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Thread: Queen excluders

  1. #61
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    Default Re: Queen excluders

    Ace,

    Queen catchers are pretty safe but there is a little finesse that has to be used. This season practice on some drones while your hives are open. You'll get more confident the more you use it.
    President, San Francisco Beekeepers Association
    www.habitatforhoneybees.org

  2. #62
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    Default Re: Queen excluders

    Quote Originally Posted by Lauri View Post
    Nice tips here I will refer to this summer.
    Yes, I have to agree. Good tips I haven't heard before.
    President, San Francisco Beekeepers Association
    www.habitatforhoneybees.org

  3. #63
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    havana fl
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    Default Re: Queen excluders

    Quote Originally Posted by theriverhawk View Post
    Ace,
    Instead, folks come on here and make blanket, unsupported statements like, "You will get more honey without excluders."
    I stated my opinion. You will get more honey without excluders. I don't disagree with your observations they are your observations and when stated here they are your opinions. There are many references listed early that are pro and con all are someone’s observations and opinions. They could all be referred to as blanket statements. Some say you will get more honey some say it makes no difference. Why do ya think your observations and statements are more valid than anyone else. It's still your opinion.
    I’m really not that serious

  4. #64

    Cool Re: Queen excluders

    I am just a honey producer and run my hives in a single deep. For every excluder that fails it cost me about $100, because I can't harvest honey with brood in it. Everyone runs there operation differently, but for me excludes all the way.
    7 year honey avg. 127 lb per hive.

  5. #65
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    Default Re: Queen excluders

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie B View Post
    Ace,

    Queen catchers are pretty safe but there is a little finesse that has to be used. This season practice on some drones while your hives are open. You'll get more confident the more you use it.
    Hey Charlie, that is a good idea. I never though of practicing with drones. Thanks.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  6. #66
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    Default Re: Queen excluders

    It took me some time to feel like I had a handle on the queen excluder as well as several other aspects of beekeeping but now I really like the queen excluder. Once I locate the queen I like to keep her in the bottom box so that I know where she is most of all. I also like to be able to know specifically where the fresh brood and eggs will be along with her. since I know where the queen is it makes inspections less tricky because I don't have to wonder which box she is in. Once the bottom box starts jamming with like 4 or 5 frames of brood in a ten frame box I move two frames of brood up into the box above the excluder leaving the queen below and either add in two undrawn frames of two empty combs for the queen to lay in. This seems to have worked well for me last year. The bees didn't swarm, they drew plenty of foundation, I felt comfortable when looking through my hives and having the queen excluder saved me time when I needed to take some frames of brood to make splits or shake nurse bees into my cell starter and things like that. My honey production was okay not incredible but I don't think that the queen excluder hurt how much the bees produced. I think that the bees won't go up into a completely empty box as readily if there is an excluder between it and the brood chamber but leaving the excluder off until there is some wax being drawn or bringing some frames of brood up above the excluder seems to remedy that. I think that is the part that a new beekeeper may not quite grasp because they are trying to find the queen and my even be overwhelmed by getting stung and identifying drone comb and brood comb and bee bread etc. It was a bit overwhelming for me the first year and I ended up with brood scattered around the hive and I had my feeder lid come off and my bees got robbed and drown and I was not very good as I learned the hard way. Part of that first year of making mistakes was what pushed me to join beesource and re examine the basics and really try to understand more clearly what I could do to improve. Taking a class on Queen Rearing and pulling off some grafting and getting to see the work of some of the beekeepers on here that I think of as the best I can find has been awesome. I am off topic but I would like to salute Od Frank, Mike Palmer, Michael Bush, Mark, Crazy Roland, Katarina, WWW, Barry, Lauri, Charlie, Ace, Joseph Clemens, Big props. A rating to David Laferney!!! Big Props to Oldtimer, Ray Marler, Tasmanites, A rating to Vance G, There are more but I am just really grateful to be part of this forum that has changed my life.

    Other beekeepers helped me wrap my head around using an excluder but in conjunction with what Ace had mentioned it did take me a bit of time to get a handle on using one. In my case it did take some time to get it. When I found info on the Demaree method of Swarm Prevention that put a light over my head as far as moving combs around in the hive and using an excluder. It's a PDF but I think that this will take you to it. It's the country rubes link

    http://search.yahoo.com/search;_ylt=...8&fr=yfp-t-900


    Demaree Technique was never mentioned in our bee group But I will be including it as hand out for the bee course this year. I found the Demaree method on line and provided a newer beekeeper could understand using the Demaree technique it may help them use an excluder if they wanted to do that. I once tried to extract a frame that was mostly honey but had a little drone brood in it and it was not pretty. Larvae went in the honey. I didn't make that rookie mistake again. I also had a queen lay eggs in my Ross Rounds and that was not pleasant so for me using the excluder is something that I now really enjoy. I like the wooden bound metal excluders because you can torch the wax off of them if they start to get clogged with wax and they are easy to spot between the hives. The plastic ones sometimes get stuck in such a way that when I try to take them off they slap back on the bees and agitate them. They are less expensive so I do have some plus you can cut them for making queen confinement things and stuff so they have plenty of value but for just putting between the boxes I like the wood bound metal ones. They are expensive but anyway. That's a bit of my thoughts on using them. It took me some time but I really like them at this phase of my beekeeping mindset.

