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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    1,973

    Default End of the drone brood - should mites be concentrated?

    Hey there,

    Going through the hives today, I can see that the queen has ceased production of drones, and there are not many remaining in their cells. There are only a smattering of capped drone cells throughout the hives.

    My question:

    In the last couple of weeks of drone production in the hives, will the mites become concentrated within these few remaining cells? Should I expect to find spiking varroa counts in scratched brood comb at this point in the season?

    Thanks,

    Adam

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Perry, Florida, USA
    Posts
    226

    Default Re: End of the drone brood - should mites be concentrated?

    I dont know the answer but will be watching to see if someone else has experience with this. I pulled some burr comb the other day and it was all drone comb so I pulled all the drones out and they were full of mites at various stages. I am just waiting for a seven day stretch of temp drops to give them all a formic acid treatment.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    1,973

    Default Re: End of the drone brood - should mites be concentrated?

    I pulled drone larvae from a number of places throughout two hives and didn't find a single mite. I'd just like to know if this is an indicator that my mite levels are low.

    Adam

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    26,276

    Default Re: End of the drone brood - should mites be concentrated?

    How about before? Very many mites?
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Williston, NC, USA
    Posts
    1,779

    Default Re: End of the drone brood - should mites be concentrated?

    Mites levels increase going into the autumn as brood numbers decrease. Mites present or absent from drone brood is only a partial picture and doesn't give you a true assessment. Scratching drone cells and checking for varroa is one way of doing it, but not enough. A 48-hr drop count will give you the true picture.

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