Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 41
  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Livermore, CA
    Posts
    1,486

    Default Re: Upper/ top entrance design -- Korschgen

    Quote Originally Posted by davo View Post
    Ok, I got around to taking pictures. I hope this works.

    Attachment 4628Attachment 4629Attachment 4630
    Those are nice Davo!
    Coyote Creek Bees

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Jefferson County, WA, USA
    Posts
    132

    Default Re: Upper/ top entrance design -- Korschgen

    Picture is worth a thousand words. That's what I was thinking of. Although I was thinkning of a cover that would extend a couple extra inches in the front for more protection from rain.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Frederick, MD, USA
    Posts
    13

    Default Re: Upper/ top entrance design -- Korschgen

    If you wanted to make an awning, you could attach the cut-out to the top lip of the cover instead of onto the top super. The unevenness of the aluminum might require caulking. I would probably drill two small pilot holes through the front of the notched out cover, apply silicone or construction adhesive, then put two wood screws in from the inside of the lid. That's basically what I did with the landing pad using wood glue.

    Or, use a longer strip of 1'' board across the whole front of the lid.

    When I made them, I wanted to be able to flip the inner cover over if I needed to close up the hive for transportation. I also didn't want to have to buy new equipment. Modifying the parts I had was easy and didn't cost extra.
    Last edited by davo; 03-12-2013 at 08:03 AM.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Litchfield, CT, USA
    Posts
    430

    Default Re: Upper/ top entrance design -- Korschgen

    Maybe I missed it but are there any issues with bees building burr or bridge comb from the top bars to the cover? If not I am going to try a couple this year.
    "Someday we will look back and realize someone was right...and conveniently forget we were the ones that were wrong."

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,119

    Default Re: Upper/ top entrance design -- Korschgen

    Bridge comb will be a function of the characteristics of the bees, of the amount of space available, and of the amount of nectar coming in.

    In my case, when I keep the hive large enough (supers added or left to assure bees don't run out of space) no problems. If a hive is not supered at the correct time you will certainly get comb built up in that space. Fortunately since there is a limited space, it's not that big of a deal to clean up. I haven't had it happen in a few years.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Frederick, MD, USA
    Posts
    13

    Default Re: Upper/ top entrance design -- Korschgen

    Bridge comb was my biggest question about this whole thing. I was considering filling in part or all of the extra space created by the inner cover and shims with plywood.

    This is my first attempt at modifying covers.

    edit: S. Parker, I just now started reading your equipment link. It's extremely informative and good food for thought.
    (http://parkerfarms.biz/equipment.htm...ized_Equipment)
    Last edited by davo; 03-12-2013 at 10:37 AM.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Paducah, KY, USA
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Upper/ top entrance design -- Korschgen

    I like this design you have here. It looks like it could be reversible too so it could act like a reducer right?

  8. #28
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Paducah, KY, USA
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Upper/ top entrance design -- Korschgen

    Quote Originally Posted by Solomon Parker View Post
    That's almost exactly the 'Parker Shim' I came up with 9 years ago. The main difference is mine has no back support.

    http://parkerfarms.biz/equipment.htm...ized_Equipment

    How have you liked it? I started using mine upside down to form an 'awning' rather than a landing board. Works great for snow and gives a good place for bearding. http://parkerfarms.biz/equipment.html#The_Parker_Shim
    I noticed that your lid looks like strips on 1x4 that has two cleats nailed to it for warp prevention. What about rain/snow? does in not get in the hive with this design?

  9. #29
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    1,367

    Default Re: Upper/ top entrance design -- Korschgen

    I haven't tried it, but would turning the inner cover upside down make a top entrance.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Manning, SC
    Posts
    3,675

    Default Re: Upper/ top entrance design -- Korschgen

    http://OxaVap.com Your source for the Varrox Mite Killing
    OA Vaporizer "One of the highest ranked" by R. Oliver

  11. #31
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Vauxhall, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    76

    Default Re: Upper/ top entrance design -- Korschgen

    Quote Originally Posted by carlinmo View Post
    Frequently there is discussion about upper/top hive entrances and their benefits on this forum (and now detailed in Michael Bush’s book on page 329). Last summer I converted my nine hives to upper entrances and finally had a decent honey harvest from my older hives.

    I built upper entrances with a landing board that can quickly be placed between the hive bodies and the supers -- I do not use queen excluders. During the process of coming up with a design I looked at several of Joe Clemens designs (boy do I appreciate his CAD expertise!), the Imirie shim, and in the bee supply catalogs for options. My design is different than most that I have seen. It is constructed from 5 pieces of wood per the attached graphic. I make the opening about 20” in length, slightly longer than the standard 19 7/8” hive box, so that it fits easily on the hive box and there is a crack for a rain gutter on the front edge. As long as the two long shims are cut from good wood the frame is very sturdy.

    Contact me if you have questions or need additional information.

    Carl Korschgen
    carlkorsch@a0l.com
    573-819-8516

    Hello Carl,

    Thanks for your detailed plan on the top entrance frame. I build one yesterday and installed it today.

    Top Entrance-2.JPG

    Top Entrance-3.JPG

    How soon did you see the bees use the top entrance after installation?

    Did you reduce the bottom entrance right away?

    I would appreciate any comments.