    Off topic but I love this video Thanks for posting this od

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWujz...sLorf8olIvQeog

  7. #67
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    Default Re: Queen excluders

    Another enlightened convert. Congrats on sifting through all the negativity and welcome to the QE club.
    Horseshoe Point Honey -- http://localvahoney.com/

  8. #68
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    Default Re: Queen excluders

    Here is a direct link to the "Demaree Swarm Prevention" PDF document Virginiawolf referenced in post #66:

    http://countryrubes.com/images/Swarm...ree_Method.pdf
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  9. #69
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    Default Re: Queen excluders

    Hey VW............ congrats for coming over from the "Dark Side!"

    I use QE and love em.

  10. #70
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    Default Re: Queen excluders

    Thanks Virginiawolf for a very enlightened post and thanks to all those who have given us an insight into their many years of experience in the use of queen excluders, I consider them a very useful tool in beekeeping when used properly, I wouldn't beekeep without them.
    Bill...in Southeast Ohio

  11. #71
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    Default Re: Queen excluders

    Good post Virginia Wolf, you convey the excitement and confusion and mistakes that most of us made when we were new at beekeeping, and you give insight and hope for those who are new at it now.

    You mentioned about not being able to find a queen well as a new beek when trying to use a queen excluder. I must say, having the queen end up on the wrong side of a queen excluder can be a frustrating problem, to say the least. So, here is how to prevent that very easily. Any frames that you want to move up above the queen excluder, give them a good shake down into the bottom broodnest box or boxes before moving it up above the excluder. This will knock off the bees and queen for you. A few bees may still be on the frame, but so few that it is then much easier to spot a queen if she is there. She usually is not there, she is usually one of the first to fall down off the frame. Once the frame is then placed above the excluder, bees will then come up through the excluder to manage that frame as they need to.

  12. #72
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    Default Re: Queen excluders

    Quote Originally Posted by virginiawolf View Post
    I am off topic but I would like to salute Od Frank, Mike Palmer, Michael Bush, Mark, Crazy Roland, Katarina, WWW, Barry, Lauri, Charlie, Ace, Joseph Clemens, Big props. A rating to David Laferney!!! Big Props to Oldtimer, Ray Marler, Tasmanites, A rating to Vance G, There are more but I am just really grateful to be part of this forum that has changed my life.

    Other beekeepers helped me wrap my head around using an excluder but in conjunction with what Ace had mentioned it did take me a bit of time to get a handle on usi]
    2013 "Post of the Year"

  13. #73
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    Dec 2013
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    Booneville, Mississippi
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    58

    Default Re: Queen excluders

    From what the guys in my Bee Club all said! The excluder cuts back honey making ........
    I am a new guy buy don't intend on using it!

  14. #74
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    Default Re: Queen excluders

    Quote Originally Posted by labradorfarms View Post
    The excluder cuts back honey making ........
    I am a new guy buy don't intend on using it!
    Uh, the Guinness world record for honey production from a single hive is held by someone who used Queen Excluders........nuff said....

  15. #75
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    Default Re: Queen excluders

    Quote Originally Posted by snl View Post
    Uh, the Guinness world record for honey production from a single hive is held by someone who used Queen Excluders........nuff said....
    Not! How about from his whole apiary?

    The QE has a purpose, to restrict the queen from laying in a box you the beekeeper doesn't want. It is a beekeeper manipulation so the honey yield will be more dependent on how the beekeeper uses it than the bees. I haven't heard one beekeeper except for you, suggest that it is used to increase honey yield. Most will say it can decrease the expansion of the hive and therefore lower honey yield. If the foragers have to pass through it each and every time it is is sure thing it will decrease honey yield. Many people use upper entrances to avoid that problem.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  16. #76
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    Default Re: Queen excluders

    Quote Originally Posted by Acebird View Post
    Not! How about from his whole apiary?

    The QE has a purpose, to restrict the queen from laying in a box you the beekeeper doesn't want. It is a beekeeper manipulation so the honey yield will be more dependent on how the beekeeper uses it than the bees. I haven't heard one beekeeper except for you, suggest that it is used to increase honey yield. Most will say it can decrease the expansion of the hive and therefore lower honey yield. If the foragers have to pass through it each and every time it is is sure thing it will decrease honey yield. Many people use upper entrances to avoid that problem.
    So, is honey yield more dependent on how the beekeeper uses the excluder, or whether or not you use an excluder, which one, you can't have it both ways.

  17. #77
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    Default Re: Queen excluders

    It's always dependent on the beekeeper whether you use an excluder or not if you are doing comparisons.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  18. #78
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    Default Re: Queen excluders

    Quote Originally Posted by Acebird View Post
    I haven't heard one beekeeper except for you, suggest that it is used to increase honey yield.
    Well, you don't have to look very far to find a beekeeper that disagrees. Besides SNL, there is a similar comment regarding excluder use by The Honey Householder in post #64 above in this thread. It should be easy to find, since Ace made post #65.
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  19. #79
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    Default Re: Queen excluders

    Ok Ace, what generally produces more honey, using an excluder or not using one? If using an excluder, which produces more honey, how the beekeeper uses it, or, how he doesn't use it? If not using an excluder, which produces more honey, how the beekeeper doesn't use it, or, how the bees like not having an excluder?

  20. #80
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    Default Re: Queen excluders

    Quote Originally Posted by Rader Sidetrack View Post
    Well, you don't have to look very far to find a beekeeper that disagrees. Besides SNL, there is a similar comment regarding excluder use by The Honey Householder in post #64 above in this thread. It should be easy to find, since Ace made post #65.
    He is not saying the bees don't produce the honey he is saying he can't harvest it for human consumption.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

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