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Thread: What is it.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Mims Florida
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    131

    Question What is it.

    The swarm I removed from the tree I checked it today and while filling the empty spaces I found this. Little worms? I do not belive there bees thay look to small.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    A vet is someone at some time in there life signed a blank check to the people of America that included there life.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Tulsa OK. USA
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    846

    Default Re: What is it.

    Pics not working, More than likely they are wax moth or shb. Jim
    Stop and smell the flowers, 50,000 ladies can't be wrong
    Bsweetapiary@aol.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Clifford Township, PA
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    1,982

    Default Re: What is it.

    Wax worm larvae.

    Wayne

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Mims Florida
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    131

    Default Re: What is it.

    What do I use tyo get rid of them? Any organic or do I have to use something from Dadant?
    A vet is someone at some time in there life signed a blank check to the people of America that included there life.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Concrete, WA, USA
    Posts
    761

    Default Re: What is it.

    More Bees !!!! thats the only way to deal with them within the hive - if they are in the stored boxes then use Peramoth chyrstals -

    but a stong hive will deal with the moth and larva -
    Doing the Right things Right
    http://thevalleysbuzz.webs.com/

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Collinsville, VA
    Posts
    446

    Default Re: What is it.

    Concrete-bees is right that a strong hive will take care of these themselves. If you have a weak hive though, it takes time to build them up. In the meantime you can get the same effect by reducing the hive to only so many boxes as the bees can completely cover. That could even mean moving them to a nuc. You will need to do this quick because moth larvae can destroy a hive fast.

    If you take any boxes off you need to freeze them before putting them back on. Freezing for 24 hours will kill the larvae. See the link below for freezing directions (time and temp). You can put the supers back on a strong hive and they will clean up the damage pretty quickly though if they're in honey, I wouldn't eat it.

    I got a lot of information from this blog when I had the problem last year. The main thing is you have to act quick. Good luck.

    http://basicbeekeeping.blogspot.com/...ey-bother.html

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Collinsville, VA
    Posts
    446

    Default Re: What is it.

    Sorry. I posted the wrong link. Please see this link below:

    http://basicbeekeeping.blogspot.com/...art-2-wax.html

    It says: "Fortunately you can kill all the larvae and eggs by freezing your combs and reusing them. 20 degrees (f) for 5 hours will kill all stages of wax moths in comb." This does kill them but the info came to late for me to save my hive last year.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Springfield, MO. USA
    Posts
    284

    Default Re: What is it.

    I was in one of my hives today and saw a bee with one of those in her grasps. She was running all over frantically, I guess trying to decide what to do with it. It wasn't long before a few other bees around her surrounded her and seem to be cheering her on! Kind of intereseting to watch. The next time I'm in there I'll have to take a closer look. I was a little rushed today.

    Later, John

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Elkton, Giles, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    1,339

    Default Re: What is it.

    Advice on wax worms is of little value. Indications that reflect beetle larvae:
    ...Sharp ridges down the sides - seen in the blow-up.
    ...No webbing
    ...Larvae outside the comb surface, not being attacked by bees - they spread a repellent wherever they go (slime). Bees avoid that comb.

    You can salvage the bees by shaking them off onto new foundation, but that comb will not be used without cleanup. Sorry for the bad news.
    Walt

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Huntsville, Alabama
    Posts
    677

    Default Re: What is it.

    As I look closer at the pictures, I am really leaning towards small hive beetle larvae. It appears there is already a little sliming of the frame. Take that frame out PRONTO and freeze it overnight. I had to do this with a nuc last summer. There SHB larve in two frames. Froze one a night for 2 nights in a row. Got rid of them and saved the nuc.
    I'd almost bet the house they are shb larvae....

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,347

    Default Re: What is it.

    Those are definitely SHB larvae. Their appearance, the sliming, and absence of any webbing. Wax moth larvae always use lots of webbing, SHB use none.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

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