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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Surfside Beach, SC
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    249

    Question Foundation for Crush and Strain

    For those of you who do the crush and strain method of processing your honey, what foundation do you find to be the most suitable for this and why?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,318

    Default Re: Foundation for Crush and Strain

    Foundationless, when built fresh in the season harvested, especially if it was never used to raise brood, it is the more delicate comb, easier to crush - and if you are looking for pure and light colored beeswax, there ya' go.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Tulsa OK. USA
    Posts
    846

    Default Re: Foundation for Crush and Strain

    I use some plastic foundation and some wax, I prefer to scrape the plasic and give it back to them . It seems there is enough wax left on them that the bees draw them back out pretty fast. I only do this with a couple of frames early each year just for my use, the rest I extract except a few foundationless that I use for cut comb. Jim
    Stop and smell the flowers, 50,000 ladies can't be wrong
    Bsweetapiary@aol.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,786

    Default Re: Foundation for Crush and Strain

    Anything but wired wax and DuraGilt or DuraComb works well.

    Thin surplus 7/11 will keep the queen out of the supers.
    Foundationless is by far the cheapest.
    I haven't done it, but a lot of people do as Bsweet said and scrape it off the plastic embossed foundation.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Taylorsville, NC,USA
    Posts
    82

    Default Re: Foundation for Crush and Strain

    The best I think is foundationless. Pure white comb and easy to crush. Next would be plastic. All ya have to do is scrape the. Comb off and give the frames back to them to build up.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Surfside Beach, SC
    Posts
    249

    Default Foundation questions

    Will the bees produce as much wax and honey without foundation?

    Is wax foundation eatable and suitable for comb honey?

    Thanks!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    3,423

    Default Re: Foundation questions

    There is special, thin "surplus" foundation for comb honey, but foundationless can be done for that too.

    If you have drawn comb on foundation, my personal opinion is that you should borrow or rent somebody else's extractor. Drawn comb is a valuable asset. Bees can store more honey next year if they have foundation. Also, having drawn comb is probably the most important factor in preventing swarms.

    In my opinion, it's just plain crazy to tear it up with a crush and strain method.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,786

    Default Re: Foundation questions

    >Will the bees produce as much wax and honey without foundation?

    Yes. But not as much as with drawn comb. Mostly it's a matter of time. The flow is short and if there is no where to store the nectar then the bees spend the flow building the comb to put it in. If you have drawn comb you'll get a lot more honey. On the other hand, comparing foundation to foundationless, they build the foundationless faster, so they will have a place to store the nectar sooner and will make more honey than with foundation.

    >Is wax foundation eatable and suitable for comb honey?

    The thin surplus is in theory. In reality it's contaminated, but probably less than the "medium brood" foundation.

    >In my opinion, it's just plain crazy to tear it up with a crush and strain method.

    If you have an extractor, yes.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Surfside Beach, SC
    Posts
    249

    Default Re: Foundation questions

    Yes, if I had an extractor, I would never process my honey by the "crush and strain" method. But, so far, I have only (3) hives and so this has been a satisfactory way to get the job done.

    I did buy a nice honey bucket with strainer that has really helped to speed things up.

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