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  1. #1
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    Default Asian honey on US shelves

    Didn't see that this has been posted on the forum yet.

    http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2011/08/honey-laundering/
    Always question Conventional Wisdom.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Asian honey on US shelves

    Yes, it was Posted last week or the week before. But, if more people here read it, that's okay.
    Mark Berninghausen
    The answers are the end. The questions are the journey. Journey on.



  3. #3
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    Default Re: Asian honey on US shelves

    I am guessing that the imported honey from china is not making it onto the shelf, but rather going to manufacture. The USDA reported that while 252 million pounds were imported last year, US beekeepers ended the year with 49 million lbs unsold. The average American only consumes 0.4 lbs per year... WE need to do something about that. People are missing out in life
    Always question Conventional Wisdom.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Asian honey on US shelves

    I've heard of tainted honey from China, and that they're selling honey sugar syrup mixture, and wonder, why do they do stuff like that? They don't play fair when they do that. I wonder if they are selling Chinese honey in Canada?
    Last edited by sammyjay; 08-26-2011 at 12:39 AM.
    Good enough is perfect - Joel Salatin

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Asian honey on US shelves

    They do stuff like that because they can and it is profitable. "Honey Blend", product name, is Rice Sugar and Honey. Says so right on the ingredients portion of the Label. I'm sure it is all above board and legal. Too bad it is in a Honeybear, er, I mean Squeeze Bear Container, and sold on the same shelf as Honey and other sweeteners.
    Mark Berninghausen
    The answers are the end. The questions are the journey. Journey on.



  6. #6
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    Default Re: Asian honey on US shelves

    Interesting Article Bluegrass

    Wow. I read the article and a bunch of the comments. That's really messed up. Lead in the honey from the shipping drums. All sorts of products claim honey in the ingredients. I wonder how much of it incorporates this cheap cut honey that is not only impure but potentially dangerous. The FDA should get on top of checking all imports not just for quality claims but for safety. They have their work cut out for them. If they banned imported honey wouldn't this solve the issue? Is enough honey produced in the U.S. To cover the demand if we stopped importing it? Interesting Article Bluegrass

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Asian honey on US shelves

    Why focus on country of origin. Instead.of quality?
    I've had local honey tested (off the health food store shelf) and found up to 30% beet sugar. "They" are those selling adulterated honey...be they Chinese or American.
    Deknow

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Asian honey on US shelves

    I watched as "country of origin" labeling (COOL) was so watered down for beef that if you read on a store label of beef patties it has 8 countries listed. So I have found the best way to combat that problem is a more educated consumer (and high gas prices doesn't hurt).
    Grandchildren are the best.... Bees a close second....

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Asian honey on US shelves

    so when your in the market and see someone buying the so called honey.must inform them about the truth and call it what it is sugar syrup i started to convert them people over back.set up a stand with china honey and your honey first let them taste yours then there brand oh ya keep a trash can near by the will spit there brand rite out.it's funny to watch they will never buy it again once they relize it tastes bad

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Asian honey on US shelves

    Quote Originally Posted by bluegrass View Post
    The USDA reported that ......... US beekeepers ended the year with 49 million lbs unsold.
    This statistic can be chalked up to when they ask the question. We, like many honey producers, don't sell our harvest in the fall when there may be a glut negatively affecting prices. While our honey would show up as unsold at year's end, it is purposefully being withheld in hopes of selling at a higher price later.

    Sheri

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Asian honey on US shelves

    Are other commodoities accounted for in this manner? Number of cattle, chickens, etc. unsold at year end? Almost seems to imply that something is unsold at year end because the seller couldn't find a buyer.
    Mark Berninghausen
    The answers are the end. The questions are the journey. Journey on.



  12. #12
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    Default Re: Asian honey on US shelves

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    Are other commodoities accounted for in this manner? Number of cattle, chickens, etc. unsold at year end? Almost seems to imply that something is unsold at year end because the seller couldn't find a buyer.
    Looking at beef reports I don't see any stats for unsold goods, but honey is a little unique I think. If the market for cattle isn't there the rancher/farmer just doesn't ship as much... there really is no way to measure the difference between what stock he held back because of market price and what he held back to propagate the next generation.

    Milk has to be shipped regardless of market price, having grown up on a dairy farm in Vermont, if the market drops we reduce production by shipping the older cows for beef and milking fewer head.

    Honey on the other hand stores well, so unsold product can be withheld from the market.
    Always question Conventional Wisdom.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Asian honey on US shelves

    Quite true 'blue. But wouldn't you agree that Honey is somewhat similar to Cattle in regards to not shipping if the mkt isn't there?
    Mark Berninghausen
    The answers are the end. The questions are the journey. Journey on.



  14. #14
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    Default Re: Asian honey on US shelves

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    Quite true 'blue. But wouldn't you agree that Honey is somewhat similar to Cattle in regards to not shipping if the mkt isn't there?
    Not really because a live cow still has value for the farmer in calving.. A jar of honey is valueless as long as it is unsold.
    Always question Conventional Wisdom.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Asian honey on US shelves

    This is getting a bit off topic but since the OP took it there....8-)
    We consider honey in the warehouse the same as money in the bank. We just don't know what the ultimate $ value will be. Unlike many commodities, honey has no formal future's market.
    We speculate every harvest on when to sell, but precedent on the previous year is a big determinant as well.
    If we were to sell two harvests in one year the lower proportional expenses for the year against higher income would result in higher taxes and the expenses in the next year would be wasted.........
    Sheri
    PS most beef cattle are not calfing prior to being sent to market, they are being fed for slaughter. If not sold, they must still be fed, so they are worse than honey in that more expense is needed to maintain them.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Asian honey on US shelves

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnK and Sheri View Post
    PS most beef cattle are not calfing prior to being sent to market, they are being fed for slaughter. If not sold, they must still be fed, so they are worse than honey in that more expense is needed to maintain them.
    Beef is sold in stages... The first being feeder calves which are the beginning of the crop for the following season. Once feeders are sold they are sent to feedlots and become hamburg for consumption, but prior to that stage they can be turned back loose to produce the calves for the next year instead of the beef. This is the stage I was referring to. I agree, post feedlot they become burger regardless of the market.

    Returning back to honey. I am guessing that the USDA isn't collecting data on the small guy anyway, their data is being collected on the guys who sell wholesale and by the barrel.
    Always question Conventional Wisdom.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Asian honey on US shelves

    Quote Originally Posted by bluegrass View Post
    Not really because a live cow still has value for the farmer in calving.. A jar of honey is valueless as long as it is unsold.
    Hmmm, just like a bar of Gold? If a jar or barrel of honey is valueless, how is a cow or the potential calf not also? I guess I can see how a cow, who may calve, may have more value than a jar of honey, but a barrel of honey?
    Mark Berninghausen
    The answers are the end. The questions are the journey. Journey on.



  18. #18
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    Default Re: Asian honey on US shelves

    Quote Originally Posted by bluegrass View Post
    the USDA isn't collecting data on the small guy anyway, their data is being collected on the guys who sell wholesale and by the barrel.
    I'm not sure about that either. They send me a form and call me. I run about 500 cols and bottle for sale about 28,000 lbs of Honey annually, in jars by direct store delivery.

    I think some friends of mine w/ less than 50 cols get surveyed too. Not sure.

    You could be right tho.
    Mark Berninghausen
    The answers are the end. The questions are the journey. Journey on.



  19. #19
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    Default Re: Asian honey on US shelves

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    Hmmm, just like a bar of Gold? If a jar or barrel of honey is valueless, how is a cow or the potential calf not also? I guess I can see how a cow, who may calve, may have more value than a jar of honey, but a barrel of honey?
    Think of it this way... A nuc has value to you if you sell it or keep it to start a new hive, just like a calf has value to the farmer sold or kept. A jar of honey you can sell, (value) or store (cost).
    Always question Conventional Wisdom.

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