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  1. #1
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    Feb 2011
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    Franklin County, PA
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    510

    Default Is taking bee pollen beneficial to humans??

    Is taking pollen beneficial to humans??
    I've read of all of the nutriets in pollen and how it helps with allergies.
    I'm wondering if anyone out there has had success with it.
    Curious to hear the response on this,
    Wolf

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Alachua County, FL, USA
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    Default Re: Is taking bee pollen beneficial to humans??

    Pollen is not nutritious. It is sold to desensitize allergies. Honey has pollen in suspension, unless it is refined which also pulls out other beneficial ingredients that make honey not sugar syrup.
    americasbeekeeper.com
    beekeeper@americasbeekeeper.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Brown County, IN
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    2,034

    Default Re: Is taking bee pollen beneficial to humans??

    Our State Association has a booth every summer at the State Fair where we sell hive products. We always have people who buy pollen, saying how much it helps with their allergies. We make no claims to that effect, we just sell them more pollen and make a generic comment along the lines of "I'm glad you find it helpful."

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Stilwell, KS
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    1,918

    Default Re: Is taking bee pollen beneficial to humans??

    I think it is a highly dubious claim. But if people want to beleive it, I am not going to try and convince them otherwise.

  5. #5
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    Feb 2010
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    S Hadley, Massachusetts USA
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    712

    Default Re: Is taking bee pollen beneficial to humans??

    I have know idea but multiflora rose pollen tastes yummy on vanilla ice cream!
    Pearl City Apiary Michael and Loucil Bach

  6. #6
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    May 2008
    Location
    Concord, CA
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    4,194

    Default Re: Is taking bee pollen beneficial to humans??

    I've read the human body can't break down the shell that encases pollen.
    Pollen in honey or bee bread might be more readily absorbed into the body though.
    Dan

  7. #7
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    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,742

    Default Re: Is taking bee pollen beneficial to humans??

    >I've read the human body can't break down the shell that encases pollen.

    And neither can the bees... until it's fermented into bee bread.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Kirkland, WA, USA
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    Default Re: Is taking bee pollen beneficial to humans??

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    >I've read the human body can't break down the shell that encases pollen.

    And neither can the bees... until it's fermented into bee bread.
    Actually, if you break out the scope you will discover that the majority of a bee's feces are pollen exine. Very, very few things can truly break down exine. Bees use a different method generally - they use pseudogermination to get the pollen to open the exine. Pollen stored in cells actually has enzymes added which deter this. Humans are horribly bad at digesting pollen with sealed exines. Those with large pores we can in fact digest.

    See http://www.voiceofthehive.com/VotH/1...ollen_Case.htm, if you are interested. (Yes, I spent way too much time learning about this. )
    http://www.voiceofthehive.com - Tales of Beekeeping and Honeybees

  9. #9
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    Dec 2005
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    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Default Re: Is taking bee pollen beneficial to humans??

    I had heard about the digestion problem long ago, when in school in OH. But, what about the effect of the pollen grains in the human body? Do they cause the body to react to their presence, in the digestive system, which brings about benefits to the respritory system? Since that is where most of the Allergies related to pollen occur.

    It doesn't make much sense to me to think that a non-windborn pollen in the human digestive system would have any kind of beneficial effect on the respritory system where windborn pollens have their effect. But I am open to evidence to the contrary.
    Mark Berninghausen
    The answers are the end. The questions are the journey. Journey on.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Stillwater, Oklahoma
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    115

    Default Re: Is taking bee pollen beneficial to humans??

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    It doesn't make much sense to me to think that a non-windborn pollen in the human digestive system would have any kind of beneficial effect on the respritory system where windborn pollens have their effect. But I am open to evidence to the contrary.
    I felt the same way until I saw my bees working ragweed which is wind pollinated and causes lots of allergies.

  11. #11
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    Nov 2004
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    Kirkland, WA, USA
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    Default Re: Is taking bee pollen beneficial to humans??

