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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Bardstown, KY, USA
    Posts
    321

    Default Re: Making my own boxes

    Quote Originally Posted by waynesgarden View Post
    Look at the other plans there also if you are really interested in saving money. Covers are easy to make and making screened bottom boards, while requiring a couple of dado setups, can save a ton of money.


    Wayne
    Where do you get the screen for the screen bottom boards? A little information in this area would be greatly appreciated!!!
    I believe I can make a screened bottom board with a single 2x4 8' long and a little more. They normally sell for $25 in our area.

    Thank you!!
    Phil
    Grandchildren are the best.... Bees a close second....

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Nacogdoches,TX,USA
    Posts
    76

    Default Re: Making my own boxes

    I make my own boxes using rabbit joints on ends that way chop saw to length rip to width all boards then rabbit end boards one rabbit on top for frame rest and rabbits down sides only two changes of dado stack
    use tite bond III and screws one 12' board makes 2 boxes can make mediums for about $4.00

    Dave

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Salem, Oregon
    Posts
    460

    Default Re: Making my own boxes

    Get number 8 hardware cloth. I had ACE Hardware here in Salem order me a whole roll in the width I wanted. They sell it by the foot in another width that was harder for me to work with.

    Not all of the ACE stores carry it, so if one doesn't have it, check with another one.

    Pugs

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Springfield, Missouri, USA
    Posts
    76

    Default Re: Making my own boxes

    Wow "new ky beekeeper" sounds like you are going to have a fun little project

    I have been building some deeps with finger joints plus i finally figured out how to make walter t kelly handles and am going to be moving on to inner covers, telescoping lids, bottoms,etc.

    Question for you sir... the wood that you cut is oak? so that means that your hive body's will be oak? That sound very interesting.

    Please tell me how the bee's accept the oak boxes. I would love to make some bee boxes out of oak lumber. That sounds like a lot of fun

    Have fun and bee careful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Chippew County, WI, USA
    Posts
    651

    Default Re: Making my own boxes

    Really, dont cut any fingers off. Be really careful with your thumbs. These are more important than your fingers. Wear saftly glasses. Eyes are important too. You need all of these things to work bees. I just had to joke around but it is serious. Its important to never be in a hurry. I almost cut my thumb off trying to get one more thing done really quick before I quit for the day, not worth it. It really, really sucked. Now my thumb is half numb but at least it works pretty well. I would have been really mad if I could not grab a frame any more.

    I never quit making my own stuff and I was back at it before my thumb was healed all the way. I never hurry and I alway take the time to do things safely. Always put your safety first, productivity second.

    Enjoy. Building your own equipment is almost as fun as the bees.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Algoma dr. Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    561

    Default Re: Making my own boxes

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave360 View Post
    I make my own boxes using rabbit joints on ends that way chop saw to length rip to width all boards then rabbit end boards one rabbit on top for frame rest and rabbits down sides only two changes of dado stack
    use tite bond III and screws one 12' board makes 2 boxes can make mediums for about $4.00

    Dave
    I picked up 60 lineal ft. of 1 x 10 white pine yesterday - $42.00 ;will give me 10 deep boxes so I agree with your price. (glue and screws extra) The material is rough sawn but quite uniform at 1".

    I shimmed my dado stack out to 1" and set it for 3/8 protrusion then I only need move the fence to cut the two different dimensions of rabbit on the box ends.

    I can also leave the dado blade set the same 1" width and make 1"fingers up till the top 5/8" partial which acommodates the frame ledge. No change for either 6 5/8" or 9 5/8 boxes.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Danbury, CT
    Posts
    2,863

    Default Re: Making my own boxes

    Quote Originally Posted by New Ky Beekeeper View Post
    Why not popular?
    Because it twists and warps and breaks the joints out of the boxes. Poplar has to be some what green when used for boxing on barns, but because of the shrinking issues it has to be completely dry for building hive boxes. It is hard to work when dry and when re-exposed to the weather, it twists.



    Quote Originally Posted by New Ky Beekeeper View Post
    Where do you get the screen for the screen bottom boards? A little information in this area would be greatly appreciated!!!

    Thank you!!
    Phil
    If you can't find it local you can get it at Chevy Chase hardware in Lexington. That was the only place in the area I could find it, Home depot, Lowes, Ace and Do-it best didn't carry #8 hardware cloth. If you have any old mom and pop hardware places near you, that is where I would look.
    Always question Conventional Wisdom.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,545

    Default Re: Making my own boxes

    Quote Originally Posted by New Ky Beekeeper View Post
    Where do you get the screen for the screen bottom boards?
    I believe I can make a screened bottom board with a single 2x4 8' long and a little more. Phil
    I get #8 wire @ ACE

    It takes 5ft 2x4 to make a bottom board so buy a 10 footer and make 2
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

  9. #29
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Algoma dr. Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    561

    Default Re: Making my own boxes

    Why not poplar?

    There is a big difference in commonly called yellow poplar or tulip poplar, and cottonwood, white poplar, aspen etc. Entirely different wood. Up in the north we dont get the trees the southerners call poplar. I hear it can be quite good wood but our local trees we call poplar would be be my last choice for reasons of decay in moist conditions, warping and shrinkage and need to predrill and countersink every screw or nail unless assembled dripping green and wet. Apples and oranges (or lemons) lol!

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Jonesborough,Tennessee
    Posts
    185

    Default Re: Making my own boxes

    A lot of the old homestead houses in the mountains of Virginia, where I grew up were sided with Yellow Poplar singles.

    All the good burley tobacco sticks were made from yellow poplar.

    We have some down in the barn at my home place that are over 100 years old and they will still do what they were designed to do.

    Now they are just used for walking sticks and to run cows out of the yard when the varmints get through the wire.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Springfield, Missouri, USA
    Posts
    76

    Default Re: Making my own boxes

    I picked up 60 lineal ft. of 1 x 10 white pine yesterday - $42.00 ;will give me 10 deep boxes
    When i have built me deeps i had to go to 1x12's due to the 1x10 were really shorter than what a deep is suppose to be.

    When they say 1x10..that means it was 1 inch by 10 inch when the MILL cut the wood.

    Not after it has shrunk down and cured.

    But if you have been building deeps out of this material some how please tell me how you did it

    Buzzy Bee

    P.s. Why don't they make hive bodys based on the size of the wood? I have to wast a lot of wood from a 1x12 cutting it to size because the 1x10 were just barely to short

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Stillwell, KS
    Posts
    546

    Default Re: Making my own boxes

    Quote Originally Posted by New Ky Beekeeper View Post
    .... I have red and white oak.
    I make all my own beehive woodenware and am a sideline custom woodworker.

    The techniques and jigs you use for softwoods don't always work as well with hardwoods.

    For instance:

    - you’re going to have to pre-drill and use screws on joints anywhere you would otherwise nail, like box corners
    - when cutting finger joints with a tablesaw and dado set, the box side pieces tend to ride up more and tear out worse requiring you to make multiple passes
    - you have to be more precise cutting your joints with hardwoods because your not going to be able to just pound them together without the wood splitting and tearing
    - cutting inset hive handles requires multiple passes with hardwoods
    - slightly warped hardwood boards tend to split when you force them flat at the joints



    This is a guestimate on my part, but basically hardwoods I've found roughly double my labor.

    Course you end up with very sturdy equipment that doesn't ever blow over because it weighs a ton.


    Don't forget to wear a dust mask

    Don

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Manning, SC
    Posts
    1,776

    Default Re: Making my own boxes

    Avoid making hives out of poplar...[/QUOTE]

    Why?

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Athens, OH
    Posts
    2,539

    Default Re: Making my own boxes

    I've been building houses here in SE Ohio for 35 years. Could not disagree more with avoiding poplar. Painted poplar is the preferred untreated outdoor wood locally available here. It works easily and is much lighter, more stable and cheaper than oak. It holds paint well. I've built all my equipment from it. I can get it kiln dried from local sawmill.
    Is it solipsistic in here, or is it just me?

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Athens, OH
    Posts
    2,539

    Default Re: Making my own boxes

    Quote Originally Posted by D Semple View Post
    I make all my own beehive woodenware and am a sideline custom woodworker.

    The techniques and jigs you use for softwoods don't always work as well with hardwoods.
    Another arguement for poplar. BTW, Don, nice equipment. Cedar boxes and oak frames?
    Is it solipsistic in here, or is it just me?

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Danbury, CT
    Posts
    2,863

    Default Re: Making my own boxes

    Quote Originally Posted by cg3 View Post
    I've been building houses here in SE Ohio for 35 years. Could not disagree more with avoiding poplar. Painted poplar is the preferred untreated outdoor wood locally available here. It works easily and is much lighter, more stable and cheaper than oak. It holds paint well. I've built all my equipment from it. I can get it kiln dried from local sawmill.
    And that is the difference from what we are talking about here. I had problems with it warping and breaking the box joints when I used it, the wood was some I had milled my self so I was very careful about how I sawed the grain. They didn't even last a single season and I burned them because they were unserviceable.

    http://www.extension.purdue.edu/extm.../FNR-410-W.pdf
    Last edited by bluegrass; 08-23-2011 at 10:20 AM.
    Always question Conventional Wisdom.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,545

    Default Re: Making my own boxes

    P.s. Why don't they make hive bodys based on the size of the wood? I have to wast a lot of wood from a 1x12 cutting it to size because the 1x10 were just barely to short
    They did but that was when a 1x10 was 9 5/8" wide now 9 1/4" I use the rips from 1x12 for the edges of innercovers
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Stillwell, KS
    Posts
    546

    Default Re: Making my own boxes

    Quote Originally Posted by cg3 View Post
    Another arguement for poplar. BTW, Don, nice equipment. Cedar boxes and oak frames?
    Thanks, both boxes and frames are walnut, I put up and dry my own lumber and had a bunch not suitable for furniture and ended up making 5 hives with it.

    I found it too labor intensive though to use hardwoods and have switched to using dimensional pine.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,716

    Default Re: Making my own boxes

    I've built my own boxes for years now. I'm glad I did. I can usually make at least two boxes for the price of buying one, not including shipping (which is free from Mann Lake if it's over $100). I even tried to cut up some old free pallets and use those, but it didn't work out so well. Much of that wood is too old and deteriorated (at least the ones I can get for free). It takes so much time cutting the wood, working it, gluing them together, and trimming them, all to end up with maybe two or three sides of a box per pallet.

    I also make my own screened bottom boards (now those are great to get out of pallets), and migratory tops. I doubt I'll start making my own inner covers though, I just love the ones from Brushy Mountain (super sturdy), although I might make my own ventilated covers soon.

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Bardstown, KY, USA
    Posts
    321

    Default Re: Making my own boxes

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    I do make my own equipment. I've made all the plans available for free, though I still see 'leeches' putting those plans on CD and selling them.

    http://www.beesource.com/build-it-yourself/
    .
    Nice plans!
    Grandchildren are the best.... Bees a close second....

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