Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Clinton, N.C, USA
    Posts
    11

    Default Fruit Trees zone 8b?

    Im planning on planting some fruit trees on my farm this spring mainly for my bees. This will be my first bee season and was wondering if there was one type of fruit tree over another. I live in zone 8b and was really considering some type of peach trees. Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Madison County, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: Fruit Trees zone 8b?

    Ouch!... I live in zone 7b and just planted Apple and Peach, 2 each, in my front yard. From all the information I've read you'd have to have a substantial orchard to benefit the bees as a nectar/pollen source. It would be a couple years before your trees started to supply a source for your bees. Maybe get what you like and use the bees to increase it's yield while they get a tasty treat in the process.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Clackamas Oregon
    Posts
    725

    Default Re: Fruit Trees zone 8b?

    I just added a Frost peach and tore out a New Haven, too much leaf curl.
    It may not help but if I have 10 trees and so do my neighbors, pretty soon it adds up.
    “Why do we fall, sir? So that we might learn to pick ourselves up” Alfred Pennyworth Batman Begins (2005)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    372

    Default Re: Fruit Trees zone 8b?

    Cherries are great for bees also. Of course any citrus also. Lemon, lime, orange, the honey can slightly taste like it. Any tree though will make flowers and the bees will go after it. But like Supertad said, even ten trees won't be enough for the bees, so just get what you like. The bees will forage for themselves within a few miles of the hive. Bee bushes that have really good flowers are a lot better then fruit trees for the bees to collect from. Each flower has its own taste so you might want to go out and taste the different honeys and see what you like.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Fruit Trees zone 8b?

    When I plant my orchard I'm going to make sure there is lots of borage planted in there as well to encourage the bees to come near my trees and pollenate them.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Limestone Co, Alabama
    Posts
    1,674

    Default Re: Fruit Trees zone 8b?

    Worker bees are female and loyal to the blossom. So unlike us men, worker bees don't chase after every pretty flower they see. Therefore, a few fruit trees will not make very much if any honey. It is almost a lead pipe cinch that when your trees bloom there will be a competing nectar or pollen source nearby that will hold your bees undivided attention, maybe even to the total exclusion of your trees. For this reason many orchard owners mow or burn down the ground cover with Round Up just before the bloom. There are then fewer wild flowers competing with his fruit trees for the bees attention. If it were not for native pollinators a lot of home sited fruit trees would bee old maids. However when it comes to hundreds or thousands of one tree, all of them in the same location, and everyone blooming at once, a bonanza can bee realized buy using honey bees to assure that every blossom on every tree is pollinated. But this bonanza is usually the fruit growers' bonanza and not the beekeepers'. I think migratory beekeepers will tell you that their hives are often lighter coming out of orchards than they were going in unless there is also a good flow from wild flowers or another agricultural crop. Myself I love the feel of the Sun on my face as I watch the little bee working an apple or peach blossom on a spring day, so plant what ever trees YOU like best or that are best suited to your zone and soil type.

    One word of caution. All fruit wood is rather weak or brittle. It is quite possible that your bees will provide you with too much of a good thing. Some years it may become necessary to thin or cull most of the little green apples and especially peaches to prevent them from breaking the limbs off your trees as the fruit gets bigger. This will also improve quality and fruit size. In extreme cases it may bee necessary inorder for the trees to be able to produce the next years’ crop.
    Scrapfe---Never believe anything in politics until it has been officially denied.--Otto von Bismarck.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads