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Thread: swarm trapping

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX, USA
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    1,789

    Default Re: swarm trapping

    I'll echo that drain hole in the bottom question. And should I
    Paint the inside of the plywood bottom? I normally paint my
    Solid bottom boards. I have already built a couple of standard
    Bottoms and telescoping covers for my nuc traps.
    Save them for actual nucs?
    I'm thinking wood shims for guides in my foundationless frames.
    A 10 pack is about a dollar.
    Stuck in Texas. Learning Permaculture in drought, guess I will teach permaculture in drought. The bees are still alive.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Barry, TX USA
    Posts
    861

    Default Re: swarm trapping

    If you live in a very humid climate a weep hole in the bottom of a box might be prudent. I don't see a need to add a vent of any sort since the bees will move into permanent gear later on. I don't see a need to paint the interior but I guess you could. The bees will poilsh it up and seal holes with propolis. I just use plywood tops and bottoms on swarm traps. I would save nice bottom boards and tops for regular hives. Go to the paint counter of your closest big box and see how many paint stirrers you can talk them out of. They'll make great guides in your foundationless frames. Beats a dollar. Easy to make with a tablesaw if you have one using free scrap lumber.
    When you stop learning you're dead.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX, USA
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    1,789

    Default Re: swarm trapping

    Thank you. I figured paint smell on the inside would put the bees "off" - didn't paint the bottom board of my Hogan Trap either, for the same reason. Got surplus plywood from the base on the trap tower - 19/32 should do decent extra nucs. And have tomorrow "off" as it is supposed to rain, then it's cold all weekend. I'll say I'm going to get something done on a day, then the phone rings and it's a customer, or the sun sets and I turn into a pumpkin. I just do what I can when I can...

    I'm going to drill a weep hole in the bottom, and staple screening over it, inside and out, regular window screening.

    Gypsi
    Stuck in Texas. Learning Permaculture in drought, guess I will teach permaculture in drought. The bees are still alive.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Barry, TX USA
    Posts
    861

    Default Re: swarm trapping

    I am racing to Rusk and Grapeland today to get some work done there, trying to beat the rain. Tomorrow evening I start my weekend marathon of swarm trap prep. I really don't think the weep hole is necessary in Ft. Worth. Houston might be another story.
    When you stop learning you're dead.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX, USA
    Posts
    1,789

    Default Re: swarm trapping

    Are you just screwing the plywood lid on, (thinking about all the ticked off bees when I go to take mine off :-)
    Stuck in Texas. Learning Permaculture in drought, guess I will teach permaculture in drought. The bees are still alive.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Clark county, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    220

    Default Re: swarm trapping

    Less ticked off bees undoing a few screws than prying out nails or staples.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    Posts
    192

    Default Re: swarm trapping

    I'm thinking about using velcro glued and screwed onto the hive on the side and top. Light, fast, and easy.

    Ted

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX, USA
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    1,789

    Default Re: swarm trapping

    Quote Originally Posted by taydeko View Post
    I'm thinking about using velcro glued and screwed onto the hive on the side and top. Light, fast, and easy.

    Ted
    Checking my sewing machine drawer for velcro
    Stuck in Texas. Learning Permaculture in drought, guess I will teach permaculture in drought. The bees are still alive.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX, USA
    Posts
    1,789

    Default Re: swarm trapping

    Kids can open velcro. Going back to screws. I have grandchildren near one of these bait hives.
    Stuck in Texas. Learning Permaculture in drought, guess I will teach permaculture in drought. The bees are still alive.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,937

    Default Re: swarm trapping

    I use "Gorilla" , duct tape, to hold lids on nucs, and to secure the inner cover when I sell hives/nucs, when people come to pick them up. ( I put a piece of screen over the hole in the inner cover and Gorilla tape the inner cover to the hive chamber) Gorilla duct tape is virtually waterproof, will stick to almost anything. I use it a lot.

    I sometimes screw the lids on swarm traps, but, I normally transfer from the trap to a new hive, BEFORE I move the swarm I have caught. That way the queen and the new swarm is already familiar with the new hive, and it is the same procedure as moving any hive. Also, after transferring into a new hive, you don't have to worry about holes, ill fitting tops or bottoms. I often move them in the rear of a Chevy Tahoe with screen over the entrance. cchoganjr

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Barry, TX USA
    Posts
    861

    Default Re: swarm trapping

    I use deck screws. I have them around all the time. My cordless drill has become standard beekeeping equipment for me. I use it with strips of wood to secure hive bodies, tops and bottoms together before moving a hive. One strip of wood on each side and the back of a hive keeps it very secure and screws are much quieter than hive staples. I use the drill to secure entrance screens, entrance reducers, robber screens and swarm trap lids. Don't have to worry about them blowing off that way. True, I do need the drill to loosen the cover but since I have it handy all of the time, it's not a problem and doesn't seem to bother the bees much. Since I've started this program I don't have any problem with screens, lids or reducers coming loose or falling off. The screws are reusable if I don't strip them out. It does leave an assortment of holes in equipment that will eventually get covered up with paint. The screw holes have not posed a great problem for me yet.

