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Thread: Used hive boxes

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Brockville Ontario, Cnada
    Posts
    7

    Question Used hive boxes

    There is a beekeeper not very far form me selling used beekeeping equipment, including boxes...

    Should I or shouldn't I.... I am worried about bringing diseases to my yard, as small as it is...

    I find it very difficult locating ANY type of equipment in my area (Brockville Ontario), without having to drive for hours to get it. Being a part time beekeeper, and working 8 to 5, to only option is having them shipped... $$$...

    I searched the other threads for this topic with no luck, but I am sure it as been discussed...

    Cheers all, and thank you

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    3,770

    Default Re: Used hive boxes

    I've done it a few times. I never reuse frames but if the boxes are in good shape, I refurbish them. Here's what I do:

    - Roughly scrape old comb, propolis, peeling paint, etc., from the boxes...inside and out.
    - Check for and note any knot holes, splits, loose joints, etc.
    - Scrub the boxes, inside and out with a mix of TSP, bleach and Simple Green. The Simple Green helps get rid of the grime, the bleach helps disinfect and the TSP preps the boxes for repainting.
    - Dry well and then scorch the insides well with a propane torch
    - Repair loose joints, fill knot holes (or man made holes used for ventilation) with body filler
    - Sand as needed
    - Prime and paint

    If the boxes were home made, check to make sure they are of a standard size. Every once in a while, they'll be an odd box and it can be difficult to work with. I've had a few of those and I made them into box covers for my pail feeders. I don't care much about any wax moth damage I come across but if there are old frame rests in the boxes, I pull those out to get all the junk cleaned out from underneath them.

    If I'm concerned at all, I junk the box or paint the inside as well to better seal anything in the wood.

    So far, no problems at all other than a lot of work! Most of the ones I got were in good to excellent shape and virtually free so the time was worth it.
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Arcade,NY
    Posts
    149

    Default Re: Used hive boxes

    Quote Originally Posted by tchekote View Post
    There is a beekeeper not very far form me selling used beekeeping equipment, including boxes...

    Should I or shouldn't I.... I am worried about bringing diseases to my yard, as small as it is...

    I find it very difficult locating ANY type of equipment in my area (Brockville Ontario), without having to drive for hours to get it. Being a part time beekeeper, and working 8 to 5, to only option is having them shipped... $$$...

    I searched the other threads for this topic with no luck, but I am sure it as been discussed...

    Cheers all, and thank you
    if you can buy them cheap, get them. wash the boxes out in bleach and buy new frames for your boxes.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Oregon City, Oregon
    Posts
    991

    Default Re: Used hive boxes

    bleach will not kill foul brood, you must scorch the insides as stated earlier, foul brood is the only nasty I would worry about though...
    Honeydew

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ballard County, KY
    Posts
    348

    Default Re: Used hive boxes

    Quote Originally Posted by Ravenseye View Post
    I've done it a few times.
    - Dry well and then scorch the insides well with a propane torch
    I stacked mine up like a regular hive configuration, got out my charcoal starter bucket I got at Wallyworld and started about 10 charcoal briquets in it. After the charcoal got going real well I sat the bucket in the middle of the bottom deep, stacked the boxes up and put some plywood over the top. Let it sit until the charcoal burns out. I measured the temp. with a bbq meat thermometer and it was about 600 F. This would have lasted over an hour with the temp gradually decreasing as the fuel was consumed. I believe this pretty well killed anything on the inside of those boxes. I know it took care of the old wax and propalis.

    Tim
    Last edited by timgoodin; 06-03-2011 at 04:01 AM. Reason: spelling and grammar

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