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Thread: Cordovan Color

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    hamilton city, new zealand
    Posts
    172

    Default Cordovan Color

    Is it true that cordovan color was only seen in italian bees? Was it developed by humans or naturally occuring color variation?

    Anyone knows where and when it was recorded first?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    28,028

    Default Re: Cordovan Color

    I believe it occurs naturally in Nature. I don't know how it could be developed if it didn't exist naturally. Maybe some have produced more than occur naturally, that I don't know.

    My first experience w/ a Cordovan Queen was when I was Inspecting Colonies in Holmes County,Ohio, amongst the Amish who live there, in 1985. This one hive had a Queen that was so much like a bright version of the shoe polish color that I was asstounded and wondered how it could be that color. She was so different in color from her daughters and sons that one couldn't not see her if she was on the frame. She was amazingly beautiful and in great shape.

    I hope the Sunkist Cordovan that I got from Russell Apiaries will blow me away in the same way. She didn't strike me that way in the cage.

    What traits do Cordovans carry? Other than color, is there anything especially beneficial or detrimental about them?
    Mark Berninghausen
    Squeak Creek Apiaries



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,408

    Default Re: Cordovan Color

    The Cordovan trait, as far as I know, has no traits "linked" to it, so hypothetically it is possible for any honey bee to have the Cordovan color trait bred into them and still have every other genetic trait intact, but now their color is influenced by the Cordovan color trait.

    Most commonly Apis mellifera ligustica, also known as the Italian race of honey bee is the bee that has had the Cordovan trait bred into it more often, or strains of honey bee derived from the Italian subspecies, because the trait has a more dramatic effect on the coloration of the Italian subspecies. Though it can be bred into any race/strain of honey bee.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    hamilton city, new zealand
    Posts
    172

    Default Re: Cordovan Color

    Any Idea where it was first observed?

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