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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    24,494

    Default Re: Langstroth as a warre ? yes? no? Thoughts? Suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Cacklewack View Post
    possibly detrimental to the colony.
    Best,
    Matt
    Thanks Matt. Makes sense for your operation.

    Detrimental? How? What way?

    Do most of you draw comb, foundationless, in frames between already drawn comb? I wouldn't expect a box of frames, even w/ wires, to produce combs in the frames, necassarily. I'd expect alot of cross combing.
    Mark Berninghausen "Ships at a distance have every man's wish on board." Zora Neale Hurston

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,492

    Default Re: Langstroth as a warre ? yes? no? Thoughts? Suggestions

    >The 8 frame English hive from Brushy Mountain I like. The question is, or has anyone, used a Langstroth as a Warre..

    No but I've put just top bars in them and when they were full moved them to a ten frame box and when that was full moved them to a 22 frame box and when that was full moved them to 33 frame box...

    >if so, just stack brood on top and feed empty boxes in from the bottom? Quilt top still used?

    I didn't, but I see no reason why you can't if you can do it on a Warre. but I don't think Warre was intending to do any inspections.

    I run a lot of eight frame mediums with foundaitonless frames. That would be my preference.
    Last edited by Michael Bush; 06-08-2011 at 07:52 PM. Reason: sp
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Susquehanna county, PA
    Posts
    124

    Default Re: Langstroth as a warre ? yes? no? Thoughts? Suggestions

    http://www.ruche-warre.com/ is a french commercial warre producer.
    You can see in the pictures the type of 1/2 frame I was talking about. Where the frame comes down but is foundationless.
    (if you have a google toolbar it will translate the page for you).
    He states he harvests several tons of honey a year.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Huntersville, NC
    Posts
    28

    Default Re: Langstroth as a warre ? yes? no? Thoughts? Suggestions

    Mr. Bush.. thanks very much for your insight....

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Eugene, Or
    Posts
    97

    Default Re: Langstroth as a warre ? yes? no? Thoughts? Suggestions

    I just captured an unexpected swarm and went threw them into the only hive I could find. It is a modified Lang ten frame Deep. The two end frames on each side have been modified to allow the inside corners to be blocked off (They are a few inches shorter). So, inside of hive is a octogon while outside is square. It was a project of my bee Sensei's that he said worked fine. He built a shed style roof and quilt box for it as well. It is just a single now (bees have been in for only 2 days) but I am going to throw a unmodified super under it with, maybe, half frames like the french guy mentioned above and see what happens. I am also builidng a screened bottom as I have heard they work well in my area (northwest). Right now the bees are using a cork sized hole and dont seem to mind....

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Chesterfield, NH
    Posts
    465

    Default Re: Langstroth as a warre ? yes? no? Thoughts? Suggestions

    #9 http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...067#post670067
    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie B View Post
    Sorry, I should have explained my thoughts in more detail. Not on this site but on others there seems to be a big debate
    about using Warre hives vs. Langs. There are several makers of Warre hives in the bay area who advertise the benefits of Warre hives vs. the "Old way of beekeeping" using Langs.


    Charlie
    Warre hives and Langs are about the same age just my $0.02


    BEE HAPPY Jim 134

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Otero County, New Mexico, USA
    Posts
    1,318

    Default Re: Langstroth as a warre ? yes? no? Thoughts? Suggestions

    I have heard of a few people using stacked 5 frame Nucleus boxes as Warre hives. Supposedly the dimensions are similar. Just have to build a quilt top. They would be a lot lighter too.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    84