    I have been known to resort to that all around, can fix any problem, 8th wonder of the world, duct tape in a pinch when it's more of a temporary thing. Always seem to have duct tape around also. Guess that earns me my man badge...
    When you stop learning you're dead.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX, USA
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    1,789

    Default Re: swarm trapping

    Duct tape definitely failed on me last year, but then I never did get my man card...
    Stuck in Texas. Learning Permaculture in drought, guess I will teach permaculture in drought. The bees are still alive.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Barry, TX USA
    Posts
    861

    Default Re: swarm trapping

    Duct tape is very temporary...Sometimes gives up before you intend for it to.
    When you stop learning you're dead.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,937

    Default Re: swarm trapping

    beyondthesidewalks......gypsi...... Have you tried the Gorilla Tape. I was really surprized how durable it is. Pricey to be sure, but very durable and really holds. cchoganjr

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Barry, TX USA
    Posts
    861

    Default Re: swarm trapping

    I've seen it but it struck as the Gorilla brand of duct tape. Haven't tried it but I'll take a look.
    When you stop learning you're dead.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Liberty, Indiana, USA
    Posts
    167

    Default Re: swarm trapping

    L.M. Reese: I use old deeps that have bad corners or some other defect. Cut a 1 inch hole in there front of the box. I then take a 2 x 2's that are 9-5/8" long and screw one in each corner. Make a 3/8 plywood lid and bottom. Screw the lid into the 2 x 2's. Cut a 1 x 4 about 16 inches long and screw it to one side of the deep so that it extends up 6 3/8 inches above the deep. In the end that extends up past the box come down from the top about 2 inches and put a 1/2" hole so a nail can easily fit through. Place 7 frames inside that are empty and 1 drawn out comb that is old and dark. It will be less appetizing to wax moths that way. Place a small snack size baggie inside the box somewhere under or behind the frames with a piece of paper towel in there that you have placed about 5-8 drops of lemon grass oil.
    Put that in a place close to a river drainage and check it about once a week. I am going to be building some more soon and putting the process on my blog. I have caught a lot with that setup.

    http://letmbee.com
    Youtube channel - http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=letmbee
    Last edited by LetMBee; 02-09-2012 at 04:34 PM. Reason: update

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Ringgold, GA. USA
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: swarm trapping

    I got some of the Kelley plastic disc entrances in the mail today. I was kind of disappointed in them. They seem to small to be much use. The entrance hole is only big enough for one or two bees to pass through at a time. Do ya'll think that would be big enough to use on a trap ?

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Barry, TX USA
    Posts
    861

    Default Re: swarm trapping

    When I first looked at the WTK discs I noticed that they had plastic and metal disks. Looking at the dimensions of the plastic disk, they seemed small to me. The durability of galvanized metal disks struck my fancy along with what seemed to be the correct size. That's what I use now. I initially got larger plastic disks from Betterbee. Eventually I couldn't get them because they were having problems sourcing them from the manufacturer in Greece(if I'm not mistaken). I resorted to making my own swarm trap closures until I happened upon the WTK metal disks. Betterbee has the large plastic disks again and I would buy them if the metal disks from WTK were no longer available. The plastic doesn't last IMO and experience. The sun dries them out and makes them brittle. They get banged around in transport and eventually break. The durability of the WTK metal disks makes them my hands down favorite. An opinion worth what you paid for it...
    When you stop learning you're dead.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Barry, TX USA
    Posts
    861

    Default Re: swarm trapping

    "Pricey to be sure"

    You're right about that Cleo. I priced the Gorilla tape on my way home from work this evening and it was three times the price of duct tape. Screws seem to be the most economic and sure to hold alternative even if they require the cordless drill and extra work.
    When you stop learning you're dead.

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX, USA
    Posts
    1,789

    Default Re: swarm trapping

    Robber bees remove duct tape. Don't know if the gorilla
    Would make a difference. I'm going with screws and
    Pipe strap for robber screens.
    Not sure how mucH I'll trust duct tape.
    Gypsi
    Stuck in Texas. Learning Permaculture in drought, guess I will teach permaculture in drought. The bees are still alive.

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