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Thread: Paw paw mead

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Triadelphia, West Virginia
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    331

    Default Paw paw mead

    We bottled our first mead yesterday. Got 24 bottles with a little extra (ran out of bottles). We started it last August. Turned out pretty good, to me at least. I don't really drink and probably couldn't tell the difference between a fine wine and Mad Dog. Anyway, going to make another batch but this time I want to make a melomel with paw paws. I love them. Has anyone ever used paw paw? Any advice?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    285

    Default Re: Paw paw mead

    I haven't seen a paw paw tree since I was a kid (and that was a long time ago). I bet most people now-days never heard of them.
    Be the reason someone smiles today....Or the reason they drink....Whatever works best.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    180

    Default Re: Paw paw mead

    I have a Paw-Paw tree at home that is bearing a lot of fruit this year. What is this melomel you speak of?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Triadelphia, West Virginia
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    331

    Default Re: Paw paw mead

    Beegora: They dont know what they're missing! They grow everywhere around here. We harvest alot of edibles from the woods. Have you ever heard of anyone using them in mead or wine? I would love to try it, just looking for a little guidance.

    Pooh Bear: I've never made it but want to. I'm looking for a recipe or info from someone who has used them in mead before. If find a recipe off site I will post it for you.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Knox, Pa. USA
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    3,516

    Default Re: Paw paw mead

    This is a general recipe I use, It is for a 1 gallon batch.. the K-met for up to 5 gallons would be increased to 1/4 tsp. not 1/8 tsp. per gallon. I also add K-met at each racking after the first as the sulfites are what preserve the mead or wine. Also if you back sweeten, you will want to add potassium sorbate.

    Pawpaw wine recipe
    ⦁ 2-3 lbs ripe pawpaws
    ⦁ 2 lbs granulated sugar or 1 1/2 pounds honey
    ⦁ 7 pts water
    ⦁ 1 tsp acid blend
    ⦁ 1 tsp pectic enzyme
    ⦁ 1/2 tsp grape tannin
    ⦁ 1/8 tsp Potassium Metablisulphite (K-met)
    ⦁ 1 tsp yeast nutrient
    ⦁ wine yeast
    ⦁ Peel the fruit and cut into pieces. Put fruit in nylon straining bag, tie closed, and place bag in primary. Mash fruit in bag, disolve honey or sugar in warm water. Pour water over fruit. When room temperature, add all ingredients except yeast. Recover and set aside 24 hours. Add yeast. When the must is fermenting vigorously, stir twice daily gently squeezing bag for 7 days. Drain bag and squeeze gently to extract most juice and flavor, then transfer juice to secondary. Fit airlock and set aside for 1 month. Rack into sterilized secondary, add another 1/8 tsp K-met Or 1 finely campden tablet. Top up and refit airlock. Rack again after 3 months, top up and refit airlock. Check wine for clarity after additional 3 months. If wine has not cleared, fine with gelatin, wait two weeks, and rack into bottles. Age additional 6-12 months.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    1,682

    Default Re: Paw paw mead

    I have tried to plant paw-paw trees on several occasions. The only that lived became deer food.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Triadelphia, West Virginia
    Posts
    331

    Default Re: Paw paw mead

    Ten Bears, thank you so much. I was hoping to hear from you on this one. Thanks for the recipe. I will try it as soon as the paw paws are ripe.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Knox Co, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    1,054

    Default Re: Paw paw mead

    The biggest barrier to starting Paw paw trees from seed is letting the seed dry out. Seed should be planted right away.

    Tom

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Triadelphia, West Virginia
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    Default Re: Paw paw mead


    Got my paw paws today.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Triadelphia, West Virginia
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    Default Re: Paw paw mead


    Here's one cut open with seeds beside it for anyone who might not have seen one before.

    Found a couple of dinky two prongers while we were getting the paw paws, maybe in ten more years.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Rulison, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    121

    Default Re: Paw paw mead

    I hate to be the first to ask, but what is a "paw paw", and what does it taste like?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    180

    Default Re: Paw paw mead

    I was eating a paw-paw when I saw the update on this thread. Great fruit, tastes delicious. I can see why it's not commercially available as it does bruise incredibly easy.

    Anyway. I think this weekend I will make the paw paw mead

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Cumberland Va.
    Posts
    4,652

    Default Re: Paw paw mead

    I think they taste similar to a banana. only different, Ive, never collected them, just ate a few as i walked through the woods. we have creek bottoms loaded with them. Doesn't seem to have a heavy bounty yearly, but maybe I have just missed it. I will have to make it a point to walk the creek this weekend. G
    The Bees are the Beekeepers

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Manassas, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    2,128

    Default Re: Paw paw mead

    I was about to say it and Graham beat me to it. Kinda like bananas.

    My wife used to work in DC, and discovered pawpaws in a Smithsonian garden. They just let the fruit drop on the sidewalk, so she collected it. We ate some straight but she also used them in bread, using a banana bread recipe.

    The fruit is very soft and can be eaten more or less like a pudding.

    She saved the seeds and we're trying to grow them at our place in WV. Slow going so far. The seeds can be frozen and then planted, but she found that they may not germinate for a year after planting. She'd given up on several pots in which she had planted them, so planted something else. The following year, there were the pawpaw seedlings.

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