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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Knoxville, TN, USA
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: oil of wintergreen

    We were looking for just this kind of information. Are there any suggestions on where to buy the oils - reputable and safe for the bees?

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Keno, OR
    Posts
    734

    Default Re: oil of wintergreen

    Klamath Basin Beekeepers Association: www.klamathbeekeepers.org
    Facebook: www.facebook.com/groups/kbbafb/

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Glencoe, Okla USA
    Posts
    305

    Default Re: oil of wintergreen

    It looks like this is the place to submit this post:
    Wintergreen treatment:
    1 cc Wintergreen
    1 Cup Honey - warm water to finish 1 quart
    mix and feed 1 time in September

    Should vinegar be included in this mix?

    Has this recipe been tried?
    Myron Denny
    Glencoe Okla

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
    Posts
    829

    Default Re: oil of wintergreen

    Quote Originally Posted by dmpower View Post
    You can also add wintergreen to sugar/grease patties for varroa and tracheal mites as well as in the feed. Don't use any of the essential oils in the hive if you have honey supers on.
    I use natural Thymol in strips as a mite treatment for many years. IMO it is the best and easiest way to treat against Varroa and tracheal mites. When I use Thymol (even during honey flow) I never ever had any problems with a taste in my honey.
    Even if this would be happen, I'm not worried about it. Check the internet, there are several areas in the world where they have thyme fields and PURE thyme honey available. Now don't tell me, thyme honey is poison to humans.

    http://www.amazon.com/Thymian-alpine.../dp/B004EXNKDI
    http://www.kretanatura.de/tyminan-honig/index.php

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    5,999

    Default Re: oil of wintergreen

    Ted is that pure oil on that cardboard? Wouldn't that be a heckuva lot of oil, plus pretty expensive?
    44 years, been commercial, outfits up to 4000 hives, now 120 hives and 200 nucs as a hobby, selling bees. T (mostly).

  6. #26
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Chardon, Ohio
    Posts
    88

    Default Re: oil of wintergreen

    Quote Originally Posted by Katharina View Post
    I was researching the wintergeen oil a little bit and it turned out that it is toxic to humans. 10mg, a very small amount, on the skin can kill you. You must wear protective gloves when handling this stuff.
    While I support safe handling of all chemicals, as all of them are toxic at high enough doses, Oil of Wintergreen really is not particularly toxic. It has an oral ld50 of nearly 900 mg/kg in rats and an estimated oral ldl of several hundred mg/kg in humans. This is a bit less toxic than aspirin or caffeine. So, it should be handled with about the same safety precautions used to handle aspirin or caffeine.

    Dick

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Mirabel, Québec, Canada
    Posts
    423

    Default Re: oil of wintergreen

    Quote Originally Posted by Axtmann View Post
    I use natural Thymol in strips as a mite treatment for many years. IMO it is the best and easiest way to treat against Varroa and tracheal mites. When I use Thymol (even during honey flow) I never ever had any problems with a taste in my honey.
    Even if this would be happen, I'm not worried about it. Check the internet, there are several areas in the world where they have thyme fields and PURE thyme honey available. Now don't tell me, thyme honey is poison to humans.

    http://www.amazon.com/Thymian-alpine.../dp/B004EXNKDI
    http://www.kretanatura.de/tyminan-honig/index.php
    From what I read, there is no thymol in thyme nectar. Or very, very, very little. I might be thinking of menthol, but I think it actually applies to both. The thymol, and menthol, are in the green parts, the leaves.
    Last edited by Dominic; 10-08-2013 at 05:51 PM.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Lebanon Pa
    Posts
    76

    Default Re: oil of wintergreen

    ted or anyone would you use wintergreen after treating with MAQS about a month ago and could u lay it across the frames like MAQS I treated all of my hives with the MAQS and 2 of them still have some mites present would wintergreen be a good choice to try?

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Glencoe, Okla USA
    Posts
    305

    Default Re: oil of wintergreen

    Skoal chewing tobacco has wintergreen in it, I do not know the amount but it has the wintergreen smell. I chewed Skoal for several years, possibly that is my problems!

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Walker, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    903

    Default Re: oil of wintergreen

    Since no discussion of wintergreen oil is complete without mention of WVU's research, here is a link for anyone not familiar with their results:

    http://www.wvu.edu/~agexten/varroa/varroa2.htm

    Note that they were looking for an emulsifier to use in their syrups. However this can be overcome simply by placing the oils in a cup of water and blending on high in a blender for 5 minutes. The oils emulsify and stay that way for months. The emulsified oils can then be added to the sugar syrup and given to the bees.


    HTH

    Rusty

    edited to add:
    It has an oral ld50 of nearly 900 mg/kg in rats and an estimated oral ldl of several hundred mg/kg in humans.
    FWIW All the warnings I've read for wintergreen are not about taking it by mouth. They are about getting it on the skin. What the difference is, I don't know. I just take precautions not to get it on my skin. Actually, I tend to use spearmint oil instead because of the warnings on wintergreen. Since I don't know about these things, I just figured it was the better way to go--less chancy.
    Last edited by Rusty Hills Farm; 10-08-2013 at 12:11 PM.
    Rusty Hills Farm -- home of AQHA A Rusty Zipper & Rusty's Bees ( LC and T)

  11. #31
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Chardon, Ohio
    Posts
    88

    Default Re: oil of wintergreen

    FWIW All the warnings I've read for wintergreen are not about taking it by mouth. They are about getting it on the skin. What the difference is, I don't know. I just take precautions not to get it on my skin. Actually, I tend to use spearmint oil instead because of the warnings on wintergreen. Since I don't know about these things, I just figured it was the better way to go--less chancy.[/QUOTE]


    Wintergreen oil is ortho-carbomethoxyphenol. Most phenols are toxic at the cellular level simply due to their corrosive properties if concentrations are high enough. A household example of a phenol containing product is lysol. I would expect reasonably concentrated wintergreen oil on the skin to produce a localized burn where the skin cells have been killed if not washed off promptly when irritation is felt. Spearmint oil is mainly a mix of two terpenes, carvone and D-limonene. Most terpenes are not corrosive at the cellular level. Many produce a pronounced cooling feeling when applied to skin. Common examples of such terpenes would be camphor or menthol. In terms of oral toxicity both wintergreen and spearmint oils are roughly equally toxic and less toxic than aspirin. The original poster claimed a toxicity for wintergreen oil that is more toxic than the chemical weapon sarin. That simply is not remotely true.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Walker, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    903

    Default Re: oil of wintergreen

    That's good to know. Thanks!

    Rusty
    Rusty Hills Farm -- home of AQHA A Rusty Zipper & Rusty's Bees ( LC and T)

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