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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Owensboro, KY
    Posts
    149

    Default Making Your Own Inner Covers

    Does anyone here make their own inner cover?

    I was looking today, and several companies offer a 3/4" pine plywood inner covers that looks easy to make.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Alachua County, FL, USA
    Posts
    6,851

    Default Re: Making Your Own Inner Covers

    Inner covers are protected from the weather and can be any thickness. If you have any kind of saw you can cut inner covers.
    americasbeekeeper.com
    beekeeper@americasbeekeeper.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Clark, Mo, USA
    Posts
    24

    Default Re: Making Your Own Inner Covers

    I was wondering about making inner covers out of 5/8 or 3/4 plywood. I was thinking there must be a reason that the manufactured ones are pretty complex instead of a solid flat piece. It would be way cheaper to make them out of plywood so I hope it doesn't matter.

    Jordan

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Clark county, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    220

    Default Re: Making Your Own Inner Covers

    Not a solid flat piece because it needs to be raised 3/8in above the frames.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Bon Aqua, Tn USA
    Posts
    330

    Default Re: Making Your Own Inner Covers

    I just cut luan or whatever I have the width of the super and take 3/4" deep strips X 1" wide down each side and across the ends, glue it and that's it. That way it If it wears out in a few years, just make another one. I also put the cut out in the center for feeding. Set the strips at the edge of your cutout and it will sit up 3/4" above your top super, or turn it over flat and you can feed sugar during the winter. If you want it deeper just use deeper strips around the edges.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,320

    Default Re: Making Your Own Inner Covers

    I don't use many inner covers, I have one or two that are still serviceable, and they are in place, but mostly I use covers of my own design, similar to migratory covers, but with a bee space rim and a notch to provide a small entrance when the cover is aligned squarely atop the uppermost super.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Otero County, New Mexico, USA
    Posts
    1,384

    Default Re: Making Your Own Inner Covers

    I drill a 70mm hole or two in mine for a feeder jar.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Pueblo, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    671

    Default Re: Making Your Own Inner Covers

    I don't use inner covers either and just use a piece of plywood as a top cover, but all my hives are top entrance. I am going to glue and fasten a few strips of wood on the short ends of the cover to make them into migratory covers. Now I'm not going to migrate but I recently visisted an apiary with all migratory covers and they are so much easier to lift and move around than a flat piece of plywood. Mine are currently on top of quilt boxes for the winter. They will all get modified in the spring. It is also still viable for me to flip my solid bottom board up on top of the hive in the spring when I go to SBBs so the bottom board can have the hole in it for feeding or you can make a special one but I, personally, have never had any problems running a piece of plywood on top (no inner cover).

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Alachua County, FL, USA
    Posts
    6,851

    Default Re: Making Your Own Inner Covers

    I do not use migratory or telescoping covers. All my covers are feeder covers, a piece of plywood with a half inch to inch hole in the middle for a mason jar. I put a block of wood over the hole when not feeding. I have a set of black covers when small hive beetles are strong from recent rains, gray when there are a few SHB and white when there is no SHB concern. Sometimes I double stack feeder covers with offset holes when not feeding and it is hot and sunny. The feeder covers have less warping and problems than the migratory covers I used to use.
    http://americasbeekeeper.com/more_splits.jpg
    http://www.americasbeekeeper.com/USF%20splits.JPG
    americasbeekeeper.com
    beekeeper@americasbeekeeper.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Pueblo, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    671

    Default Re: Making Your Own Inner Covers

    Im going to put a 1" hole in mine also for feeding. I like the block idea instead of a can lid. We get hardly any rain so either would work well for me.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Johnson City, TN
    Posts
    380

    Default Re: Making Your Own Inner Covers

    I make my own, I copied the wintering inner cover from Brushy. I use 1x2 for the rim and 3/8 for the center. It is cool because you can use a mason jar in it for the feeder. You can also put a solid lid in the hole fill the deep side with sugar candy,let it harden. Then just flip it over the moistier from the inside the hive softens the candy so they can eat it over winter. Or you can use the deep side up and put a layer of insulation over the winter. lots of options. All I have is a table saw. I am getting a dado blade to make it faster, right now I just make multiple passes to notch out the wood.
    All beekeepers can agree on one thing, and that one thing is, that all beekeepers can't agree on one thing.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    3,761

    Default Re: Making Your Own Inner Covers

    I pretty much do the same thing as beehonest, copying an existing cover. I do have a dado so it goes pretty quick. Making woodenware is great during the winter!
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Bloomington, IN, USA
    Posts
    307

    Default Re: Making Your Own Inner Covers

    I have made several from old cupboard doors found at the Re-Use store. The frame is thicker than the center pane and work very well. Many of the doors only have to be trimmed a very little off of one end. The center pane can be cut to have an oval opening. They usually cost me about $1
    Good luck!

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Hudson, WI USA
    Posts
    2,177

    Default Re: Making Your Own Inner Covers

    Feed Bag Inner Covers (FBIC's) are the redneck version of an inner cover that I use in the summer on my 10 frame hives. Just cut a chicken feed bag to size, and lay it on the top of the frames. I also have these on top of my nuc's at the time of writing. The beauty of the FBIC is that it just peels off the top of the frames, is free (my wife has chickens), and takes up next to no storage space. BTW the FBIC is not my invention; I have seen it here on beesource and also on some youtube videos. My only contribution is the acronym FBIC.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Crystal Water, Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    900

    Default Re: Making Your Own Inner Covers

    I have all sorts of material used as an inner cover but the FBIC is a new one for me!
    I use 3 ply ( a little thicker would be better as the real thin stuff can warp from any moisture)

    The reason I use them is simply to stop the bees building foundation into the lid. We never have to feed but it can get warm here and the inner cover is a little added insulation. Lino was very popular in the past.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Owensboro, KY
    Posts
    149

    Default Re: Making Your Own Inner Covers

    Thanks for all of the input.

    Would there be anything wrong with using a 3/4" piece of poplar plywood cut to size, and then gluing a 1" X 1" piece of trim around the upper edge to hold the outer cover above the inner cover?

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Bon Aqua, Tn USA
    Posts
    330

    Default Re: Making Your Own Inner Covers

    Sounds good to me.
    Quote Originally Posted by roostershooter7 View Post
    Thanks for all of the input.

    Would there be anything wrong with using a 3/4" piece of poplar plywood cut to size, and then gluing a 1" X 1" piece of trim around the upper edge to hold the outer cover above the inner cover?

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Johnson City, TN
    Posts
    380

    Default Re: Making Your Own Inner Covers

    Give it a try, that is how we have new products. Some has an idea and tries it. But I will frown on poplar simply because I have tried it. I figured it would be better quality, but the moisture content inside the hive caused it to mold and start to break down. I switched to exterior grade wood and haven't had another problem. All the moistier seems to build in the top of the hive?
    All beekeepers can agree on one thing, and that one thing is, that all beekeepers can't agree on one thing.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    645

    Default Re: Making Your Own Inner Covers

    I am trying some inner covers with 3/8 rim below so bee space room above the frames and have a 3 inch rim on top. On the 3/8 side make a 1.5 inch notch with a closeable door

    Becomes very versatile
    -For summer I will screen the center hole and have 8 screened 1 inch holes(2 per side and screen on the inside) to vent the hive for cooling and drying honey.
    -For cold weather, can place a two inch piece of styrofoam for top insulation in the 3 inch top rim or plug/tape the vent holes
    -Can remove the center screen(and styrofoam) and place a rim around the center hole and fill with fondant, or wetted sugar.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Anderson, Indiana, USA
    Posts
    78

    Default Re: Making Your Own Inner Covers

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul McCarty View Post
    I drill a 70mm hole or two in mine for a feeder jar.
    american standard of measure = ? help me out I live in the good ol USA and I dont speak metric

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