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Thread: Maqs

  1. #41
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    Jan 2008
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    Faulkner Manitoba, Canada
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    Default Re: Maqs

    Formic has a tendancy to be a disinfectant in the hive when used and it also controls trachea mites. This would be an advantage over synthetic mite treatments

  2. #42
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    Jan 2008
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    Faulkner Manitoba, Canada
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    Default Re: Maqs

    For me, I am not sure i would use MAQS just yet. The cost is kind of high for them.
    I like the flash treatment with the meat pads, and it was cheap enough. That said, the costs kicked in with 3-5 treatments done 4-7 days apart. Alot of trips in and out of the hives. The first treatment with the meat pads, the bees cleaned out maybe 25% of their pads. It was a bit cooler that week. However, the next two treatments at least 75-80% cleaned those little meat pads out on their own. The rest were propolized in. Queen damage, hard to tell. The treatments were done in the fall. However i will say this, all hives were young...spring 2011 queens. Treatments was 35-40ml per pad placed on the top of the double deep.
    The 2010 flash treatments saw some queen loss. I will admit, I did not use the meat pads but rather the blue shop towels and they had double the dose as the 2011 fall flash treatments and they were shoved in on the bottom board with 65-70 ml dose. As luck would have it, day 5 or 6 post treatment, I had one of the provincial apiarists out testing hives for a residue study i signed up for. We specifically went into the hives which were flashed. He taught me that the since the cells were already or close to being capped at day 5 or 6 on the hives which lost the queens, the flash only sped up the inevitable. Older queens or weak can not handle these flash treatments. This might be a good thing.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
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    Default Re: Maqs

    >>Also the thing i notice with non-synthetic miteicides (formic, thymol) is they are beneficial for more that just mites.
    >>What benifit do the non- synthetic treatments have other than mite control?


    Formic will help with t mites, thats a proven fact but dont start generalizing too much further
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  4. #44

    Default Re: Maqs

    Quote Originally Posted by wildbranch2007 View Post
    I didn't use and gave the product to a friend that was short
    You have something against tall people?
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    syracuse n.y.
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    Default Re: Maqs

    Quote Originally Posted by beemandan View Post
    You have something against tall people?
    funny, I never usually read what I write, but in this case if you knew the person I gave it to, you would laugh at the statement also. thnaks for the winter laugh
    mike syracuse ny
    I went to bed mean, and woke up meaner. Marshal Dillon

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Panola County, TX USA
    Posts
    117

    Default Re: Maqs

    these pads make you work a little harder, if you can handle that than use them and your bees will be good. visit your hives often

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
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    Default Re: Maqs

    Talked to a sales rep from NOD at our convention. Also sat in on a presentation on the use of MAQS with some hives over the last 2 years.

    They run it along side of the MiteAwayII application.

    They are talking 90-95% efficacy
    they are also talking OPENLY about brood losses, queen losses, lots of bee losses. They were talking 1500- 2500 dead bees collected on the 1st few days of the treatment
    to me there was not alot different inthe trial between the MiteAwayII and the MAQS EXCEPT they did prove the MAQS killed almost all the mites found under the cappings

    So, I guess if you used MiteAwayII before and liked it, this product is an up grade. Easier to use, no extra equipment, kills mites under the cappings. Might see higher bee brood and queen mortality but I think that went along with the MiteAwayII anyway

    Cheers!
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Manitoba, Canada, North of the 50th Parallel
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    217

    Default Re: Maqs

    Hi Ian,

    I was at the presentation as well. What you say sounds about right in what the researchers presented in their study.

