Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Types of Honey

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Murfreesboro, TN, USA
    Posts
    53

    Default Types of Honey

    How do you get a specific type of honey? For instance, if I want my bees to make sourwood honey, how would I do that? Or, in the spring or fall when there's a flow and many things are blooming at once, how do you tell what kinds of flowers the bees are working?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Manitowoc WI USA
    Posts
    353

    Default Re: Types of Honey

    I don't think you have much say in the matter. The bees have their own mind about those things.:-)

    I have noticed different coloration in honey, even on the same frame. Although I am not yet experienced in the different colors or tastes, one can certainly separate the honey when scraping it from the frame.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Dexter, Maine
    Posts
    1,053

    Default Re: Types of Honey

    You gotta ask the girls, real nice like.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Telford, TN, USA
    Posts
    18

    Default Re: Types of Honey

    We move our hives to the mountains about two weeks before the honey flow right under and around sourwood trees that are getting ready to bloom. Then right before the bloom we add supers to the hives. There is no way to guarantee it is sourwood honey but we extract this honey separately and if it is very very light, like sourwood should be, I bring it to two or three of my beekeeping friends with years of experience and ask them to try it.

    I have a friend with lilac honey, lilac oil is added to give it flavor, just a bit though. I have heard of people adding various flavorings to honey to create a flavored honey. Form some who pollinate crops, they are moving their hives to multiple acres of oranges lets say for a few weeks to pollinate. They many get orange blossom honey. Though I have little to no experience with pollination so maybe someone else could add a bit of experience to that.

    The National Honey Board sells a great pamphlet that shows honey from different nectar sources. Shows the variations of the white firefox and clover honey to the dark, molases looking buckwheat honey. Again, you need a large area of a single source of nectar to get these single source honeys and then surely maybe a bee found something else to throw in too. Check their website, lots of good honey info.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads