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Thread: Testing Honey

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default Testing Honey

    What's the contact info for having one's honey tested at Penn State?
    Regards, Barry

  2. #2
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    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Default Re: Commercial beekeeping and the historical decreasing use of harsh to soft treatmen

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    What's the contact info for having one's honey tested at Penn State?
    Hmm. Good question. I'll try to find Maryanne Fraziers' contact info and ask her. Unless Dean has that answer handy. ?
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Commercial beekeeping and the historical decreasing use of harsh to soft treatmen

    I'm not sure if this is on topic or not, but I figure if Barry is asking.....

    There are no more cost sharing funds, the testing costs $284 a sample (!)

    This is What Maryann sent me:



    Instructions for submitting samples for Pesticide Analysis of Honey Bee Colony Matrices (honey, wax, pollen, bees, brood, etc.)

    The following matrices can be submitted for pesticide analysis:

    Honey and nectar

    Pollen (trapped pollen or bee bread)

    Brood

    Adult bees

    Wax

    Following these steps to collect, prepare and ship samples for analysis:

    1) Collect samples

    Honey and/or nectar should consist of 2 ounces.

    Pollen collected from pollen traps should consist of 2 ounces. Bee bread samples collected from within the hive should consist of pollen randomly collected from 30 cells.

    Wax comb, foundation, or samples from blocks should consist of 2 ounces.

    Adult bees and/or brood (dead or alive) should consist of at least 2 ounces.

    2) Package samples

    All samples should be collected into clean, crush-proof, leak-proof, plastic containers (no glass please) and labeled (see note below). Pollen and wax samples can be collected directly into. Sample containers of honey/nectar and bees should then be placed into zip-lock bags.

    3) Label each sample

    Each individual container must be labeled using permanent marker. Each individual sample must have the following information on the sample container:

    Your name

    Date collected

    Colony number (or code) or batch designation (for honey or trapped pollen samples).

    4) Freeze all samples

    After collecting and labeling, place all samples in the freezer until time of shipping. All samples should be frozen at the time of shipping. This is especially critical for brood and bee samples.

    5) Ship samples, data sheets and check

    Remove samples from freezer and place in insulated bag or small cooler with freeze pack (blue ice the type used in picnic coolers). Ship overnight or second day to:

    Maryann Frazier

    Department of Entomology

    501 ASI Building

    University Park, PA 16802

    Include one data sheet (below) per sample.

    Include a check made out to Penn State University to cover your cost.

    $142.00/sample

    Please DO NOT ship on a Friday or the day before a holiday.

    Please be advised that the average turn around time for sample analysis is three weeks.

    Questions or concerns contact:

    Maryann Frazier

    Phone: (814) 865-4621

    Fax: (814) 865-3048

    Email: mfrazier@psu.edu

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Data Sheet (include one per sample)

    Beekeeper Name ________________________

    Address ________________________

    ________________________

    Phone Number ________________________

    Email Address ________________________

    Colony Identification (number or name)__________

    Colony location _________________________ (state and county)

    Colony health at time of sampling:

    Seasonal information (movement, excessive swarming, crops pollinated, etc.:

    Why are you submitting these samples?

    Please include any additional information that you feel is relevant.

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Hawaii
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    Default Queen's For Sale

    can a moderator please remove this post?
    Last edited by onarock; 12-01-2011 at 08:24 PM. Reason: wrong place

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Herrick, SD USA
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    Default Re: Commercial beekeeping and the historical decreasing use of harsh to soft treatmen

    Appreciate the info Dean. I'm definitely going to be sending in a sample. A sampling of drums in a 28,000 lb lot (I will probably go a bit larger than that) would only be a .01 per lb., i would be more than happy to share the results or compare them with anyone elses. Sounds like a bargain for anyone wanting proof that their treatment free product is everything that it claims to be.
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Commercial beekeeping and the historical decreasing use of harsh to soft treatmen

    I wonder if an independent lab not associated with beekeeping would be competitive in pricing? Anyone know of any? I'd love to have mine tested.
    Regards, Barry

  7. #7
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    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Default Re: Commercial beekeeping and the historical decreasing use of harsh to soft treatmen

    You aught to be able to find one in Chicago, don't ya think?
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Lemont, Il U.S.A.
    Posts
    118

    Default Re: Testing Honey

    One of my buddies works in and EPA lab downtown. He's always asking me to test my honey but I have not taken him up on the offer. What are you looking for anyway? It's in the water you drink every day.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
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    Default Re: Testing Honey

    Not necassarily stajerc61. I doubt that what you would find in honey is in the water we drink. Tests done by Penn State have found presence of over 170 different chemical compounds not chemically part of what honey is.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

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