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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Clinton, Illinois
    Posts
    91

    Sad Creamed honey frustrations

    Nearly all my creamed honey has developed some unsightly white stuff on the top. This happened as well last year but this year it seems to have affected about 90% of my containers. Tastes like creamed honey but no one will want to buy this if I can't explain what it is, even if I were to take to market.

    Frustrating. Any ideas? And how to prevent? This batch did settle out a while before I put in containers so I don't think it's a situation where I didn't allow this to rise out. I think it's something that occurs in the granulation process.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camas, WA
    Posts
    1,918

    Default Re: Creamed honey frustrations

    Mine does that too. I sell out every year and every year I make more. No one has ever asked about it to my knowledge. It isn't thick, just a whitish thin layer. I always thought that it was probably air bubbles still slowly making their way to the top.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Ft. Collins, Colorado
    Posts
    518

    Default Re: Creamed honey frustrations

    Sounds like some of the foam left from when you whipped/stirred the honey. I usually wait 24 hours after that and scrape off the foam or air bubbles that have risen to the top. Sometimes there's a little left that goes into the jars as they are filled and you can see a streak or two. Shouldn't be a problem as far as taste. Up to you and your customers whether it's unsightly or not.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Acampo, CA
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Creamed honey frustrations

    Mine does that as well. No complaints and no questions.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Oregon City, Oregon
    Posts
    988

    Default Re: Creamed honey frustrations

    This is why most creamed honey sold in the U.S. is in white plastic containers. Back in the old..days it was in jars and it could be difficult to sell to a public that may be ignorant as to what it is, which is just natural sugar crystals forming on the parts exposed to any air, but many non knowers swear that your creamed honey has molded....
    Honeydew

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camas, WA
    Posts
    1,918

    Default Re: Creamed honey frustrations

    I have actually started selling mine in jars. You can't see the white film at the top but you can see the rest of the product. I was told not to do it but I put mine in pint canning jars for my personal use and they looked just fine so now I sell in jars.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Anthony, New Mexico USA
    Posts
    414

    Default Re: Creamed honey frustrations

    What’s the best way to start producing creamed honey?
    I have seen the advertised starting kits at beekeeping catalogs, but, is this the way to go?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,339

    Default Re: Creamed honey frustrations

    I just mix in the seed (some smooth creamed honey) and set it on the window sill in winter and it turns out perfect...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Worcester County, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,539

    Default Re: Creamed honey frustrations

    ...it may have fermented a.bit. When honey starts to crystallize, the liquid part that hasn't yet crystallized can go higher in moisture (as it is shed from the crystallized portion) ......honey that would not.ferment when all liquid can ferment when partially crystallized. If you apologize for.it, your customers will.consider it spoiled......if you explain,.embrace, and give tastes it is a "feature".
    Deknow

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camas, WA
    Posts
    1,918

    Default Re: Creamed honey frustrations

    I don't think that there is any fermentation going on although I understand how it could. That's why the Dyce method suggests heating the liquid honey to 150 degrees before mixing. I have done that in the past, but now I just blend the raw honey. It is very difficult to not get air blended into the honey when mixing seed and liquid honey. I started using a dough hook since it seemed to add less air. My creamed honey is pretty set up (I can set a jar on its side and notice a slight bulge) in a week. I think that it is just the air at the surface of the creamed honey being released.

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