    Default Re: Langstroth as a warre ? yes? no? Thoughts? Suggestions

    I keep bees in Langstroths, Warres and Top Bars. It is true that some aspects of each are interchangeable. The main concept of each style of hive is “what is the keeper’s agenda with the bees?” Each system has advantages and disadvantages, again depending on the keeper’s objectives for the bees. Basically bees can do well in practically any style of hive. I keep bees in Langs because I want honey and other bee products. The Lang and its system of management, done properly, is designed to provide the maximum level of production by design. It can be done quite well while still focused on healthy bees.
    Emile Warre developed his hive to walk a fine line of allowing bees to bee as natural as possible and still allow access to the hive and product for the keeper. Colony sizes and production is smaller then Langs. An average colony size is about 25, 000 bees compared to upwards of 70,000 in a Lang. Don’t get me wrong here on this next part- “keeping bees isn’t easy, but it is easier in a Warre, by design”.
    The Top Bar, I believe, is for keepers that like to “fuss” with their bees. Nothing wrong with that, if that’s what the keeper wants bees for. For me it is fun, to a point. I am either lazy, or not a control freak. A bit too much “fussing” for me.
    I interchange some methods and concepts between the different hives. I am sold on condensation boxes, (quilts). I designed them to fit the Langs and Top Bars. The rotation of comb in the Warre and Top Bar hives is self explanatory. I remove 3 old empty frames in each Lang brood box every early spring and replace them with frames with a ½ inch started strip on them. So about every 3 years the wax is rotated out. There is no such thing as a right or wrong hive; it’s just what is right or wrong for the keeper. Ernie

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    24,494

    Default Re: Langstroth as a warre ? yes? no? Thoughts? Suggestions

    Quilt Top? I bet I could find an illustration and directions on MBs' site. Anybody want to tell me about it here tho?

    I run some 5 frame nucs tghru the summer, just in case I need them. And then there are always some left to overwinter.
    Mark Berninghausen "Ships at a distance have every man's wish on board." Zora Neale Hurston

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Susquehanna county, PA
    Posts
    124

    Default Re: Langstroth as a warre ? yes? no? Thoughts? Suggestions

    Quilt top on my warre is as follows. I put hardware cloth on the bottom of the box. then put burlap in, filled the burlap with wood shavings (i used the shavings/bedding that they sell at farm supply stores), then i sealed up the burlap and but another layer of hardware cloth. The hardware cloth is to keep the mice from getting into the shavings and the hive itself.
    Between the quilt box, and the hive box I have a piece of row cover fabric just to provide a buffer between the two(i didnt want the bees building on the quilt box).
    The quilt box helps with condensation, it acts like a chimney getting moisture out of the hive, especially important in the winter. If you have seen moldy comb its recommended to use a quilt top.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    24,494

    Default Re: Langstroth as a warre ? yes? no? Thoughts? Suggestions

    So, basically it is a box, aka deep super?, filled w/ insulating material that also gathers the moisture given off by the bees?
    Mark Berninghausen "Ships at a distance have every man's wish on board." Zora Neale Hurston

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Susquehanna county, PA
    Posts
    124

    Default Re: Langstroth as a warre ? yes? no? Thoughts? Suggestions

    I think, off the top of my head it may be about 5-6 inches tall. Yes on the moisture collecting. The way I wrapped my head around it was when we were planning our chicken coop, a coop too small, will collect with moisture causing frost bit to the chickens, but if you give them enough room they will be fine all winter long. Our chicks were fine even with a nasty winter this year. Has to be smilar with the bees.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Des Moines County, IA, USA
    Posts
    128

    Default Re: Langstroth as a warre ? yes? no? Thoughts? Suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Cacklewack View Post
    sqkcrk,

    The main ideas to me would be:

    1) No foundation
    2) Undersupering/Nadiring
    3) Quilt box
    4) Hands off

    Matt
    I think a main point #5 may be just as important, and that is having the boxes square so they can be turned the warm-way(frames cross-ways to the entrance) for winter and then turned in the spring to the cold-way(as we normally do the Langstrothe).

    Merging Warre and Langstrothe techniques may be the best management for todays challenges.

    Goodluck
    Push, Pull, or get Out of the Way

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    caledon ontario canada
    Posts
    20

    Default Re: Langstroth as a warre ? yes? no? Thoughts? Suggestions

    how would i make a quilt for tbh 17" wide 36" long with a gabled roof? i was thinking of lining roof with a rectangle of foam insulation-leaving 2-3 inches between foamboard and top bars.
    which would be more efficient in south ontario winter?
    thanks
    "when the student is ready,the teacher will appear"

