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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    cincinnati, ohio
    Posts
    62

    Default Honey extractor type

    I am going to buy a hand-crank honey extractor. I have just six hives, so a small one is fine for me. I am trying to decide whether to get a tangential or radial design. I realize a radial design is more convenient to use because both sides are extracted at the same time, but does it get as much honey out of frames as a tangential model where each side is extracted separately?

    Thanks, Jim

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Phelps Co. Missouri USA
    Posts
    856

    Default Re: Honey extractor type

    Yes, a radial get it out much better than a tangential extractor, also less messy.

    I have never heard of any one going from a radial to a tangential extractor !!

    PCM

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    OKC, OK USA
    Posts
    2,869

    Default Re: Honey extractor type

    Mine will do them both ways and sometimes if I have thick honey I will sling them Tangentially to get more out.
    Mike Forbes
    Red Dirt Apiaries

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    1,858

    Default Re: Honey extractor type

    Think long-term, or at least, longer-term. I used a hand-crank, two-frame, tangential and it drained too slow. Found a deal on a four-frame, hand-crank tangential so I used one while the other was draining. When I hit sixty hives I was tearing up my shoulder cranking the extractors.

    That's when I bought motorized, twenty-frame radial. The motor gently spins out the honey while you uncap more frames. So while twenty frames are spinning, I have time to uncap another twenty. I cannot tell the difference between the amount of honey left in the frame. But then I bring my honey home in the late afternoon and spin it out right after dinner. You can feel the residual heat coming off the comb. Warm honey spins better than room temperature...although with our current temperatures it doesn't make any difference.

    I wished I had bought a motorized in the early days. Even with six hives, you can uncap while the extractor spins. I would think seriously about investing the money in a motorized unit. If you need to move up to a larger extractor, the motorized unit will command a higher resale price than a hand-crank. There are millions of two- and four-frame, hand-crank extractors on the market. You can pick one up real cheap, but in the long run, I think you'll be happier with a motorized unit.

    Grant
    Jackson, MO
    Beekeeping With Twenty-five Hives: https://www.createspace.com/4152725

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Brown County, IN
    Posts
    2,025

    Default Re: Honey extractor type

    Quote Originally Posted by NasalSponge View Post
    Mine will do them both ways and sometimes if I have thick honey I will sling them Tangentially to get more out.
    Ditto. I bought a Maxant 3100H (handcrank) this year and did some frames tangentially because they still felt a bit heavy after spinning them radially. The 3100H is made so that I can easily add a motor to it in the future

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camas, WA
    Posts
    1,859

    Default Re: Honey extractor type

    Quote Originally Posted by PCM View Post
    Yes, a radial get it out much better than a tangential extractor, also less messy.



    PCM
    That statement is not true. I have both, a 4 frame tangential hand crank and an 18 frame motorized one. The tangential is messier as you have to turn the frames but I think that it comes out faster. My radial is motorized so I don't care but I run it for 10-15 minutes while I crank a couple of minutes on each side of the tangential and get the same amount of honey out.

    The statement about thick honey is also true, I think. The tangential get thick honey out easier than the radial.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Galt, CA
    Posts
    879

    Default Re: Honey extractor type

    No matter what you decide, I will offer my advice from past experience.

    - BUY A QUALITY MACHINE!
    - Maxant or Dadant should be the 2 names at the top of your list. I bought one from Mann Lake and hated it. Also, buying one a little bigger than what you think you need is money well spent too.

    Have you extracted honey before? If not, rent a hand crank extractor and see what you think. I did not have the money my first year to buy an extractor, so I rented one and discovered that I DID NOT want a hand cranker. If you do end up buying a hand cranker, try and get one that is upgradeable for the future.

    Good luck,
    C2

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    8,450

    Default Re: Honey extractor type

    The difference between radial and tangential is time so if the extractor is motorized then you can just let it run longer to get all the honey out. A disadvantage of the tangential extractor is it creates a force that is perpendicular to the frame and as a result will tend to blow out the comb. If you are using natural comb I would not get a tangential extractor or use one in that mode.

    If I bought a crank extractor I wouldn't use the crank I would use a battery operated drill at the very least to drive it.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sullivan, MO
    Posts
    827

    Default Re: Honey extractor type

    I have a maxant 3100H and either I was doing something wrong when i was using radially or it's something to do with foundationless. I was blowing frames all to heck when I was spinning them radially. When I switched to tangentally they rested up against the cage and I didn't have any blowouts and the honey came out a heck of a lot fast.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Barry, TX USA
    Posts
    861

    Default Re: Honey extractor type

    I've seen comb get torn up in a radial extractor but I think it's a little harder to accomplish. There's no reason why you cannot safely extract even natural comb with either type of extractor. The radial will be easier because you insert frames and spin. The tangential is more work because you lightly extract your first side a little than flip the frames and extract the other side completely, then flip again and completely extract the first side. You can even add a round of light spins on each side to make it safer for the comb. The tangential will be much more work, flipping the frames.

    It comes down to what you want, what you can afford and how big you intend to get. If you know you'll be growing past the number of hives to justify the big motorized radial, or are already there, and can afford it, by all means get it. If you're relatively new to beekeeping, not sure how much you will grow and/or have limited funds, that small, hand crank, tangential extractor probably suits you well. There are times when even though you have the large number of hives and that big motorized radial extractor when you might want to extract a small number of frames and the small hand crank works fine for that situation.

    If you're new and not sure you'll be a beekeeper 10 years from now that big extractor might be a bit of a loss for you because I doubt you're going to sell it for what you have in it. If you can get by with inexpensive used 2 or 4 frame extractor, there are many of them available at a low price. You can upgrade and sell your used little extractor for close to what you have in it.
    When you stop learning you're dead.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Redding, CA
    Posts
    38

    Default Re: Honey extractor type

    Batman says: "I bought one from Mann Lake and hated it."

    I am considering buying an Mann Lake motorized extractor and I was wondering what type of problems you've experienced with their product. What size was yours and was it a motorized or crank unit?
    Last edited by lcl; 07-29-2011 at 04:03 PM. Reason: Missing Quote

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    8,450

    Default Re: Honey extractor type

    Buying used has to do with your ability to maintain machinery. If you cannot fix things then buy new.
    If you started off full speed on a tangential extractor you have the full weight of the honey on the other side of the comb trying to destroy the comb. So those that are combos you would reduce the amount of honey in the comb using the radial mode and then switch to tangential. If it is variable speed you can draw some out in the tangential mode at a lower speed on both sides before you go full speed. With a radial you start off slow and then just let it run at a higher speed. All the honey will come out but it takes time for the inner section of the comb to draw out because it has less centrifugal force at the smaller dia. That being said if you were going with a crank only then I would go with a tangential. However, I am lazy and I would never put up with a crank. Starting a tractor maybe, but turning butter, ice cream or extracting honey, never.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Macoupin,Illinois,USA
    Posts
    351

    Default Re: Honey extractor type

    if you buy the right one the hand crank can be replaced with your trusty ol craftsman half inch drill,you won't be the first to try and it works great,but i like radial over tang

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Galt, CA
    Posts
    879

    Default Re: Honey extractor type

    I bought a motorized 18/9 radial (18 small or medium frames, 9 deep). No mater what we did, we couldn't get the thing balanced and constantly blew comb at the slowest speed, we couldn't get it to spin any slower than what we were doing it at and still blew out frames. When I started talking to people here on, they had told me my first mistake was not buying a Dadant or Maxant. I'll tell you what, at first I though "is there really that much of a difference?". After pullin the trigger on the Dadant, I will tell anyone "yes, there is that much of a difference." The quality and the feel is way better on the Dadant machine and I hear the Maxants awesome as well. I wished I had just spent the extra $ last year instead of buying something twice trying to save some cash. Because in the end I cost me in more money in loss of built comb and buying a the 2nd machine.

    C2

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Mims Florida
    Posts
    124

    Default Re: Honey extractor type

    I got the Maxant 3/6/9 frame extractor and I love it.
    A vet is someone at some time in there life signed a blank check to the people of America that included there life.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    dadeville, alabama, USA
    Posts
    1,163

    Default Re: Honey extractor type

    You are a beekeeper. So you want to spend your money ONCE, spend it WELL, and spend it WISELY! With the price of honey up, with local demand out of sight, now would be a good time to invest in processing equipment. Nickel plated stainless does not loose its value. It will only increase!!! As stated above, if you intend to grow, then buy something that you will grow into. Thus prevent spending money twice for the same purpose. TED

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Galt, CA
    Posts
    879

    Default Re: Honey extractor type

    Ted, well said and exactly my point, you try and take the easy (cheap) way out, and it will cost ya. Do it right, research it and buy it only once.

    C2

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Oregon City, Oregon
    Posts
    981

    Default Re: Honey extractor type

    Quote Originally Posted by Acebird View Post
    A disadvantage of the tangential extractor is it creates a force that is perpendicular to the frame and as a result will tend to blow out the comb.
    100pct agree plus with a tangential you'll spend all your time flipping frames back and forth and not uncapping the next batch of frames... If you haven't used one before you extract 50pct of one side then flip the frame around and extract 100pct of other side then flip them again and do remaining 50pct........Pain in the keester........
    Honeydew

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    8,450

    Default Re: Honey extractor type

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Kretschmann View Post
    Nickel plated stainless does not loose its value. TED
    This can't be right. Who in their right mind would nickel plate stainless. I don't know one manufacturer from another but I would not use nickel plate in an environment of honey. If the steel is carbon I would want the surface powder coated or some form of epoxy. I know galvanized is used quite a bit but I think that is the cheap way out also.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Great Falls Montana
    Posts
    3,488

    Default Re: Honey extractor type

    Most problems with hand crank extractors or powered one are caused by the crank operating them. When I was inexperienced at putting together frames and foundation, Shaazamm! I had trouble extracting. Until I learned that frames need to be warm before extracting, I had problems. Until my early poor workmanship got all blown up, I had problems with my first powered extractor blowing frames up! Of course with the powered one, the frame blowing out likes company and takes three or four with it! It is all part of a learning curve. Just be patient and go slow whatever you are using. That said, if you are in your first couple of year, hire your extracting done. If you decide you are going to keep bees, you will almost inevitably suffer from Colony Creep. You will end up with more colonies than you initially planned so buy bigger than you need. It will always make the job easier and it only costs a little more to go first class.

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