    I am still concerned about using MAQS in the fall due to the higher queen losses. The amount of bees lost is also a concern for me; however if the bees are older bees (which I don't know), then they would be lost anyways before winter. If the bees on the other hand are young bees that are supposed to be over-wintering, then maybe this is not entirely a good thing.
    Last edited by Jonathan Hofer; 01-29-2012 at 09:46 AM. Reason: typo
    Happiness comes from within

  9. #49

    Default Re: Maqs

    I have used the the MAQS and had pretty good luck with them in august. it is really hard to get the temp down low enough for me to use it. But I am pleased with results i saw. according to weather conditions it can be all over the charts. but overall i like what i see. If you are having queen issues add Honeybee-Healthy to the pads ahead of time and this should help on queens issue. it is not fool proof but it does help.

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Manning, SC
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    2,049

    Default Re: Maqs

    Do you notice that the bees do NOT remove the MAQS as advertised or is it just me?

    Larry

  11. #51
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
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    2,479

    Default Re: Maqs

    Larry I had to remove 99% of the ones I put in, and they get propilized down and break apart.

  12. #52
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    May 2009
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    Garland, Bladen County, NC, USA
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    Default Re: Maqs

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom G. Laury View Post
    Larry I had to remove 99% of the ones I put in, and they get propilized down and break apart.
    Ditto! Ditto!
    “Don’t tell me how educated you are, tell me how much you have travelled.” - The Quran

  13. #53

    Default Re: Maqs

    I did have to remove them

  14. #54
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    syracuse n.y.
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    Default Re: Maqs

    I just found this by mistake on the government site, I only copied the first and last paragraph as I'm having trouble with copying it. they don't reference the product as maqs but since the study was done in 2011 I assume it is or a new product. Interesting that they are looking at it as a treatment for nosema. I'm also trying to find the study they reference.

    http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/pro...s=true&fy=2011





    1a.Objectives (from AD-416)
    The objectives of this cooperative research project is: a) to determine the efficacy of an innovative formulation of formic acid preparation for controlling Varroa destructor under field conditions, b) to determine its impact, if any, on colony strength, and c) to measure residues in honey.


    3.Progress Report
    This report documents research conducted under a Trust Agreement between ARS and the NOD APIARY PRODUCTS LTD. Additional details for the research can be found in the report for the parent project 6204-21000-010-00D, PESTS, PARASITES, DISEASES AND STRESS OF MANAGED HONEY BEES USED IN HONEY PRODUCTION AND POLLINATION
    The goal of this project was to test the performance of the NOD product, containing formic acid, in a hot weather environment. Formic acid is volatile and its vapor pressure is dependant on temperature. High levels of formic acid are adverse to honey bee health. A study was conducted in August 2010 in south Texas. All open brood was killed, but queen bees were not. Unfortunately, mite efficacy was low and the product was not considered efficacious. We do not anticipate further work on this product for the control of V. destructor, but we will focus on control of Nosema. A fortuitous observation during this time found that colonies with Nosema ceranae infections had significant lower levels when treated with formic acid.
    mike syracuse ny
    I went to bed mean, and woke up meaner. Marshal Dillon

  15. #55
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    syracuse n.y.
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    Default Re: Maqs

    I found parent project 6204-21000-010-00D, PESTS, PARASITES, DISEASES AND STRESS OF MANAGED HONEY BEES USED IN HONEY PRODUCTION AND POLLINATION

    but all it gave me was a headache, no reference to the formic test, but I did find this although not relevant to the thread it is interesting.

    In cooperation with Mann Lake Ltd., we tested Comite II for control of Varroa destructor. We found that Comite II significantly reduced V. destructor populations in field trial. In cooperation with Elanco, we tested Spinosad for control of Varroa destructor and Aethina tumida, the small hive beetle. We found little or no efficacy in controlling V. destructor with Spinosad, but A. tumida were controlled.



    http://www.reeis.usda.gov/web/crispr...es/407511.html

    Never heard of commit-II but will have to go look at the mann lake site
    mike syracuse ny
    I went to bed mean, and woke up meaner. Marshal Dillon

  16. #56
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Peace River, AB Canada
    Posts
    456

    Default Re: Maqs

    Does the formic treatment work in the same way as acetic acid fumigation of dead outs to control nosema?

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