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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Nashua, NH, USA
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    58

    Default Including treatment free aspects in demonstrations to general public

    I'm going to be doing six bee demonstrations at public locations where I've placed adopted hives (i.e. community gardens.)

    Any pointers on presenting the aspects of no treatment beekeeping to the public who have general bee interest.


    Kagen
    Hive At Your Home
    6 days to go!
    http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...ome-honey-bees

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    45,379

    Default Re: Including treatment free aspects in demonstrations to general public

    The idea that beekeeping is already natural is firmly planted in people's minds. What you propose is sort of like telling a five year old the truth about Santa Clause...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    26,200

    Default Re: Including treatment free aspects in demonstrations to general public

    I like Michaels' way of putting it.

    Tell people about bees and beekeeping. Leave specific nuances to the question and answer period or individual discussion.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Nashua, NH, USA
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    Default Re: Including treatment free aspects in demonstrations to general public

    I'm mostly wondering as people are going to ask about "saving the bees, aren't they dieing, what about CCD." The general public so far has a little interest in the process of beekeeping, but a lot of concern about dead bees due to all the movies, news and stuff. Its kinda of like when a 5 year old asks why Santa didn't visit his house, there is a conundrum in what to say or not. Because they are going to ask about "Santa".

    More seriously, is it really a good thing that the public has "The idea that beekeeping is already natural is firmly planted in" their minds? I see that their are advantages to this but is that fair for treatment-free beekeepers? If I say there is no difference, everything is the same how can I then I say by the way I'd like a price adjustment on my honey as there is a difference from it and Chinese store stuff, or please get involved in this project putting local treatment free bees in your community? Maybe the public shouldn't be kept as malluably 5-year olds. Maybe thats the biggest issue.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
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    3,027

    Default Re: Including treatment free aspects in demonstrations to general public

    I get that CCD question in every beginner class, and someone else always knows the answer . It's cell phones, or pesticides, or herbicides, or langstroth beekeepers. Since this isn't a beekeeper-focused audience, I'd keep it brief and factual and if people ask about "chemicals", talk about how wax absorbs many things from its environment but many beekeepers (presumably yourself included) are exploring ways such as IPM or treatment-free (which requires a definition) to improve the health of your bees. Or talk about pesticide misuse and how they can help.
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Nashua, NH, USA
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    58

    Default Re: Including treatment free aspects in demonstrations to general public

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Brewcat View Post
    I get that CCD question in every beginner class, and someone else always knows the answer . It's cell phones, or pesticides, or herbicides, or langstroth beekeepers. Since this isn't a beekeeper-focused audience, I'd keep it brief and factual and if people ask about "chemicals", talk about how wax absorbs many things from its environment but many beekeepers (presumably yourself included) are exploring ways such as IPM or treatment-free (which requires a definition) to improve the health of your bees. Or talk about pesticide misuse and how they can help.
    Makes sense, I want to stay away from hysteria. I actually like the USDA description of CCD I used that link to explain CDD on my kickstarter funding as everywhere else claims to know the answer, or that the end of the world for bees is coinciding with the end of the Mayan calender. Others on kickstarter probably did themselves a favor by whipping up fear and saying save the bees and here's a link to how bees are dying, but I don't claim to have the answer and didn't feel comfortable even if that is what is expected.

    So the USDA on CCD:
    http://www.ars.usda.gov/News/docs.htm?docid=15572
    "Since little is known about the cause(s) of CCD right now, mitigation must be based on improving general honey bee health and habitat and countering known mortality factors by using best management practices."

    Factual, not hysterical, useful decent advice for beekeeping even if you replace the word CCD with any bee malady.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    26,200

    Default Re: Including treatment free aspects in demonstrations to general public

    A. Of the 30% dieback in all managed colonies, only 5% was CCD related. Which points out that squeaky wheels get greased and that there are other things killing bees which we can address by management.

    B. Sell your honey, don't cut down other peoples honey. Unless it is adulterated, such as some Chinese sourced honey. But, it is better marketing to sell yours and not to discount others. It won't pay for you to do that.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

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