The situation that Mark described is a reality for many many operations... and it used to be no problem to operate that way for decades...

The trouble today is that through the losses of the majority of our nations lineages, diversity has become so limited to crossing strains and the gene pool has become diluted... this combined with the effects of producers grafting all of their queens from one mother (causing buyers to requeen entire yards with sisters), varroa and varroa treatments effecting drone populations in mating yards, and the continuous battle for earlier and earlier queens, our nation has seen a major decline in production averages and queen longevity.

That is where I hope to make a difference... by lowering the need for treatments, raising the production averages, and bringing back a diversity that is based upon lineages, not simply crosses... of course there will always be those that are stuck needing to do what Mark had to do, but by providing pockets of these genetics all across the nation, there will more for those walkaways to breed with, a rise is feral that can survive mites and diseases, and more producers to answer the demand for queens each season, giving us all a bit more time to focus on quality...