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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Amelia, VA
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    34

    Default Boiled linseed oil and beeswax

    Have been building my TBHs and am ready to prep them for the outdoors. Was thinking that Boiled Linseed oil and Beeswax was a Natual Alternative to paint.
    Not so sure after perusing many many threads.
    Any thoughts on the BEST Natural , short of pricey dipping teq's?

    For those of you who have done B.L.Oil and Wax, can you recommend ratios and mixing techniques? how about application? brush or rub?
    Obstacles are there for a reason. They give us a chance to show how badly we want something.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,887

    Default Re: Boiled linseed oil and beeswax

    From an old thread:

    Beeswax paint
    Beekeepers and delamination should be an oxymoron, we all have access to the finest waterproofing around: beeswax. Buy a gallon of turpentine (the real stuff distilled from trees, not the mineral turps from coal), heat turpentine in a crockpot and add beeswax until you get 25-50% of the volume. Higher wax content is fine when applying warm from the crockpot, but not when cold. The more wax, the more waterproofing but the stiffer it is to apply cold, and it is not as effective on end grain because it is not absorbed as well.

    Turpentine is the penetrant, carrying wax into the pores of the wood/plywood/exposed surface. Brush or roll on boxes, lids etc and pay special attention to the exposed grain/plywood edges. Works better on a hot day when the wood is warm as you get deeper penetration. Keep treating endgrain until no more is absorbed (if it needs more than three swipes use more wax in the mixture). This is nowhere near as effective as dipping in heated wax, but it is simpler.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
    Posts
    803

    Default Re: Boiled linseed oil and beeswax

    Here's a video I saw on youtube last night regarding this:


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
    Posts
    803

    Default Re: Boiled linseed oil and beeswax

    .

    Also, regarding sealing or painting the hive, I found this interesting article on Corwin Bell's site:

    Should I weatherize my new top bar hive?

    .

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
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    803

    Default Re: Boiled linseed oil and beeswax

    .

    Here is a simple method from e-how:

    How to Make a Beeswax Wood Finish

    .

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
    Posts
    803

    Default Re: Boiled linseed oil and beeswax

    .

    Does anyone have a huge problem with applying a good natural beeswax - by itself - such as the following?

    Daddy Van's All Natural Unscented Beeswax Furniture Polish

    http://www.amazon.com/Daddy-Vans-Nat...7279613&sr=1-3

    .

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Huntington ,VT, USA
    Posts
    256

    Default Re: Boiled linseed oil and beeswax

    Pure beeswax is way way too hard to be applied directly to wood. You can apply it melted, but it is tricky and a lot of work to keep it from glopping up the surface. And it will normally fail to bond well to the wood, unless the wood too is warm enough to keep it melted for a time allowing it to soak in a bit.

    Normally the wax is cut with either an oil (linseed, walnut,tung mineral...) or a solvent (turps, mineral spirits, naptha...) this will soften it enough to be applied at room temp and allow excess to be buffed off. Solvents will evaporate off after time, oils will remain, and tend to create a darker finish.

    Also, Boiled linseed oil is no longer "boiled" but instead has had driers added to speed the oxidation (curing/drying) of the oil. Most of these are heavy metal salts and should not be used in a "natural" finish, if by "natural" you mean non-toxic. Raw linseed is better suited if you want non-toxic...but it takes a long long time to dry.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
    Posts
    803

    Default Re: Boiled linseed oil and beeswax

    .

    Windfall,

    Your input is very much appreciated.

    So using raw linseed with beeswax seems to best way to go, from what I gather so far - at least to keep things as natural or non-toxic as possible.

    .

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
    Posts
    803

    Default Re: Boiled linseed oil and beeswax

    .

    Milk paint?

    Tung Oil?

    Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.

    http://www.realmilkpaint.com/oil.html

    .

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Amelia, VA
    Posts
    34

    Default Re: Boiled linseed oil and beeswax

    I'm really loving all the input here. Seems like there's not much out there that is "natural." I was trying to apply the qualifier of "if you wouldn't put it on your skin, don't put it on you hive." I guess boiled linseed is no longer natural, with heavy metals in it now. I might as well ust the napthenate i bought two years ago.
    Obstacles are there for a reason. They give us a chance to show how badly we want something.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
    Posts
    803

    Default Re: Boiled linseed oil and beeswax

    .

    http://www.realmilkpaint.com/products.html

    http://www.realmilkpaint.com/facts.html

    Can Real Milk Paint be used outdoors?
    Real Milk Paint is very durable to the weather. For furniture we recommend painting to your liking and allowing the furniture to sit under a covered porch for about two weeks before full exposure. The paint will continue to get tougher as the moisture passes through the paint. For exterior use, a few weeks without heavy precipitation is recommended.

    Is milk paint dangerous?
    Milk paint is very environmentally friendly, you can throw old paint on your garden without harm. Caution should be used while painting to prevent paint from getting in the eyes. Burning may occur because of the lime content. Also, wear gloves if you have sensitive skin. Always flush and wash eyes and hands thoroughly with water.

