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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Winder, GA, USA
    Posts
    163

    Default Bee removal question...

    I will be doing my first bee removal on Friday.
    Question:
    When you are vacuuming bees off the comb, what happens if you vacuum up the queen? I imagine it will be hard to spot her and just curious if this is common.
    Any advice to a newbee on doing removals? Please let me know what to watch out for, what to do that has worked for you.
    Also, I will be making my first bee vac this week. Any help on that would be appreciated also.
    Thank you!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    ElDorado,Arkansas,USA
    Posts
    284

    Default Re: Bee removal question...

    Adjust the air flow so it will just suck the bees down.If it sucks too hard and fast it will kill your bees.Go slow with it and you should be find.It does take some time to do it right but you will get all the bees with out killing very many at all.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Bee removal question...

    Good point made about the bee-vac. You might also check out this link: http://www.youtube.com/user/johnplut...26/hrAHGLVs3po . Most times I have spent a great amount of time rubber banding comb into frames but John Pluta justs uses wood spacers between brood comb, standing the comb up in the catch box. I'm going to try this on my next cut-out.

    Good luck,

    Pete0
    Bena, VA

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Kaufman, Texas
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Bee removal question...

    I've pulled about 6 hives so far this year and the queen was sucked in each time. She is usually in the last bunch of bees you suck up. Each time she has survived just fine and laied eggs within days.

    Just go easy on the suction, just enough where they don't bunch uo in the hose and block up the hose.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Winder, GA, USA
    Posts
    163

    Default Re: Bee removal question...

    How do you recommend I handle the brood comb? Should I make a vac that has a hive body and super on top to put the brood comb like Bushkill Bee Vac or is there another way to do it that might be better? Should I put in in empty frames and use rubber bands to hold it?
    Thanks!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fairfield, Virginia
    Posts
    1,002

    Default Re: Bee removal question...

    You could also take some comb with eggs and rubber bad it into a frame for a hive so that if the queen does get killed or lost they will have eggs to raise a queen. Also a lot of times when you do a removal this time of year you will find queen cells, try to save them and use them if the queen is killed.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Kaufman, Texas
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Bee removal question...

    I use a shop vac that dumps into a wire cage. It looks homemade and I borrowed it of a buddy, don't know where it came from. Be sure not to over fill it and with the warmer temps keep well ventilated. While it's still in the vac, keep the vac going so as not to over heat the bees.
    I typically use two to three cages when pulling a colony. The queen will be fine and sometimes if you catch her early, you will know as the bees all migrate to the cage. Keep smoking them each time they start getting grumpy, but as you get into the hive a bit they'll tend to get less aggressive.
    I took a hive last night and filled 2 boxes with the comb.(20 frames)

    Be sure to install in the frame right side up and stack in the box with the brew in the middle.
    I used to use rubber bands and they work, but get difficult to use when covered with honey. Now I go ahead and run my wire on one side of the frame and leave it tied to one end on the other side and tie it off once the comb is put in. Then come back a week later and cut away the wires after the bees have secured it. It's alittle more prep but is quicker in the field.

    Be prepared (I know from experience) make sure you have power, a ladder, whatever tools you need to dismantle the structure, a free standing light and all your frames and boxes you'll be using, up to two boxes and frames, a folding table helps too and a 6" knife to cut the comb.

    Suck the bees off and as you pull the piece of comb for 1 frame and suck them off the back.

    It takes me about 2-3 hrs to completely remove a hive. Start around and hour before dark or sooner and try to finish an hour after dusk to catch most of the bees. It helps to go back the next day and catch the stragglers, they'll be easy as they all bunch up, if you happened to miss the queen, she'll be in there. And start at the bottom if you can.

    Good luck!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Appleton WI
    Posts
    59

    Default Re: Bee removal question...

    Check the Beesource build it yourself section
    I used those plans and it worked great

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