    One note for future 'builders' make sure you don't make the distance between front entrance board and back board to tight or it may not fit all supers because of this lack of tolerance and the rain can't run off.

    Cheers, Joerg

    bee happy (now I am!)
    Summ Summ Bienchen summ herum

  12. #32
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Paducah, KY, USA
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Upper/ top entrance design -- Korschgen

    Do you ever have any problems with it breaking from getting glued down with propolis?

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Columbia, Missouri
    Posts
    47

    Default Re: Upper/ top entrance design -- Korschgen

    To answer the questions:
    I never completely close the bottom entrance. I believe they need some lower access to be able to clean the hive out from the bottom. I reduce the bottom entrance with a reducer to about 2 inches. In most of my hives 99% of the bees use the middle entrance..

    I place the middle entrance between the 2 hive bodies and the supers. The bees will definitely propylize the entrance to the hive bodies. I can usually crack off of the supers without damaging the entrance frame. However it is still a thin shim and will not last forever. I know that I have had some hives for at least four years .

    You should expect to get some burr comb (usually drone comb) between the supers and hive bodies when you use this entrance. I believe this is beneficial in that it acts as a queen gap. Last year I pulled 130 frames from my supers and had brood in only four or five. Last year I averaged 70 pounds per hive -- a great year.

    Carl Korschgen

  14. #34
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Vauxhall, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    76

    Default Re: Upper/ top entrance design -- Korschgen

    Thanks Carl, much appreciated. I installed it between honey super 2 & 3 and have two deep brood.

    It seems the bees just suntan and dance on top and do a lot of propylizing. Maybe they just need a little time.

    @jgrizle - one mistake I made was build the frame to tight, the next one will be a little more 'sloppy' and one has to be careful, but once installed it can stay until removal of the honey supers, so I don't see to big of a problem. Once one is made, it only takes 10 minutes to make a bunch from left over wood.

    Maybe it should have a handrail to avoid bee injuries it is deep!

    Cheers, Joerg
    Summ Summ Bienchen summ herum

  15. #35
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Vauxhall, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    76

    Default Re: Upper/ top entrance design -- Korschgen

    Hello,

    I will try to add a short video clip showing what my bees do (or not do) I have only a few seen flying away and landing on the upper entrance.



    Should the entrance opening be higher? If compared to the bottom, it is only 1/2 the height.

    Joerg
    Summ Summ Bienchen summ herum

  16. #36
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Champaign, Illinois
    Posts
    376

    Default Re: Upper/ top entrance design -- Korschgen

    The guy who taught me was big into boring holes in all his honey supers and top boxes in deeps.
    It taught me to look where I put my paws before I grab. It relates to this topic in that his theory was to save workers a lot of travel-time. Training the field bees to use them holes...he never taught me about that but simply muttered something about that they'll propolize them up if they don't want to use them.
    Internet credibility is an oxymoron

  17. #37
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Vauxhall, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    76

    Default Re: Upper/ top entrance design -- Korschgen

    Could it be that the bees on the top are only young worker bees and can't/don't want to fly, yet?

    Maybe it is just to late in the season to teach my bees new tricks?

    Joerg
    Summ Summ Bienchen summ herum

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
    Posts
    83

    Default Re: Upper/ top entrance design -- Korschgen

    I built a couple of these and installed them a few weeks ago on my two strongest hives. My bees totally ignored them, other than having guard bees inside watching the entrance. I removed them and all is good. I place my inner cover notch down and my bees love that as an upper entrance.
    Brad - First year - 9 hives - plan to go commercial - much to learn
    https://www.facebook.com/FaithApiaries

  19. #39
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Vauxhall, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    76

    Default Re: Upper/ top entrance design -- Korschgen

    Hello again,

    One more photo and the question again:

    Could it be that the bees on the top are only young worker bees and can't/don't want to fly, yet?

    Maybe it is just to late in the season to teach my bees new tricks?
    Very few fly of the entrance or land at it.

    Hive-1.jpg

    Cheers, Joerg
    Summ Summ Bienchen summ herum

  20. #40
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Castle Rock, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    585

    Default Re: Upper/ top entrance design -- Korschgen

    Great ideas & approaches.

    I've found that slipping a super back 3/4", and laying an entrance reducer across the gap created in the front is the simplest, easiest & least "resource & effort" demanding approach. I suppose you could call it the "super-slide".

    The design of standard supers is such that there is no opening in the back when one is slid back 3/4" over the one below - the inside top box simply overhangs the bottom outside in the back, with perhaps a hairline crack that the bees soon propolize shut.IMG_61961.jpg

    The 3/4" gap across the front is the same width as a standard entrance reducer. If one didn't mind a small handful of "specialty pieces", one could make "entrance reducers" that are 1-1/2" longer (the outside width of whatever size box you are using). The bees also quickly propolize the reducer into place, and there is usually enough existing propolis to hold it there to begin with. Obviously, you can vary the entrance size with the ease of changing the reducer.

    IMG_51051.jpgIMG_50861.jpg

    As usual, there are often many solutions to a given "problem". This has been my "simplest solution" for decades, and it wasn't my idea. The bees do often take a week or three to become accustomed to it. However if you are uniting a divide , above a double screen over a parent colony - problem also solved.

    If you are looking for a top entrance for the winter, well, there are plenty of options there, as well.
    After 35 years, I've come to realize that the bees can fix most of my mistakes.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads