part of the ecosystem.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pikeville North Carolina
    Posts
    397

    Default Re: What to do now?

    You want honey and you want to split, can't have both. Decide if you want spring honey or fall honey. If you want spring honey add suppers when needed forget the split until after the flow. (queens will be cheaper and more available then as well) If you prefer the fall honey, split the hive and hope we don't have a summer like we did last year.
    An empty wagon rattles the loudest.

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