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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,408

    Default Re: BWrangler Update

    The three or four Top Bar nucs I grew this past season has confirmed, for me, what is being said in this thread about new combs. Almost the moment the bees were taken off their old framed combs, they rapidly built themselves new combs on the top bars, then filled them with brood and supplies - it was astounding. The nucs given this care, continued to perform amazingly well afterwards, too.

    I'm anxiously awaiting the first signs of the expected wildflower flow, so I can try forcing some new comb on many other nucs, too.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Casper, Wy, USA
    Posts
    806

    Default Re: BWrangler Update

    Hi Guys

    The malathion was provided free of charge by my county health department. Unknown to me, they were spraying to control the West Nile Virus. The beeyard took two direct hits. The hives were wet both times.

    The irony - As the hives continued to languish at my river yard, I moved them to a new agricultural location hoping it would jump start some forage or feeding, etc. I put them right in the spray.

    The malathion just accelerated the end result. I suspect without the spray damage, a few hives would have made it through the winter and then perished the following spring. With the spray damage they all bit the dust that fall.

    Regards - Dennis
    I once wrangled bees. But now, I know better, so I do better.
    http://talkingstick.me/category/bees/

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,113

    Default Re: BWrangler Update

    Ah yes, I remember now.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    6,065

    Default Re: BWrangler Update

    Amazing.

    In my country spraying contractors are required to take extreme care around beehives and could be in serious trouble if they sprayed some.

    Malathion would have had to be part of the cause. It is a residual OP that may remain active on a painted surface for several months. There is no way it would not have affected your bees.

    Anyhow, to pick up on something else you said, what is slow motion CCD? Is it a recognised condition?
    44 years, been commercial, outfits up to 4000 hives, now 120 hives and 200 nucs as a hobby, selling bees. T (mostly).

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
    Posts
    2,775

    Default Re: BWrangler Update

    Someone wrote:

    I hope some beekeepers have bees that can survive a CCD infected hive.

    Don't hold your breath. It seems to kill 90 percent a year. Soon, nothing has survived.

    As far as old comb(someif from the 60's we think), it is not the age, but rather the pathogens contained that are detrimental(assuming no miticides). We have had our old equipment sterilized and see no difference from the hives started on foundation.

    Crazy Roland

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Whatcom, Washington, USA
    Posts
    146

    Default Re: BWrangler Update

    Quote Originally Posted by BWrangler View Post
    Unfortunately, in this yard, they were all weak and declining. I thought that resulted from a couple of very poor nutritional seasons and very old queens...
    Hello Dennis,
    Thank you for sharing your experience.
    You mention that this yard had some very old queens. I thought that with checkerboarding, the queens get superseded automatically annually, or were these hives not CB'd like some of your other ones?
    Thanks
    Serge

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    2,726

    Default Re: BWrangler Update

    Quote Originally Posted by BWrangler View Post
    - come back next spring and find all the bees dead and all that new equipment chronically infected with CCD virus.
    I have not been tracking CCD closely, but the last I heard was that the cause of CCD is still unknown. Again, my information could be very old. What is it that makes you certain that a "CCD virus" was the one of the causes of the decline. Did you have any of the bees or comb tested?

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Casper, Wy, USA
    Posts
    806

    Default Re: BWrangler Update

    Quote Originally Posted by SERGE View Post
    Hello Dennis,
    ... I thought that with checkerboarding, the queens get superseded automatically annually, or were these hives not CB'd like some of your other ones?
    Thanks
    Serge
    Hi Serge

    That hasn't been my experience.

    Regards - Dennis
    I once wrangled bees. But now, I know better, so I do better.
    http://talkingstick.me/category/bees/

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Casper, Wy, USA
    Posts
    806

    Default Re: BWrangler Update

    Hi AstroBee

    Randy Oliver has a very interesting series called "Sick Bees" in the American Bee Journal. He has been able to replicate the classic fast CCD and a new slow motion kind of CCD. It's an interesting read some of which is available at:

    http://scientificbeekeeping.com/colony-health/

    Roland(above and in the ABJ?, I've lost the references) and others? have been able to use infected equipment after irradiating it.

    Both point to a virus source.

    My bout with the classic variety happened so fast that I didn't have any real observations. It was booming hives one day. Three days later CCD hives.

    The slow motion variety I've recently experienced, gave me lots of time to observe, interact with and think about the process. And I couldn't have designed a better way to evenly inoculate an entire yard than splitting it the way I did.

    Regards - Dennis
    I once wrangled bees. But now, I know better, so I do better.
    http://talkingstick.me/category/bees/

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
    Posts
    2,775

    Default Re: BWrangler Update

    Yes, I have reused bad equipment after it has been sterilized, with no re-occurrence.

    Credit must be given to Hackenburg, who I believe was the first to report that irradiation was successful.

    Crazy Roland

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massillon, Ohio
    Posts
    3,440

    Default Re: BWrangler Update

    Is Acetic Acid fumigation still believed to be an effective method to sterilize suspect CCD equipment?
    To everything there is a season....

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX, USA
    Posts
    1,779

    Default Re: BWrangler Update

    Time to be a gypsy again, 2014 will be my prep year, my bees want a better area with actual rainfall.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
    Posts
    2,775

    Default Re: BWrangler Update

    Is Acetic Acid fumigation still believed to be an effective method to sterilize suspect CCD equipment?

    I never knew it was known to be effective in the first place. Irradiation is , per Hackenberg.

    Crazy Roland

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massillon, Ohio
    Posts
    3,440

    Default Re: BWrangler Update

    I found this presentation by Steve Pernal regarding comb sterilization. Interesting study.

    http://www.extension.org/pages/30369...-acid-and-heat
    To everything there is a season....

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