    What will milk paint stick to?
    Real Milk Paint is best applied to raw wood or unsealed walls or wall board. When refinishing antiques, be sure the surface is very clean, a light sanding would be necessary. Tri Sodium Phosphate is a good cleaner after a piece of furniture is stripped to remove any impurities left on the surface. Milk paint does not stick well to new metal surface, plastics, or oil base paints or finishes.

    After the non toxic paint has dried 3-4 hours you may top coat with varnish, oil finish, Pure Tung Oil, lacquer, or wax.

    ADVANTAGES:

    Sticks to raw wood, plaster, dry wall, stone, unsealed brick and concrete
    No Primer need on raw wood and porous surfaces
    Sticks to latex with the addition of Ultra Bond
    Easy to use, water-based formula
    Each bag contains everything needed, just add water
    Remains useable for a minimum of two weeks after mixing with water
    Does not congeal to a blob
    Environmentally friendly, non toxic paint
    Non-toxic Paint
    Does not contain radioactive Kaolin Clays as a filler
    Traditional color palette, based on antique painted furniture
    Virtually no odor
    No residual odor after drying
    Dries fast (30 minutes to 4 hours depending ambient temperature)


    .

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
    Posts
    803

    Default Re: Boiled linseed oil and beeswax

    .

    The more I look into this, the more I think this may be the ticket. Plus, just think of all the wacky color combinations that can be incorporated. If you build these things, people would be DEMANDING them by the bus load !!!....(ok, well depending on your art skillz, I suppose).

    But check this out. He adds the tung oil DIRECT into the paint mixture. He claims that it will give the paint 10X longevity:







    .

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Niskayuna, NY, USA
    Posts
    97

    Default Re: Boiled linseed oil and beeswax

    I coated my THB with pure beeswax, inside and out. I used a heat gun (paint stripping type) to heat the wood so that the wood itself was hot enough to melt the block of wax. The wax gets absorbed into the wood. Just heat the wood until hot enough to melt the wax. Move the heat gun down to heat another area and follow with the wax block. So far it's only been one season, so I don't know the longevity.

    I make wooden longbows for archery and have used parafin wax to waterproof them for years, using the same method. It keeps moisture out well, and needs very little maintenance. My bows are used outdoors for hunting, and moisture in the wood would ruin a bow, making it weak and unusasble. This is what led me to use the beeswax on my hive.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
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    803

    Default Re: Boiled linseed oil and beeswax

    hive on blocks unpainted -1.JPGhive on blocks unpainted -2.JPGunpainted hive - plyboard roof.JPG.

    In case anyone is curious, I have a few pics of my yard setup with the hive. The hive, of course, is not yet painted - so this is just a mock-up.

    By the way, I went ahead and ordered the milk paint and tung oil. I chose sky blue as the color.

    .

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Amelia, VA
    Posts
    34

    Default Re: Boiled linseed oil and beeswax

    No-sage,
    I would be very interested in seeing a longbow. What type of wood do you use?
    Obstacles are there for a reason. They give us a chance to show how badly we want something.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Amelia, VA
    Posts
    34

    Default Re: Boiled linseed oil and beeswax

    PatBeek,
    What material are you using as a lid? It almost looks like a melamine or cement board.
    Obstacles are there for a reason. They give us a chance to show how badly we want something.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
    Posts
    803

    Default Re: Boiled linseed oil and beeswax

    Quote Originally Posted by rtsquirrel View Post
    PatBeek,
    What material are you using as a lid? It almost looks like a melamine or cement board.
    It IS cement board. However, the cement board is screwed to the wooden lid, so there's no direct contact inside the hive to the cement board. So to me it seems like it's going to be a great barrier for rain, sun, etc. The overhang of the cement board will even protect the bees from rain when they walk out on the bee landing, and to minimize rain going into the hive through the opening.

    It's a tad heavy, but not too cumbersome.

    .

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Amelia, VA
    Posts
    34

    Default Re: Boiled linseed oil and beeswax

    I like it. I was planning on using a different material for my lids, but I like the cementboard idea. I bet the weight of it will keep it on the hive.
    Obstacles are there for a reason. They give us a chance to show how badly we want something.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Brainerd, MN
    Posts
    533

    Default Re: Boiled linseed oil and beeswax

    Might be a silly question, but how warm does it need to get outside for me to start applying my linseed oil/wax to my hives?

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
    Posts
    803

    Default Re: Boiled linseed oil and beeswax

    Quote Originally Posted by Bush_84 View Post
    Might be a silly question, but how warm does it need to get outside for me to start applying my linseed oil/wax to my hives?
    Bush 84,

    What do you think about the milk paint and tung oil?

    Beware, if you get the boiled linseed oil, it will contain additives which may not be to the liking of the bees. You may want to make sure you find the raw linseed oil.

    Regarding the optimum temperature needed to conduct these procedures, I'm not sure. Fortunately for me I live in Florida, so I don't really have to wrestle too much with that issue.

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