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    I had heard about the digestion problem long ago, when in school in OH. But, what about the effect of the pollen grains in the human body? Do they cause the body to react to their presence, in the digestive system, which brings about benefits to the respritory system? Since that is where most of the Allergies related to pollen occur.

    It doesn't make much sense to me to think that a non-windborn pollen in the human digestive system would have any kind of beneficial effect on the respritory system where windborn pollens have their effect. But I am open to evidence to the contrary.
    Interesting question with an interesting answer. If the result is truly an allergic reaction, then it is the response of the immune system (which is everywhere in your body that you have blood flow) which causes it. Thus any method by which the immune system is exposed to the exines which provoke a response is a gradual does which over time would desensitize. Think of it like this - when my wife goes in to get desensitized to bee stings, the shot is in her arm. But she might get stung on the leg, or the hand. It will be equally effective because the goal is to affect the system's response, not a given location. (If I told her she'd have to get a shot everywhere she could get stung, she'd tell me where to go).

    Pollen exines have been studied as containers for delivery of medicine, as some are so small that they make it intact through the digestive system. By comparison some are mighty boulders which would in no way do so. I do not know if you can have an allergic response to those which do not make it into the blood stream, so I wouldn't even begin to guess (sorry).
    http://www.voiceofthehive.com - Tales of Beekeeping and Honeybees

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Manitowoc WI USA
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    353

    Default Re: Is taking bee pollen beneficial to humans??

    Quote Originally Posted by xC0000005 View Post

    See http://www.voiceofthehive.com/VotH/1...ollen_Case.htm, if you are interested. (Yes, I spent way too much time learning about this. )
    I really liked the Ford Pinto and chocolate covered almond analogies. Thanks.

    I have a brand new pollen trap for sale!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Washington Crossing, PA
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    57

    Default Re: Is taking bee pollen beneficial to humans??

    speaking of multiflora rose Michae B, do bees get nectar from the multiflora rose because the "throat" of the flower seems too deep for them to get any. also what kind of pollen traps do you guys like to use?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    Wash Co., Ohio
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    117

    Default Re: Is taking bee pollen beneficial to humans??

    If people are willing to pay me for it, it is beneficial to this human

  15. #15
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    Dec 2005
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    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Default Re: Is taking bee pollen beneficial to humans??

    Quote Originally Posted by xC0000005 View Post
    If the result is truly an allergic reaction, then it is the response of the immune system (which is everywhere in your body that you have blood flow) which causes it. Thus any method by which the immune system is exposed to the exines which provoke a response is a gradual does which over time would desensitize.

    I do not know if you can have an allergic response to those which do not make it into the blood stream, so I wouldn't even begin to guess (sorry).
    This is the whole "problem", isn't it? What pollen is taken orally has to travel through the digestive system and then has to be absorbed through the walls of the intestines, I believe, into the blood stream, where the reaction to the allergin occurs and then that reaction is expressed in the respritory system and circulatory system, by the swelling of the throat, cutting off the airway, and in blood pressure.

    Desensitsing takes many shots, over a long period of time, does it not? What I have observed, anecdotally, is relief that occurs in a mtter of weeks, by the ingestion of comb honey. Pretty low dosage of pollen, w/ pretty quick results. Seems to be. Seems like suspicious cause and effect.
    Mark Berninghausen
    The answers are the end. The questions are the journey. Journey on.



  16. #16
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    May 2008
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    Blythe,California,USA
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    279

    Default Re: Is taking bee pollen beneficial to humans??

    Quote Originally Posted by indypartridge View Post
    Our State Association has a booth every summer at the State Fair where we sell hive products. We always have people who buy pollen, saying how much it helps with their allergies. We make no claims to that effect, we just sell them more pollen and make a generic comment along the lines of "I'm glad you find it helpful."
    hah. exactly! I don't know how many people buy my honey for the claim that it helps with their allergies , and undoubted I'm sure it does. I'm a strong believer in belief , but I'm no doctor.

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