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Thread: Jester EZ Nuc

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camas, WA
    Posts
    1,939

    Default Jester EZ Nuc

    I know that they are pretty new, but has anyone over wintered bees in a Jester EZ Nuc? I have some and am pretty impressed, but I don't know about the amount of ventilation or other winter issues with them.

    I'm going to try this winter, but if anyone has suggestions on adding or covering ventilation holes, let me know.

    On another related topic, I can see why they didn't name them "Jester EZ Fold Nuc". I usually don't RTFM unless all else fails. Even with the written instructions, I had no idea how to create a nuc out of that sheet. Fortunately there is a video on line that makes sense. I guess I would rather fold than paint.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Phelps Co. Missouri USA
    Posts
    856

    Default Re: Jester EZ Nuc

    What is the insulation factor on plastic, is it comparable to 3/4 in wood ??

    I thought they were really designed to transport bees in, and/or temporary storage till they can be placed in a regular hive ??

    PCM

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camas, WA
    Posts
    1,939

    Default Re: Jester EZ Nuc

    That's all I've used them for at this point. The insulation, venting, etc. is what I don't know about during wintering. I don't know if they really need the insulation, but I could push them together (no venting on the sides anymore) and put a long piece of foam insulation across the top of a row of them.

    The plastic is corrugated so it looks like there would be some insulation factor, but moisture dripping could be a problem.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Phelps Co. Missouri USA
    Posts
    856

    Default Re: Jester EZ Nuc

    Plastic has little if any insulation factor. touch the plastic on your car during the hot sun { cooked bees } touch the plastic inside your refrigerator [ frozen bees ]

    Probably great for the purpose intended, light weight shipping of nucs, and short term storage till bees can be placed into hive box.

    With 1,110 post on the board I'm sure you have experience with hive insulation and positioning, for cold wet WA. weather

    PCM

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camas, WA
    Posts
    1,939

    Default Re: Jester EZ Nuc

    The reason that I started thinking about it was that I delivered two of the nuc boxes to a purchaser when the weather was about 60 degrees, maybe a little less. There were 5 frames of bees and I had shook a couple of extra frames of bees in. So there were a lot of bees.

    When I got there I carried the nucs to where he wanted to install them and they were cool to the touch. As soon as I opened them I was surprised how warm they were inside. All of the propolis was soft and sticky and the heat was definitely noticeable.

    I really don't know how much insulation a nuc of bees needs around here. Over the years I have drilled and screened vent holes in my nuc boxes at each end (two on each end of some). I have duct taped over some of the holes after I had second thoughts about the venting.

    Last winter most of my nucs outgrew their boxes by fall, so they went through winter as singles. The one that was still a nuc had no vent holes and made it although the lid was soaking wet most of the winter.

    The EZ Nuc has a lot of small holes all around the box. I'll probably just use my wooden nuc boxes for next winter, but I was just wondering of anyone had tried it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Palm Bay, FL, USA
    Posts
    2,297

    Default Re: Jester EZ Nuc

    Ask Kevin Jester. He posts here sometimes or you can PM him.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    1,858

    Default Re: Jester EZ Nuc

    I've purchased several nucs from Kevin to resell to local beekeepers for several years--can't say enough good things about Kevin. I sold to one lady who was a first-year beekeeper, a horrible procrastinator, and one who simply wouldn't take any advice I gave despite asking me directly for it.

    She has left her original nuc in the EZ nuc box now for two winters. The first year she took it home it swarmed (Hmmm, imagine that!) and the second year she thought she wanted to convert it to a TBH (Nope, can't imagine that). At any rate, with no supplemental feed, no mite treatment, no insulation, and no extra attention, it survives.

    Go figure!

    Grant
    Jackson, MO
    Beekeeping With Twenty-five Hives: https://www.createspace.com/4152725

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