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    84

    Default Re: Langstroth as a warre ? yes? no? Thoughts? Suggestions

    Kaydee,
    The way I built condensation boxes for my Top Bars is “follower board” wood frames with mosquito screen on both sides about 4 inches wide. I fill these condensation follower boards with wood shavings and place one at each end of the colony. It is a bit tricky to build these condensation follower boards tight enough to keep the bees from getting by. I just traced off a regular follower board that fit well. I place a sheet of 1 ½ inch insulation foam over the entire bar area in the winter and lay a flat roof over it. The insulation and thick wood shavings keep the colony warm, but allow a certain amount of moisture movement. The only draw back I am running up against is the open cavities at either end on the outside of the condensation follower boards will mold a bit. This winter I am trying a method a fellow Top Bar’er told me and put crumpled up newspaper in the open cavity area. The other thing I do is build my Top Bars out of rough cut 2 inch cedar for insulation.

    Ernie

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Battle Ground , Washington, USA
    Posts
    712

    Default Re: Langstroth as a warre ? yes? no? Thoughts? Suggestions

    Seems like any kind of foundation keeps the bees from festooning which is the fastest way for them to build comb. I've been using wax and plastic foundation for years and started cutting out my plastic frames to allow them to build what ever size comb they want. Making bees build on anything seems contrary to what they would do in the wild. when they enter a tree or a house they dont build cells right on the wooden tree or inner plywood, they always suspend the comb. Should be all switched over to small cell in a couple years.
    I'm not tense, Just terribly, terribly alert!

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Seattle, WA, USA
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: Langstroth as a warre ? yes? no? Thoughts? Suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by BGhoney View Post
    Seems like any kind of foundation keeps the bees from festooning which is the fastest way for them to build comb. I've been using wax and plastic foundation for years and started cutting out my plastic frames to allow them to build what ever size comb they want. Making bees build on anything seems contrary to what they would do in the wild.
    1"-tall thin solid or foundation wax strips installed in a topbar or demi- or full-frame may suffice. This can be and is being done with hTBHs, Warrés, and Langs. But Langs IMO have too many structural defects for Warré-style management: honey boxes too heavy when loaded; overlarge, drafty rectangular "wine crate" form factor (unlike cozier square, 30%-smaller boxes); heterogeneous box depths; engaged handles making it difficult to lift & subinsert new boxes.

    Contrary to Warré dogma, I believe frames are okay in Warrés, so long as frame-style, interventionist management do not follow. I may fire up the table saw and give 'em a shot this year for spring-service new boxes...

    /AT

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    227

    Default Re: Langstroth as a warre ? yes? no? Thoughts? Suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by kaydee View Post
    how would i make a quilt for tbh 17" wide 36" long with a gabled roof? i was thinking of lining roof with a rectangle of foam insulation-leaving 2-3 inches between foamboard and top bars.
    which would be more efficient in south ontario winter?
    thanks
    Without getting all technical (I'm a engineer geek) the foam insulation is closed-cell and you could end up with condensation dripping back down on your bees during the winter. If you want to use a modern material instead of the saw dust I'd recommend that you use unbatted fiberglass. Unbatted insulation may not be available in your area, but you can always tear the batting (brown paper) off of batted insulation.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Seattle, WA, USA
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: Langstroth as a warre ? yes? no? Thoughts? Suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Zonker View Post
    Without getting all technical (I'm a engineer geek) the foam insulation is closed-cell and you could end up with condensation dripping back down on your bees ... unbatted fiberglass.
    Simpler is better: I used to have a nightmare of condensation and mold problems until I settled on this solution:

    * Ventilated and screened quilt box (1" holes, mesh & fabric exterior to keep out bugs & mice)
    * Synthetic curtail-liner fabric silicone-glued to underside (also acts an anti-slip)
    * Filled with shaved-aspen pet bedding works very well.

    Fancy foams, fire-retardant fiberglass, cellulose home insulation are all unnecessary. The aspen fill insulates, suppresses chimney drafts, and lets excess water vapor vent outside, preventing drips on the underside of the roof.

    /AT

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Otero County, New Mexico, USA
    Posts
    1,318

    Default Re: Langstroth as a warre ? yes? no? Thoughts? Suggestions

    I use a simple 4-5 inch tall box with burlap on both sides and filled with red cedar chips. Serves a double duty as an interface between non-standard sized roofs and standard hive boxes too. Sits on my inner cover under the outer cover/roof.

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