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  1. #1

    Default Checking for emergence from grafted cells?

    Do you go back a few days after planting cells to check for emergence or do you make your first check when you are checking for eggs?

    Thanks
    Dan

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,593

    Default Re: Checking for emergence from grafted cells?

    It depends on how much time I have...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    Tucson, Arizona, USA
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    5,408

    Default Re: Checking for emergence from grafted cells?

    I check for emergence, and at the same time try to ensure that each mating nuc still has a supply of honey, pollen, brood, and empty comb.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Cookeville, TN, USA
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    4,141

    Default Re: Checking for emergence from grafted cells?

    What do you do when the cell was a dud? That is, if you don't have another cell at the time.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Munfordville, Ky. U.S.A.
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    1,245

    Default Re: Checking for emergence from grafted cells?

    Quote Originally Posted by David LaFerney View Post
    What do you do when the cell was a dud? That is, if you don't have another cell at the time.
    PUNT!! Sorry I couldn't help myself. I'm wondering if you mean after planting in a queenless hive or in a nuc. There seems to be more than one train of thought going on here. If you planted it in a queenless hive, I would hope that you had an extra queen in a nuc for just such an emergency. That is what I plan to do when I get around to grafting. Or if I ever get genetics that I want to graft from. Next spring I intend to set up some nucs just for the banking of queens. If I don't need them then I can expand my Apiary or sell or give them away.
    So much to learn, so little time!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    Tucson, Arizona, USA
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    5,408

    Default Re: Checking for emergence from grafted cells?

    I mark them with a single white thumbtack and try to make sure I give them a frame with eggs, as soon as possible, to help reduce laying worker problems. Right now, I am between queen cell batches and have several mating nucs with white thumb tacks (telling me they are awaiting a cultured queen cell). I am watching them most closely until my next batch of queen cells is ready to place. If they raise their own queen cells from the eggs I give them, I will remove them when I place the cultured cell, but usually only if I sure those cells are older than my cultured cell. I think they help the new cultured virgins have a purpose -- destroy rival queens.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camas, WA
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    1,960

    Default Re: Checking for emergence from grafted cells?

    I only make a couple of batches of queens a year, so I check for emergence and then merge any nucs with failed cells with nucs that have hatched queens. In queen castle type setups I just remove the slide. In 5 frame boxes I replace empty comb with bees from the failed nucs.

    I make up new mating nucs with the next batch of cells since it will be maybe three weeks until I do my next batch. If I was making a batch a week, I would just add a frame of open brood to a failed nuc and then cut out any queen cells when I put the next cell in.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Palm Bay, FL, USA
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    2,297

    Default Re: Checking for emergence from grafted cells?

    I just replace the non-emerged cells with new ones. Or, right in the yard, you can graft a couple of cell cups from a nearby strong hive and push the cups into a brood frame. Or give them a frame of open brood/eggs from another strong hive and then requeen when you have cells available if you want specific genetics. I really dislike doing the work to make splits and then having to combine them or letting them dwindle, so I take pains to get them queenright.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    Cookeville, TN, USA
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    Default Re: Checking for emergence from grafted cells?

    Quote Originally Posted by Joseph Clemens View Post
    ...give them a frame with eggs, as soon as possible, to help reduce laying worker problems... If they raise their own queen cells from the eggs I give them, I will remove them when I place the cultured cell, but usually only if I sure those cells are older than my cultured cell. I think they help the new cultured virgins have a purpose -- destroy rival queens.
    That's what I've started doing, except always removing the wild cell - if I see it. I had one that I'm pretty sure developed a laying worker (or a really late starting queen that I couldn't find) after being queenless for too long. I'm waiting about 20 days after planting cells to decide if I have a laying queen or not, but now I'm checking after a few days to make sure the cell opened normally. Learning one mistake at a time.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    Cookeville, TN, USA
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    Default Re: Checking for emergence from grafted cells?

    Quote Originally Posted by fish_stix View Post
    I really dislike doing the work to make splits and then having to combine them or letting them dwindle, so I take pains to get them queenright.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Checking for emergence from grafted cells?

    So checking queen emergence will not disturb the virgins acceptance? I've raised a few queens I'm just trying to fine tune my schedule and do it better not necessarily faster!

    Thanks
    Dan

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
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    5,408

    Default Re: Checking for emergence from grafted cells?

    When the virgin emerges in her own mating nuc, I've never seen them later reject her, unless she fails to mate and start laying. They might then, later try to supersede her.

    I have seen them reject virgins with some physical defects, especially malformed wings, where they wouldn't be able to fly. At my post-emergence check, I usually take care of any malformed virgins, as soon as I spot them.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

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