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Thread: Wrong answer

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default Wrong answer

    Well I was putting together boxes today. The GF was watching and we were having a good time talking and getting work done when she asks me... How far in do those staples go?

    So I reply, "Well they are 2 inches long so they go in about" pulls trigger "1/4 of an inch into my finger I would guess."

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Default Re: Wrong answer

    There is no good place to put a staple in your body... but the worst I had was roofing and the other guy had is trigger wired back and the gun slid down the roof and hit my knee and went off. I remember thiking, "it's a good thing that didn't go in my knee" and then I tried to pull it out and found it it did...

    Another typical method of getting your finger is to have your hand holding the corner and the staple, instead of going straight, hits a knot and comes right out the side into your finger...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Wrong answer

    Never try to clear a jam without first disconnecting air hose! Don't ask...
    Politics is the entertainment branch of industry. -Frank Zappa

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Barry, TX USA
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    Default Re: Wrong answer

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    comes right out the side into your finger...
    That happened to me the other day putting together frames with an 18 guage brad gun. Funny, didn't hurt till I looked at it.
    When you stop learning you're dead.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Fort Worth, TX, USA
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    1,774

    Default Re: Wrong answer

    I was considering purchasing
    Something of this type.
    I like my hammer. TV and frame
    Building. Slow, safe.
    Time to be a gypsy again, 2014 will be my prep year, my bees want a better area with actual rainfall.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    Cupertino, CA, USA
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    Default Re: Wrong answer

    I make my own boxes and frames and still can't figure out why anyone uses nails in either boxes or frames. I use 1" pine, snug tolerances, and Titebond III only and haven't had a problem for two years. When will I discover that I should have used nails?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Wrong answer

    >Slow, safe.

    Yes, but you can use a gun safely, just keep your hands far enough away that it can't reach...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    St. Albans, Vermont
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    Default Re: Wrong answer

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    I remember thiking, "it's a good thing that didn't go in my knee" and then I tried to pull it out and found it it did...
    They go in a lot easier than they come out, eh Mike?

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Clark county, Illinois, USA
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    Default Re: Wrong answer

    Yep a staple gun is about as safe of a tool as you could ever have. I can't think of any way to get hurt with one that does not involve gross operator error. As was the case with me.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
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    Rock Hill, SC
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    Default Re: Wrong answer

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    ...Another typical method of getting your finger is to have your hand holding the corner and the staple, instead of going straight, hits a knot and comes right out the side into your finger...
    I've had this happen with 18 ga. brads. Had one go in the ring finger and exit through the fingernail. Have a drill bit story and my left thumb that was pretty gross and very painful.
    Experience isn't always the best way to learn...You usually get the lesson first...And the instruction afterwards...

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Default Re: Wrong answer

    >They go in a lot easier than they come out, eh Mike?

    Yep. Much quicker... and hurts less...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  12. #12
    Join Date
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    VENTURA, California, USA
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    Default Re: Wrong answer

    You know, there is an adjustment on the device that allows you to select single or multiple nails.
    But, as stated, some people do wire up the safety on those guns.
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  13. #13
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Wrong answer

    Nail gun "accident"
    3 nails
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/roentgenator/1001254360/

    6 nails
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/3685791.stm

    Nail-Gun injuries to the hand.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2586285/
    Most accidents involving nail guns result from operator inexperience, lack of knowledge, inattention to safety precautions, or poor mechanical safety mechanisms of the nail guns.17,22,44 Injuries occur from various circumstances, including nail ricochet, gun double firing, accidental discharges, and penetration of the receiving structure.3,17,22,38,44 Nail guns should be used only by knowledgeable, educated, and experienced personnel, with proper protective clothing, and precautionary measures should be clearly displayed at all times.36 Unfortunately, the incidence of industrial hand injuries remains high despite advances in health and safety awareness. Some studies have questioned the adequacy of on-the-job training and suggested more extensive operator training and improvement in protective clothing.13,45

    Revision nail-gun safety mechanisms and use of newer sequential triggers may prevent accidental misfires. The older and more commonly used contact trip trigger nail guns allow nails to discharge from the tool anytime the nose and trigger mechanism are both depressed.13,17,22,44 Accordingly, the operator may keep the trigger depressed during rapid fire “bounce” nailing and may accidentally contact the steadying hand or other body part in lieu of the structure itself. Sequential trigger nail guns, on the other hand, require the nose of the nail gun to be depressed first—before the trigger is pressed—to fire a nail, which makes it more difficult to unintentionally discharge nails. Lipscomb et al studied 772 apprentice carpenters, carpenters with four or less years of experience, finding that approximately half of these carpenters would sustain a nail-gun injury before they completed their 4-year apprenticeship training.44 It was also not uncommon for them to be injured more than once by a nail gun during this period. Exposure to tools with contact trip trigger mechanisms carried twice the risk of injury than did tools with sequential triggers after adjusting for training and experience.44,45 Of the injuries noted, more than 40% of the contact trip injuries occurred when the carpenter was “bounce” or “bump” nailing. Although contact trigger use may not be the sole contributing factor, an increased likelihood of injury due to reduced control of accuracy is inevitable.
    Lets be careful!
    Last edited by BEES4U; 02-24-2012 at 08:33 PM.
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

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