Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 30 of 30
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    9,853

    Default Re: Storing capped honey frames?

    When you speak of moisture transfer you must also speak of temperature. Something that may be causing confusion is moisture content vs. relative humidity. Secondly, wax is not hydroscopic. With cool temps in the winter and a wax coating not much moisture is going to transfer either way from the honey.

    What I don't understand is why uncapped honey frames crystallize in a refrigerator. If honey crystallizes at 57 deg. I would think 45 deg is far enough away from that point. And a frost free refrigerator is taking the moisture out.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    27,755

    Default Re: Storing capped honey frames?

    Why do you have uncapped honey in your refrigerator?

    Eventually almost all honeys will crystalize, no matter what temperature it is stored at. Unless one stores honey at high enuf temp as to liquify crystals. Which I would not call storing. Cooler or hotter than 57 degrees slows the process. It doesn't stop it.
    Mark Berninghausen To combat Ebola, please consider supporting http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org


  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camas, WA
    Posts
    1,958

    Default Re: Storing capped honey frames?

    It crystallizes fastest at 57. It will also crystallize at 90 (much slower, but in my refrigerator warmer you can see it start over a year) or near freezing. At room temperature our honey that is extracted about the first of August will crystallize by the first of November. When I put honey in my freezer (close to 0F) it comes out just like it went in, but will start to crystallize after that.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    9,853

    Default Re: Storing capped honey frames?

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    Why do you have uncapped honey in your refrigerator?
    New beek, didn't know any better. Not all the honey came out of the comb when I drip extracted. That is why I made an extractor. At the time I felt the frames could be used as a feed in the spring which I did and I think it helped. It certainly gets the bees using the frames right away as opposed to fresh foundation.

    I am still leaning on the fence because I am not 100% sure what to do this year. Maybe I should start a new post and ask?
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    378

    Default Re: Storing capped honey frames?

    Quote Originally Posted by Peaches View Post
    Do you have hive beetles up there in Wisconsin?
    Fortunately our recent, wickedly cold Winters have kept us SHB free. I talked to a migratory beekeeper who was battling them and I don't envy him for that.

    We do have wax moths though, which has me hunting for freezers on Craigslist.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Oldham Co, KY
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Storing capped honey frames?

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldbee View Post
    >"The reason I posted this was I was told honey will still draw moisture even if it was capped."

    >"No, not true." --sqkcrk.

    I would agree with that. Honey for winter stores is usually stored at the top of the hive above cluster. We all know how much moisture the bees can produce in the hive during winter; even a well ventilated hive. If the capped honey absorbed moisture over 3-5 months of winter, some of it might ferment. The bees go through a lot of work to reduce the moisture of nectar. If it were to ferment, why bother capping it anyway?

    I had two supers kept indoors that I was unable to extract until the following spring; it seemed fine to me.
    I had a similar experience. I stored honey for several weeks before extracting with no problems. I don't understand why these eggs would immediately hatch and ruin honey if not in the hive and in the hive they last all winter.
    Last edited by KYBEEs; 08-27-2014 at 01:01 PM.
    _____________________________________
    Keeping since 2008 | 2 Hives | USDA Zone 6a

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Garland, Bladen County, NC, USA
    Posts
    3,080

    Default Re: Storing capped honey frames?

    Quote Originally Posted by KYBEEs View Post
    I had a similar experience. I stored honey for several weeks before extracting with no problems. I don't understand why these eggs woudl immediatly hatch and ruin honey if not in the hive and in the hive they last all winter.
    Humidity... below 25% they do not hatch.
    “Don’t tell me how educated you are, tell me how much you have travelled.” - The Quran

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Oldham Co, KY
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Storing capped honey frames?

    Quote Originally Posted by hpm08161947 View Post
    Humidity... below 25% they do not hatch.
    That's really interesting. So do bees keep humidity low in the summer time too? I can understand keeping the temperature low by air movement but I wouldn't have thought that would affect humidity. I go back and forth between being amazed by bees and wanting to sell everything and be done with them. I'm in an amazed sort of mood now.
    _____________________________________
    Keeping since 2008 | 2 Hives | USDA Zone 6a

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Oldham Co, KY
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Storing capped honey frames?

    Quote Originally Posted by geebob View Post
    Fortunately our recent, wickedly cold Winters have kept us SHB free. I talked to a migratory beekeeper who was battling them and I don't envy him for that.

    We do have wax moths though, which has me hunting for freezers on Craigslist.
    So should I keep all of my frames and supers in a freezer? Does the freezer need to be one? What if some boxes already have some moths in them?
    _____________________________________
    Keeping since 2008 | 2 Hives | USDA Zone 6a

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Garland, Bladen County, NC, USA
    Posts
    3,080

    Default Re: Storing capped honey frames?

    Quote Originally Posted by KYBEEs View Post
    That's really interesting. So do bees keep humidity low in the summer time too?
    I don't know. I just know that in this land of high humidity if you do not keep the dehumidifier going full blast in the honey house you will wind up with a mess....
    “Don’t tell me how educated you are, tell me how much you have travelled.” - The Quran

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads