Results 1 to 8 of 8

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Niskayuna, NY, USA
    Posts
    97

    Default Mead in Small Batches

    When you make small batches of mead, should you still use the whole package of yeast? It seems that a yeast package is good for a 6 gallon batch. I used a whole packet for a one gallon batch (per the directions I got).

    Will the alcohol just kill all the yeast when it gets to the level the yeast can tolerate? Will there be a yeast taste?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Port Richey Fl USA
    Posts
    238

    Default Re: Mead in Small Batches

    Once you open a package of yeast they will likely deteriorate, if not sealed and refrigerated properly. You can make much more then 6 gallon batch out of 1 yeast package if you properly hydrate them, then let them grow and multiply for few days in separate container, (flask, bottle). I never had any yeast taste in my wines when using wine yeast, make sure you start with S.G 1095, and if you want high alcohol content you "feed" the yeast adding some sugar when S.G. drops. If you want dry wine/mead don't do that. I had Lalvin EC 1116 and 1118 yeast ferment my wines to 20% alcohol.

    Obviously that was more a liquor than a wine.

    LOL

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Niskayuna, NY, USA
    Posts
    97

    Default Re: Mead in Small Batches

    In my (2) one gallon batches, those are the 2 strains I used. They were rcommended by the brew shop for a dry mead. I hope they stop before 20%.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Port Richey Fl USA
    Posts
    238

    Default Re: Mead in Small Batches

    Alcohol content is directly proportional to suger content assuming yeast are nurished and working properly.

    It is essential to use hydrometer to measure suger content before fermentation starts.

    Without using hydrometer it is just guessing game, to me it is waste of time money and effort if you want to have expected outcome.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Niskayuna, NY, USA
    Posts
    97

    Default Re: Mead in Small Batches

    I started at 1.110.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Port Richey Fl USA
    Posts
    238

    Default Re: Mead in Small Batches

    If you started at 1.110, you'll get about 14% alcohol which is perfect for mead assuming the yeast will ferment all available sugar.

    So it you want dry mead you want to make sure there is no residual sugar left.

    Keep your eye on fermentation process and when S.G is between 1010 / 1005 and you see fermentation slows down add a tablespoon or more of super ferment to energise and rejuvanate the yeast, making sure it will ferment all the sugar, or you end up with semi dry mead.

    Your mead will taste dry if S.G. goes down below 1000 at least to .995.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Quincy, Mass USA
    Posts
    225

    Default Re: Mead in Small Batches

    Quote Originally Posted by No-sage View Post
    I started at 1.110.
    My typical target as well.... Most of the yeasts I favor are in the 14% range so it goes dry.... If I want a sweet or semi sweet mead I stabilize and backsweeten to taste....

    On topic I usually do multiple 1 gallon batches when I am trying new recipes.... No problem with splitting since I use a yeast starter which typically hydrates to about 1.5L so there is plenty of hungry yeast to spread around.... Like the earlier post have no problem with off flavors as long as the yeast is properly fed and managed....

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Columbia, MD/Belchertown, MA
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Mead in Small Batches

    I make one gallon batches all the time. If I'm starting 2-4 gallons, I'll split 1 or 2 yeast packets among them. If I'm starting just one, I throw the whole packet in. I haven't had any problems with that so far. Once the yeast ferments out the available sugar or builds up an alcohol level they can't tolerate, they go dormant and sediment out. The only yeast flavors I've ever noticed came from sampling things that weren't fully cleared. If you bottle something that isn't fully clear, it will continue to clear with time, just be careful when you open and decant it to keep the sediment from re-suspending.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads