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Thread: Wax moths?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    Madison, CT
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    71

    Default Wax moths?

    I found a cluster of moth larvae wrapped up in a gauzy mess on one of my bottom boards. They are not in the area where there is wax, they are below my screen on the screened bottom boards. Could they still be wax moths?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Auburn, NY
    Posts
    112

    Default Re: Wax moths?

    yep, eating fallen wax scales. and building up in a place where the bees cannot get them...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Madison, CT
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    71

    Default Re: Wax moths?

    OK, so then the next question is, how do I treat that? I have menthol chips for storing unused hive boxes, but how do I treat for moths in boxes the bees are still using??

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Mtn. View, Arkansas, USA
    Posts
    1,277

    Default Re: Wax moths?

    If they are building on the sticky board below the screen, remove the sticky board and let the debris fall to the ground instead of building up on the sticky board. On your next full inspection remove the hive bodies and scrape the cocoons and webbing off. The bees will control wax moths if the moths are in an area the bees can patrol and keep clean.

    Comb in storage is protected with paradichlorobenzene, freezing the combs, or bacillus thuringiensis spray. The empty boxes need only be stacked where light can enter them and wax moths will not build cocoons on them.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,079

    Default Re: Wax moths?

    Quote Originally Posted by AR Beekeeper View Post
    paradichlorobenzene...or bacillus thuringiensis spray
    Not in the Treatment-Free forum.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Staunton VA
    Posts
    150

    Default Re: Wax moths?

    not much you can do in hive except take off shake bees off and freeze, store boxes apart were light and air can get in

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Decatur, GA
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: Wax moths?

    Question along these lines: I've taken one super each (plus frames) off of my two hives this weekend. The frames are in the freezer of a spare fridge and I put the medium supers in the the fridge itself. Is this adequate for winter storage? I haven't seen signs of wax moth in either hive, but as I see it, they're out of the way and in a pest-free environment. Are they good, or do I need to worry about getting them into a freezer at some point?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,380

    Default Re: Wax moths?

    If the frames/combs are frozen, it will likely be sufficient to prevent infestation by wax moth larvae.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Staunton VA
    Posts
    150

    Default Re: Wax moths?

    you can store to the open light and air, but yes a frig will work after freezing

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Harrisonville, MO
    Posts
    63

    Default Re: Wax moths?

    I checked my one and only hive this evening. And while I watching , saw two of the girls come rolling out of the hive fighting something , after they was done I saw it was a wax moth it was amazing to watch but the question is after reading on this thread do I pull the plastic sheet that I just put in for winter back out of the screened bottom or leave it in . With the sheet in they seem to hang out more on the bottom screen, but I don't want a place for the moths and shb's to cause me problems. So far this little swarm of mutts are doing a good job of keeping them self's clean. I am going to stay with a Telescoping cover this year and a bottom entrance I know Michael Bush likes top entrances, I will think about that next year if they make it this winter. I have probably fed them syrup to long but they have built up good with three mediums to winter on. Your Thoughts would be appreciated .

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,079

    Default Re: Wax moths?

    I'm having other moths trying to get in to steal honey right now. Last night after I fed sugar syrup, there were quite a number of moths gathered around to lick up the drips.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Franklin County, PA
    Posts
    486

    Default Re: Wax moths?

    I like the treatment free concept. Aside from small hive beetle traps I haven't treated. I got some equipment that had mothball smell to it and refuse to ever use mothballs with beekeeping equipment. I sanded it all and let it sit out in the rain and sanded it again. If moths don't like light like I have read on the forum before could I build a small structure with say glass and plexiglass that will allow alot of light and put the frames I'm storing in there? I don't have many frames out of use this year but I figure it would be worth asking for say next year. I only have so much freezer space so I figure a well sunlit structure might work. Does this sound feesible. Curious, Thanks for reading VW

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,079

    Default Re: Wax moths?

    The only time I can trust comb to be off the hive is when it is regularly getting pretty cold. I store them in my uninsulated shop over the winter with no problems, but just a week or two in the summer and they start tunneling through.

    I foresee trouble with a glazed structure in that it may build enough heat to melt the wax. In my view, keeping it on the hive is the best option. The bees protect and maintain it even if they don't use it for years in a row.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Franklin County, PA
    Posts
    486

    Default Re: Wax moths?

    Hi Solomon, Thank You for responding. This will only be my second winter with bees so I'm trying to figure how to store stuff with limited freezer space and no chemicals. I had a deep of frames in the basement over the summer and moths got into it in what seemed like an instant. Moving forward I'll keep my frames on the hives until the threat of moths passes and then when it starts to warm up again toward spring I'll just employ them on hives again. Seems logical enough. some of my shallows I have I leaned against a window and they haven't had moth issues. I figure it was the light. That was partially why I was wondering if I just had a bunch of light I could utilize it as a moth deterrent. Anyway I've seen a few moths around the hives in the past few days. I guess a few more frosty nights and the threat of them will be over. Thank You, Hope you are well. VW

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Sheboygan, WI, USA
    Posts
    127

    Default Re: Wax moths?

    This summer I was amazed to see the bald faced hornets hanging around one of my hives for a meal. They would try to catch a bee but that was too much work. Then a moth would come out and that was it. The hornet took the moth up onto a low branch near by, tore it apart and ate it right there. What a great sight! I don't think yellow jackets will do that. So then I had a few frames with wax worms on them and put them in the open but leaning against a cement block I have for a hive stand. In a day it was cleaned out by the bald faced hornets.
    To find out more about me go to
    www.broomsbylittlejohn.com

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