Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 40 of 40
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    havana fl
    Posts
    1,340

    Default Re: Dealing with SHB's

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    SHB traps on bottom boards are usually used w/ half a Checkmite strip attatched. I guess that is used to kill the larval stage of SHB growth.
    No this is effective in killing adults. One side of the cardboard is removed so the corrugation is exposed; the checkmite is stapled to this side and placed with the checkmit down. The beetles hide under the cardboard and are killed by contact with the checkmite. If ya have larva crawling they are not hiding under cardboard they are on their way to the edge of the hive to fall on the ground and pupate. If ya have trays under your hive and dont keep up with them it too becomes a breeding ground. Some folks use lime in the trays and it has proven effective. Yaall Yankees are lucky not to have much of a problem. Keep your fingers crossed.
    Im really not that serious

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Limestone Co, Alabama
    Posts
    1,675

    Default Re: Dealing with SHB's

    Yall, I cant be sure but I think that a greatly reduced hive entrance, and only one of them at that, helps knock back SHB numbers, at least as well as full Sun. My entrance reducer holes are about 4 inches wide by .375 inches high by maybe 1.50 to 2 inches deep. I know that this seems insufficient but even in hives with wall to wall bees I have never seen a real blockage or traffic jam of bees trying to enter or leave even during the busiest times of the year.

    I also see how fewer inspections or beekeeper interventions can have a positive effect on SHB numbers. I use migratory tops. That means that when I do pop-a-top I can do it quickly and when I do so the first thing I see are several small groups or circles of bees on the top bars, each circle is surrounding and staring down a knot of SHB. It looks to me like the bees are a pack of Zombies who are daring a gaggle of sorority sisters trapped in their midst, to make a break for it. Later in the year, I also find similar groups or gaggles of SHB thoroughly stuck or propolised to death on the top bars. A very rewarding sight in deed.
    Scrapfe---Never believe anything in politics until it has been officially denied.--Otto von Bismarck.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    DeSoto County, MS, USA
    Posts
    137

    Default Re: Dealing with SHB's

    I have been beekeeping for 6 years. I remember the first time I saw a bug that looked like a beetle in my first hive, and at that time my only hive. I called my mentor, a commerical beekeeper and told him, "I think I have a small problem." I told him what I saw and his response was, "You don't have a small problem you have a big problem." Fortunately, my hive was strong and the shb never got critical. When I expanded the number of hives, I asked a local land owner about placing some hives on his property. He took me to look at several parcels of land. The one I chose was a reclaimed gravel pit. It was a good choice for two reasons. First, from early spring to late october there is something in bloom. This man and his family also use it to dove hunt and plant sunflowers. Secondly, the shb has not been a problem in these hives. While there are shb in them I have never had to treat these hives at all for shb. Not even with beetle traps. I think it is because of the soil. During the summer it is as hard as a rock and hot, filled with gravel and course, rough soil. My other hives are located in places with soft garden type soil and shb has been a headach. I think the soil at the gravel pit is not good for their reproduction cycle. Placing them there was just dumb luck....I knew nothing of the shb life cycle at that time.

    Now that I have talked about this I am sure I have jinxted myself and the shb will give me a fit in these hives.

    Dave

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    8,421

    Default Re: Dealing with SHB's

    Soil does make a difference according to the article. They prefer sandy soils and not clay. So maybe crushed stone might be a good bed for your hives?

    Scrapfe, what you see on top is not an indication of what may be below which is what would concern me. I saw one or two beetles on top at most. After a quick frost I saw about a dozen dead ones in the bottom tray without a trap. I like the idea of putting a trap in the tray because it is non invasive so next season I will try that. I will also be on the lookout for tainted honey in the spring when I examine the frames.
    As a rule we spend hours picking Japanese beetles, squash beetles, and cucumber beetles from our plants. We will just add SHB's to our list. No biggie.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Limestone Co, Alabama
    Posts
    1,675

    Default Re: Dealing with SHB's

    Quote Originally Posted by Acebird View Post
    ... Scrapfe, what you see on top is not an indication of what may be below which is what would concern me...
    This is true, but when you even pop-the-top you are at best creating a distraction and this allows the SHB to make a break for it and run off and hide again from the guard bees. Every top bar tab you pry up (especially in the late summer or fall) is a potential SHB nursery until the bees get her propolised down again nice and tight. Yes, and at some point you will need to dig deeper to verify that you don't have a SHB problem. Two or even a dozen (depending on the time of year) SHB corralled on the top bars of the top box or super are not a big problemo especially for a strong colony. Learn from what you see above and judge from that, what conditions are like in the rest of the hive. SHB control is at best an ongoing learning experience, meaning you have to keep thinking and learning, no one can ‘learn’ it to you.

    I have been told that SHBs can go airborne and fly 5 miles at a time. Unless mama and dada SHB ckecks out the soils' pupation potential in advance of starting their family I think err long it will not matter where your hives are.
    Scrapfe---Never believe anything in politics until it has been officially denied.--Otto von Bismarck.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    8,421

    Default Re: Dealing with SHB's

    After realizing that I don't think the small pad under the hive makes any difference. Even the whole chicken yard is but a spot in the middle of many acres outside the chickens reach. I do think the articles give me more insight on what to look for in the honey and combs for the larvae state. I wonder how much of the tainted honey makes it into the jar on large operations. Certainly there is some.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    24,488

    Default Re: Dealing with SHB's

    Tainted w/ what? There is very little pesticide residue in honey. What there is is mostly found in the wax, most pesticides being oil based chemicals. What traces occur in honey are quite small in ppm rates. Tolerances for fluvalinate or chumophous are 100s of ppm and findings are less than 10 and often less than 5. According to what I saw in a chart Maryanne Frazier showed at our mtng just a few days ago.
    Mark Berninghausen "Ships at a distance have every man's wish on board." Zora Neale Hurston

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    8,421

    Default Re: Dealing with SHB's

    No not pesticides, beetle poop. It discolors honey and causes fermentation.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    24,488

    Default Re: Dealing with SHB's

    Really? Is that what the paper said?
    Mark Berninghausen "Ships at a distance have every man's wish on board." Zora Neale Hurston

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    8,421

    Default Re: Dealing with SHB's

    Honey spoilage, page 9.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  11. #31
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Garland, Bladen County, NC, USA
    Posts
    2,771

    Default Re: Dealing with SHB's

    Quote Originally Posted by Acebird View Post
    Honey spoilage, page 9.
    Only after the colony has been slimed. Do colonies get slimed that far north.... Utica? Takes some pretty sustained heat and humidity to do that down here. Really high temps and humidity before the move into the honey.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    24,488

    Default Re: Dealing with SHB's

    Not very often, but apparently it happens in France.
    Mark Berninghausen "Ships at a distance have every man's wish on board." Zora Neale Hurston

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    8,421

    Default Re: Dealing with SHB's

    Quote Originally Posted by hpm08161947 View Post
    Do colonies get slimed that far north.... Utica?
    How would I know with two years experience. I barely know what to look for but I am glad you commented. Thinking back to my first honey harvest I saw darker cells of honey next to very light cells and it concerned me. That first year's harvest was so good tasting the concern withered quickly. All of the honey (two top boxes) we harvested this year was darker and I didn't even think to look for SHB larvae. I was hopeful that last winter would have killed them all (a perception some people have up here) and I wouldn't see any this year. That was not the case. I believe I saw more SHB this year because I know what they are and where to look for them not because there was more of them.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    24,488

    Default Re: Dealing with SHB's

    Maybe what you saw were dermested beetles and not small hive beetles.

    You have nothing to fear from sections of comb containing darker or lighter honey than other areas of comb. That has nothing to do w/ the insects inside your hives, other than the honeybees.
    Mark Berninghausen "Ships at a distance have every man's wish on board." Zora Neale Hurston

  15. #35
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Garland, Bladen County, NC, USA
    Posts
    2,771

    Default Re: Dealing with SHB's

    ACE - if they were slimed.... you would not mistake it! It's a very disgusting sight.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    8,421

    Default Re: Dealing with SHB's

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dermestidae

    This here? Maybe the black carpet beetle eating the chicken feathers and dead bees.
    I am pretty sure they are SHB though when you really look close.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    24,488

    Default Re: Dealing with SHB's

    Is the black carpet beetle the one w/ a band of white across its' back? They remind me of Belted Galoway Cattle. No detrimental effects in beehives.
    Mark Berninghausen "Ships at a distance have every man's wish on board." Zora Neale Hurston

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Bryan, TX
    Posts
    115

    Default Re: Dealing with SHB's

    First year, very dry here, but have not had much of a problem. Screened bottom board and the hive is 18" above the ground. My chickens are under there scratching daily. If and when larva come out, they are comsumed and converted to eggs and fertalizer.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    8,421

    Default Re: Dealing with SHB's

    If I had my hives 18" above the ground I wouldn't be able to reach the top two supers. What do you do about the other 80,000 acres of land around the chicken yard?
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Limestone Co, Alabama
    Posts
    1,675

    Default Re: Dealing with SHB's

    Quote Originally Posted by Acebird View Post
    ...Maybe ...black carpet beetle[s] eating the chicken feathers and dead bees...
    http://www.brushymountainbeefarm.com...HiveBeetle.asp

    http://www.beegreenphilly.com/category/blog/

    Carpet beetles! Eating chicken feathers? Why maybee even leather or violin beetles, OMG!!! ‘Acebyrd‘, I swear. I’m a gonna start calling you “Jaybyrd” instead of 'Acebyrd’. We buy your books and send you to school and how do you repay us? Why you dog ear ALL the pages and then you gnaw the corners off the book covers. And still we ain’t learned you nothing.

    In profile SHB looks a lot like a Frisbee and he or she can go where no bee can follow. That is why I like to use window screen on my feeder covers, and make do without inter-covers, and I also don’t use metal frame rests or spacers so that I can reduce the number of places where SHB can hole up and hide out from the bees. I even go as far as to smear glue on the cracks and fill in all 4 interior super seams in order to deny the SHB a convenient and did I say safe and secure place to deposit her eggs.

    Check out the first and second links.

    Now check out pictures #1 & #14 in the link below.
    http://peacebeefarm.blogspot.com/200...1_archive.html
    If your top box looks like pic #1, then you don’t have a SHB problem. (most likely) Picture #14 is the bee behavior I was referring to that needs encouraging and we should respect during our inspections. Good bees are on the look out for SHB 24-7. You and I… well not that much.

    Do be advised that I have observed a guard bee flying off with a small hive beetle larva. I fear she droped him or her somewhere far far away from the hive where the larva may, or may not, be able to pupate and return. Anyway, I think the larva can crawl far enough that crushed stone, carpet, plastic or Guard Star may be inefective at controlling SHB and the best one can do with the above methods is manage SHB.
    Scrapfe---Never believe anything in politics until it has been officially denied.--Otto von Bismarck.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads