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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Australia, NSW
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    112

    Default Instead of a cone method removal, would a hose running into a hive work as a trap?

    SOrry wrong forum, moved, how do I delete?
    Last edited by 100 td; 06-21-2011 at 12:33 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Cross County, Arkansas, USA
    Posts
    41

    Default Re: Instead of a cone method removal, would a hose running into a hive work as a trap

    I made one of these: http://kelleybees.com/CMS/CMSPage.as...=21776|Product
    Even with this I had to put a wire cone in the tunnel, if not the bees were entering the hive and going through the tunnel back into the wall. I think the use of anything solid
    doesn't work well because the bees can see the hole, with the wire it is hard for them to see the hole

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Australia, NSW
    Posts
    112

    Default Re: Instead of a cone method removal, would a hose running into a hive work as a trap

    So what is that, a nuc box with an entrance?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Cross County, Arkansas, USA
    Posts
    41

    Default Re: Instead of a cone method removal, would a hose running into a hive work as a trap

    The one I made was a 5 frame nuc. I made a small long box out of plywood then, cut a square hole in another peice of plywood then glued and nailed them together. Then cut a hole in the nuc so that the tunnel is a tight fit. Use silicone to glue plywood over hole in wall or tree, slide nuc in place. Let bees come and go for a couple of days then put a wire cone in the tunnel. When there iis enough bees in the box I give them a frame of brood. The last trap out I did using this I had to put the second nuc on top of the first one.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Australia, NSW
    Posts
    112

    Default Re: Instead of a cone method removal, would a hose running into a hive work as a trap

    In my original post(now deleted?) I asked some more questions.
    If using a hose into a hive (a dark one), would the bees eventually start building in the hive after having to travel thru it continously?(without brood or comb from other hives)
    Would the queen eventually move out the pipe and lay in the hive?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Cross County, Arkansas, USA
    Posts
    41

    Default Re: Instead of a cone method removal, would a hose running into a hive work as a trap

    From the trapouts that I have done if the bees can get back into their hive they do not build any thing in the trap out hive. If the queen has plenty of room to lay in her hive she has no reason to come out through the hose. I think the main reason trap outs work is because you let the works and drones out and when they can not get back in there is not resources coming into the hive and they send mpore workers out. The hive acts like there is a darth .

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Tulsa OK. USA
    Posts
    846

    Default Re: Instead of a cone method removal, would a hose running into a hive work as a trap

    basser59 is right, when the field bees fail to return and no polen or necture coming in the queen stops laying. Each day more bees go out to forage or orintation flights and fail to return, the queen and house bees begin to consume the stores in the hive and the brood hatches out and over time the hive population dwindles until the queen and remaining bees leave to find a new home. 90% of the time they fly right on past the hive box as it has a queen it raised from the frame of eggs/brood the you installed at the start or a queen that you installed.
    IF the bees find any way to return to the hive a trapout will not work. Jim
    Stop and smell the flowers, 50,000 ladies can't be wrong
    Bsweetapiary@aol.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Rhinebeck, NY
    Posts
    74

    Default Re: Instead of a cone method removal, would a hose running into a hive work as a trap

    Adding to the discussion, regarding the "walk through" questions, that is exactly what I did when I first started trying to do a trap-out -- a swarm had adopted my old plywood utility trailer box. As I have learned since, the go-thru method uses the trap box as "extended hive space" and it requires a lot more management. With the one-way cone, they simply cannot get back into the old 'hive' and adopt the new space.

    The primary ongoing management after setting up and sealing the edges of the big side of the screen cone is to 1) make sure there are no additional entrances that can be adopted as the new primary entrance, 2) make sure that the angle is set so dead bees don't block the skinny end of the screen cone -- and be careful not to have too long of a tunnel where traffic jams can occur. 3) swap a frame for one with fresh eggs after enough bees have moved in to keep the eggs and hatched brood warm. 4) If you are starting with a nuc or smaller box, monitor the space -- it's a pain to have to do a swap like I did recently changing a nuc to a full-depth body, 15' up a tree, just because I started with too small a box due to a shortage of woodware.

    Once you get to this stage, fewer 'management' trips should be required.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Australia, NSW
    Posts
    112

    Question Re: Instead of a cone method removal, would a hose running into a hive work as a trap

    The original reason I asked is that I don't have bees yet. Winter here downunder. I have been told about a couple of different hives in trees but I don't think they are easy to get to, so I thought maybe I can "Make them" walk thru an empty hive to get in and out of their home. Hoping after a few weeks they may start building in the empty hive.
    Then if they did, put a srceen cone on the end of the hose so they would all come out into the new hive space.
    Hoping the queen would eventually be running out of food like the rest and come and find the new hive
    Hoping the queen gets out and finds the new hive and says this is alright and starts laying.
    I know I'm asking for a lot, but if you don't ask the question you will never know if it's possible

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Rhinebeck, NY
    Posts
    74

    Default Re: Instead of a cone method removal, would a hose running into a hive work as a trap

    To re-phrase... "You must create a population shortage in the primary colony."

    Look at my post #8 -- you can't wait for them to simply migrate. Think of the brood nest (heart of the colony) as a component in a continuous cycle... queen lays eggs... bees raise brood... bees cap brood... when the new bees hatch out, bees clean cells... queen lays eggs... etc. It is a balancing act. No matter how patient you are they are not likely to just migrate the colony into your auxilliary box on their own.

    I have learned that re-inventing a proven process just isn't worth the time.

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