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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Crenshaw County, Alabama
    Posts
    2,000

    Default Trap distance from yard and how long to wait to move them?

    I've got a trap set a 1/2 mile from my bee yard location. I'm wondering how long I can leave a swarm in the trap at the trap location before moving them.

    My concerns are moving them too soon and possibly prompting them to leave and conversely letting them stay there too long and thus imprint on that spot as their hive location.

    Thoughts anyone?

    Thanks,
    Ed

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Bardstown, KY, USA
    Posts
    321

    Default Re: Trap distance from yard and how long to wait to move them?

    Quote Originally Posted by Intheswamp View Post
    I've got a trap set a 1/2 mile from my bee yard location.
    My concerns are moving them too soon and possibly prompting them to leave and conversely letting them stay there too long and thus imprint on that spot as their hive location.

    Thoughts anyone?
    First, I have nuc / swarm traps much closer - But I'm trying to capture a swarm from my own hives.... Mine are 100-200' from the hive locations. Second, when I transfer bees, I do it as the sun is going down. At least they will stay there that day. I have never had them to leave after I transferred them.....
    Grandchildren are the best.... Bees a close second....

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,880

    Default Re: Trap distance from yard and how long to wait to move them?

    A swarm imprints on it's spot as it moves in, and then again as they leave the first time of foraging. I have sometimes moved swarms as soon as they settle down, to a space in the same yard, and a lot return to the cluster location. I think that swarms leave because they are somehow dissatisfied with their new home, the new home scouts decide that one of their other choices would really have been a better choice and they go for it. I have had swarms leave because of lack of space, and ants. Also, swarms with virgin queens tend to abscond a lot, immature management decisions. Here is an example of a swarm that needed more bedrooms space and left the next morning.


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